Cow

Cow

4.0 1
by Malachy Doyle, Angelo Rinaldi
     
 

What is it like to be a dairy cow?

Chewing your cud from dawn to dusk. Your long tail swishing from side to side. Resting in the shade of a tree by the river. Being milked in the cool milking parlor. Sleeping under the stars.

What is it like to be a dairy cow? Let's find out....See more details below

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Overview

What is it like to be a dairy cow?

Chewing your cud from dawn to dusk. Your long tail swishing from side to side. Resting in the shade of a tree by the river. Being milked in the cool milking parlor. Sleeping under the stars.

What is it like to be a dairy cow? Let's find out....

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publishers Weekly
A day in the life of a dairy cow is the centerpiece of this handsome and leisurely paced picture book. From dawn breaking in the dew-moistened meadow to a walk back into the field at dusk, Doyle (The Bold Boy) describes the cow's routine eating, resting and dutifully submitting to a milking machine in lulling, second-person text: "Your hooves click on the floor of the yard, the gate opens, and you enter the stall"; "The day warms up, and your breath comes hot and heavy from your broad, wet nose." The author offers occasional glimpses of the farmer and his children ("The children come to swing from the tree. Out over the river") but remains intent on the cow's experience ("You wait by the gate... your milk-full udders aching"). As fine complement, Rinaldi's (Rainy Day) elegantly rendered, photo-realistic oil paintings convey subtle changes in sunlight and shadow; his cows seem so lifelike that readers can almost hear the flies buzzing around them. A departure from the whimsical, Old MacDonald/ Click Clack Moo-style farms typically found in children's stories, this bucolic offering has sure educational value, but it may be realistic to a fault the monotony of the cow's existence seems unlikely to invite repeat readings. Ages 5-9. (July) Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.
School Library Journal - School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 4-In a symbiotic relationship, illustrations and text gently wow the senses as readers follow a cow through her slow, quiet day. Early morning birds and the farmer's familiar whistle are heard while a sense of the animal's "breath-hot and heavy" from a "broad, wet nose" is clearly imparted. Later, near the end of the day, her "milk-full udders aching, "she waits by the gate. From endpaper to endpaper, the double-page illustrations complete the mood. Reminiscent of John Constable's work, the art has the feel of the English countryside but could also be scenes from Wisconsin or Iowa. The universality and timelessness reflected in the oil paintings is both nostalgic and contemporary. The lighting is exquisite. Warm glow at dawn, fading colors at dusk, and filtered light in the coppice capture the serenity and rhythm of the meadow matron's day. This oversized book will work well for sharing during storytimes, but the pastoral paintings also offer a private gallery for singular enjoyment. This is a book not to be missed.-Carolyn Janssen, Children's Learning Center of the Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County, OH Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
"It's hard work being a cow," writes Doyle (Baby See, Baby Do!, p. 103, etc.), tongue firmly in cheek. Oh yes, hard-struggling to a stand in the early morning, ambling into the barn morning and evening for a milking, wandering down to the stream for a drink, snoozing in the shade until the hot day fades into starry night. Doyle is plainly envious, as will be readers when they meander through these pages. Practically every hair on the velvety hides of Rinaldi's photorealistic cows is visible-even more perceptible, though, is a sense of ponderous dignity, a slow, peaceable, relaxed participation in the seemingly timeless rhythms of a summer's day. Readers will wonder whether it's the farmer or his cattle (or maybe both) "pressing forward to the cool parlor at last" to escape the late afternoon heat, but that verbal ambiguity aside, children will be beguiled by this set of bovine portraits and serene, expertly painted farmscapes. (Picture book. 5-7)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780689844621
Publisher:
Margaret K. McElderry Books
Publication date:
07/28/2002
Pages:
40
Product dimensions:
10.02(w) x 12.14(h) x 0.41(d)
Age Range:
5 - 8 Years

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