The Court-Martial of Mother Jones

Overview

In March 1913, labor agitator Mary Harris "Mother" Jones and forty-seven other civilians were tried by a military court on charges of murder and conspiracy to murder -- charges stemming from violence that erupted during the long coal miners' strike in the Paint Creek and Cabin Creek areas of Kanawha County, West Virginia. Immediately after the trial, some of the convicted defendants received conditional pardons, but Mother Jones and eleven others remained in custody until early ...

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Overview

In March 1913, labor agitator Mary Harris "Mother" Jones and forty-seven other civilians were tried by a military court on charges of murder and conspiracy to murder -- charges stemming from violence that erupted during the long coal miners' strike in the Paint Creek and Cabin Creek areas of Kanawha County, West Virginia. Immediately after the trial, some of the convicted defendants received conditional pardons, but Mother Jones and eleven others remained in custody until early May.

This arrest and conviction came in the latter years of Mother Jones's long career as a labor agitator. Eighty-one and feisty as ever, she was able to focus national attention on the miners' cause and on the governor's tactics for handling the dispute. Over the course of seven months, more than two hundred civilians were tried by courts-martial. Only during the Civil War and Reconstruction had the courts been used so extensively against private citizens, and the trial raised a number of civil rights issues.

The national outcry over Mother Jones's imprisonment led the United States Senate to appoint a subcommittee to examine mining conditions in West Virginia -- the first Senate subcommittee ever appointed to investigate a labor controversy. Public sentiment eventually forced a release of the prisoners and brought about a settlement of the strike. In the face of this overwhelmingly adverse publicity, the governor suppressed publication of the trial transcript, and it was long thought to have been destroyed.

Edward M. Steel Jr., an authority on Mother Jones, uncovered the trial proceedings while searching for Jones's manuscripts amid private papers at the West Virginia and Regional Collection. This volume makes available for the first time the transcript of this landmark case in labor and legal history, including an introduction that provides background on the issues involved.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"This remarkable piece of historical editing holds meaning for scholars of journalism, history, ethics, law, labor, political science, business, and feminism. Widely thought lost or destroyed, the transcript of the military court martial is a compelling addition to the growing supply of historical sources that suggest West Virginia history is in dire need of an overhaul." -- Journal of Appalachian Studies

"Steel's introduction to the transcript is thoughtful, his editing work meticulous. He is to be commended for making this document available to a wide readership." -- Journal of Southern History

"This is far more than simply another book on this remarkable woman. It is a scholarly presentation of an event which demonstrated the raw power of state and industry working in collusion to control labor." -- West Virginia History

"Steel provides a long, thoughtful, and complete introduction to the actual trial itself and the dominant role of Mother Jones in the strikes.... The combination of primary court documents and an introductory essay is a rewarding marriage in this volume." -- Journal of American History

Booknews
Makes available for the first time the transcript of the March 1913 trial by a military court of famed labor agitator Mother Jones 1843?- 1930 and 47 other civilians on charges of murder and conspiracy to murder--charges stemming from violence that erupted during the long coal miners' strike in the Paint Creek and Cabin Creek areas of Kanawha County, West Virginia. The introduction by editor Steel history emeritus, West Virginia U. provides background on the issues involved. Paper edition unseen, $18.95. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR booknews.com
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780813108575
  • Publisher: University Press of Kentucky
  • Publication date: 9/8/2008
  • Pages: 336
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.76 (d)

Meet the Author

Edward M. Steel Jr., professor emeritus of history at West Virginia University, is the editor of The Correspondence of Mother Jones and The Speeches and Writings of Mother Jones.

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Table of Contents

Preface
Introduction
Arrest 3
Habeas Corpus 13
Court-Martial 25
Writ of Prohibition 31
The Court-Martial Resumed 39
Sentences and Settlement 55
Repercussions 61
Conclusions 74
Notes 85
Transcript of the Court-Martial 97
Index 307
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