Coyote (Coyote Series #1)

Coyote (Coyote Series #1)

4.4 31
by Allen Steele
     
 

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Coyote marks a dramatic new turn in the career of Allen Steele, Hugo Award-winning author of Chronospace. Epic in scope, passionate in its conviction, and set against a backdrop of plausible events, it tells the brilliant story of Earth’s first interstellar colonists—and the mysterious planet that becomes their home…

Overview

Coyote marks a dramatic new turn in the career of Allen Steele, Hugo Award-winning author of Chronospace. Epic in scope, passionate in its conviction, and set against a backdrop of plausible events, it tells the brilliant story of Earth’s first interstellar colonists—and the mysterious planet that becomes their home…

Editorial Reviews

The Barnes & Noble Review
Allen Steele's Coyote is reminiscent of science fiction classics like Isaac Asimov's Foundation series and Arthur C. Clarke's The Songs of Distant Earth. After stealing a starship full of political refugees, Captain Robert E. Lee and his crew travel to a distant planetary system with a habitable moon (named Coyote) with the dream of starting a colony free from governmental and social oppression.

The trip lasts 226 years, but while everyone is in biostasis, one of the crew members is accidentally awakened. With his cell permanently deactivated by the ship's AI, communications officer Leslie Gillis is doomed to a solitary life (and death) aboard the starship. When the rest of the crew is eventually reawakened as the ship reaches its destination, what they find is extraordinary.

Once the small colony is established on Coyote, they realize just how different their new world is from Earth. Exploration begins, and although a few colonists are killed by predators, the colony survives and even begins to thrive…that is, until a strange comet appears in the sky.

Coyote is an epic in every sense of the word, with complex story lines and wonderfully realistic characters who possess real flaws and dreams and problems. Not surprisingly, parts of this novel were nominated for Hugo Awards: "The Days Between" for Best Novelette and "Stealing Alabama" for Best Novella. This is one of the best science fiction novels I've read in years. Paul Goat Allen

USA Today
Steele has a no-nonsense style and an attention to his characters that make his books appealing...
New York Times Book Review
...full of pleasant surprises.
Publishers Weekly
At first, this novel from Hugo winner Steele looks like a fairly conventional tale of high-tech intrigue-in this case, rebels against a right-wing American dictatorship plot to steal the prototype interstellar spaceship built to immortalize the government's ideology by planting a colony of fanatics on another star's planet. However, once the freedom seekers arrive on the new world, Coyote, things get a lot more interesting. Coyote is habitable but alien, full of flora and fauna that upset the colonists' easy preconceptions. The young people, in particular, have to find their identities in a dangerous but wonderful environment; their discovery of what they can do individually as well as what they owe to the group nicely illustrates the name the starship's captain, R.E. Lee, has given their settlement: Liberty. That Steele's novel has been stitched together out of a series of short stories has advantages and disadvantages. The jumping around can be repetitious, but it also lets readers see the same events from different angles. By the same token, the narrative doesn't stay with individual characters, especially adults, long enough for the reader to get to know them, but it does give a panorama of the developing community. By the end, when an especially big challenge appears, the colonists are ready to face it confidently. The discovery of a new world is one of SF's most potent themes, and Steele handles it well. (Nov. 5) Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.
From the Publisher
“Splendid.”—The Denver Post
 
“Full of pleasant surprises.”—The New York Times Book Review
 
“One of the best space-exploration novels in recent memory.”—Rocky Mountain News
 
“In the best Robert Heinlein tradition.”—St. Louis Post-Dispatch
 
“An homage to wonder, hope and determination…Steele has constructed this glorious tale of a new starflung Mayflower from the legacies of Heinlein, Twain, Hemingway and others—and he has founded it on the essence of America.”—Stephen Baxter

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781101208168
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
11/05/2002
Series:
Coyote , #1
Sold by:
Penguin Group
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
448
Sales rank:
152,873
File size:
811 KB
Age Range:
18 Years

Meet the Author

Allen Steele was a journalist who covered the space program. He later turned to fiction writing, and his first novel, Orbital Decay, published by Ace Books, was chosen as the best first novel of the year by Locus. Allen himself went on to be nominated for the John W. Campbell Award for Best New Writer. He began writing and selling to the science fiction magazines and is a three-time Hugo Award winner for his short fiction. In 2013, he received the Robert A. Heinlein Award for outstanding published works in science fiction.


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Coyote (Coyote Series #1) 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 33 reviews.
Billychic More than 1 year ago
Allen Steele's Coyote not only combines space exploration with the right amount of hard science, fact, and fiction; he develops rich characters that stay with you in your mind long after you've shut the book. The book combines politics on a small scale (the books characters flee from political tyranny and oppression to start a new world light years away; a space version of our very own forefathers who struck out on the Mayflower and hit Plymouth Rock) with the determination of people trying to survive. It isn't chock full of happy endings, nor is it tragic throughout...it is a slice of life. One thing that can be said about the politics they run away from (the kind that round people who disagree with the administration and put them in detainment camps); it was written during the time when our constitution was being dragged through the mud after 9/11; but the author shows you both sides of the coin; how tyranny can come from either end of the political spectrum...which you find later on in the book. There are so many sub-stories within stories...points of view switched, but without confusion. It is startling how amazing and entertaining this novel is. There is one character, early on after flight begins, that although tragic, is a testament to the writer's work itself. As a writer and one who works in acting, reading plays and developing characters (and publishing, as a day job), I found it to be seamless in its imagery and dedication to simplicity while telling a wonderful tale. I wrote the author from his email at his website (just google him, it will come up; dunno if I put a website if they will delete this review) to let him know that his book was amazing (even if he'd written it 7 or 8 years ago) and within a day he wrote me back; a kind man who was happy to have a fan's appreciation. Please read this book no matter what your preferred genre...it's worth it.
Degas More than 1 year ago
It's always good to see new authors who can still achieve success in the SF genre. We see entirely too much fantasy masquerading as science fiction. A series like Steele's Coyote novels gives me hope that SF still lives. Having said all that, I hesitate to offer criticism. However, potential readers deserve honest reviews. My first criticisms are concerning the lack of research in 3 critical areas: Military, Science, and Planetary Ecology. While Mr. Steele makes some efforts in these areas, they fall short. Scientific story lines are abbreviated and just plain wrong, in some instances. In addition, the military scenarios are not well thought out or developed. The same may be said for the scenarios based on the moon Coyote's ecology. Mr. Steele could benefit from collaboration with experts in those fields. I was glad to see that his bibliography of sources has expanded with each novel published. It's definitely a step in the right direction. Those of you reading this will probably call these criticisms "nit-picking"...and to a certain extent, you would be correct. However, those types of details are what really make a book more entertaining and aid readers in that Holy Grail of authors: the suspension of disbelief. My only other comment is regarding the author's political views. I would not mention this had he not purposely injected them into the story line. Mr. Steele has rather aggressively incorporated into this series a political theme of secular liberal progressivism. There is no mention of religion travelling to the stars with his colonists. Marriages are performed by Justices of the Peace. Spouses are never referred to as "husbands" or "wives", but rather as "mates". Additionally, gay marriage is inserted into the storyline, beginning in "Coyote Frontiers". So-called "Green" philosophies are also incorporated in this series. Global Warming on Earth is in the process of rendering the colonists' homeworld inhabitable. All of these political views would be of no moment, were it not that Mr. Steele has made them a central part of his fiction. To his credit, he has fictionalized both radical conservatism and radical socialism as equally flawed when taken to their extremes. As a confirmed agnostic and a political independent, I make no judgement on his political viewpoint. However, the fact that he felt the need to inject them detracts from the storyline, and is worthy of mention to prospective buyers/readers. I have only read the first 3 books of the Coyote series. However, I would still recommend them to science fiction fans. Even though the series seems to be trending into more fantastical areas (advanced technology acquired through a miraculous "chance" encounter with alien species, as one example), these 3 novels represent real value to SF readers.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I realize this book and its companions have been out for quite some time now and I am just beginning to appreciate Allen Steele. The first book , Coyote, is fantastic. The writing is good, the imagination is better and the storyline is the best. I have both of the companions coming and can't wait to read them both.
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