Country Suppers: Simple, Hearty Fare for Family and Friends

Country Suppers: Simple, Hearty Fare for Family and Friends

by Ruth Cousineau, Warren Kimble, Pamela Hoenig
     
 

Illustrated by Warren Kimble

Supper is a time for breaking bread with family, friends, and strangers who become friends. In Vermont, this means a tradition of communal eating — church suppers, chicken barbecues, fish fries, turkey socials, potluck, and pie auctions. Country Suppers pulls together a neighborly collection of more than 125 recipes from supper

Overview

Illustrated by Warren Kimble

Supper is a time for breaking bread with family, friends, and strangers who become friends. In Vermont, this means a tradition of communal eating — church suppers, chicken barbecues, fish fries, turkey socials, potluck, and pie auctions. Country Suppers pulls together a neighborly collection of more than 125 recipes from supper sojourners, dishes that are easy to put together and delicious to partake of, like Butternut Squash and Apple Soup, Mustard Maple Glazed Lamb Chops, and Blueberry Cobbler. Ruth Cousineau's satisfying recipes are packed with country kitchen tips and wisdom and are accompanied by the captivating folk art of Warren Kimble, a world of oversized sheep and sleepy country towns.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
In this delightful ramble through the Vermont countryside, Cousineau, a chef and cooking teacher, visits a variety of potluck suppers and seasonal food festivals in order to show readers how to re-create communal country fare at home. The recipes include flavorful soups, stews, breads and desserts Cousineau sampled at small-town church socials, ham dinners and strawberry festivals. It's easy to see why Vermonters take pleasure in cooking such comforting dishes as Stewed Chicken with Herbed Dumplings, Yankee Pot Roast, Blueberry Coffeecake and Hot Chocolate Pudding. Cousineau sprinkles the appealing text with entertaining Country Tips and Tales (poems, quotations and cooking hints), and noted folk artist Kimble provides dozens of charming illustrations. The book is divided by courses and, because these recipes come from New England, apples and country cheese appear with delicious frequency (e.g., Caramel Apple Pie and Cheddar Muffins). There is an entire chapter devoted to Pumpkin and Maple Desserts. There are a few "quick" recipes, but saving time (and calories) is not the point here: creating tasty, old fashioned suppers is, and few will be disappointed with the results. (Nov.)
Library Journal
Living in Vermont, Cousineau and her husband often go out to potluck suppers, church suppers, or town meeting suppers. Here she includes her favorite supper dishes, many of them casseroles, stews, pot pies, and one-dish meals, as well as breads, vegetable sides, and pickles. Some recipes come from friends and neighbors, others are those Cousineau likes to cook when they have guests. There are also separate chapters on chocolate, pumpkin, maple, and fruit desserts. Cousineau writes well, and her book of homey, comforting recipes is recommended for most collections.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780688152239
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
11/05/1997
Edition description:
1 ED
Pages:
288
Product dimensions:
7.25(w) x 9.44(h) x 0.95(d)

Related Subjects

Read an Excerpt

Three-Root Mash

Makes 6 to 8 Servings

Carrots and parsnips are joined by the Swede, or rutabaga to make this flavorful side dish. Roasting rather than boiling makes this homespun trio triple sweet.

1 1/2 tablespoons pure olive oil
1 pound carrots, quartered
1 pound parsnips, peeled, cored, and quartered
1 pound rutabaga, peeled and cut into 1/2-inch cubes
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

Preheat the oven to 4000F. Oil a baking pan with 1/2 tablespoon of the oil and spread the vegetables on the pan. Cover the pan tightly with a sheet of aluminum foil and cook until the vegetables are tender when pierced with a fork, about 40 minutes. Mash together with a fork or potato masher, seasoning with salt, pepper, and the remaining tablespoon olive oil. The mixture should be roughly mashed, not pureed. Reheat the mixture briefly in a skillet, stirring, over medium-low heat.

Copyright ) 1997 by Ruth Cousineau

Meet the Author

Ruth Cousineau has been the executive chef at First Fidelity Bank in Newark, New Jersey, a pastry chef in New York City, and a restaurateur and cooking teacher in Vermont. She has been a contributing editor to Good Food magazine and her book, The Tomato Imperative, was a James Beard Award nominee. She currently resides in West Rutland, Vermont, where she is a freelance chef and food consultant.

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