Cracking Da Vinci's Code

Overview

The controversy grows with every sale of the bestselling novel. Throughout the contemporary fictional storyline of The Da Vinci Code, author Dan Brown skillfully weaves “historical” assertions intended to shake the very foundations of Christianity:
• Was Jesus merely human and not divine?
• Did Jesus and Mary Magdalene marry and have children?
• Is there a Holy Grail? If so, ...

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Overview

The controversy grows with every sale of the bestselling novel. Throughout the contemporary fictional storyline of The Da Vinci Code, author Dan Brown skillfully weaves “historical” assertions intended to shake the very foundations of Christianity:
• Was Jesus merely human and not divine?
• Did Jesus and Mary Magdalene marry and have children?
• Is there a Holy Grail? If so, what is it and where can it be found?

CRACKING DA VINCI’S CODE is the long-awaited answer to these and other questions. Authors James L. Garlow and Peter Jones present compelling evidence that Brown’s assertions are not only historically inaccurate, but may also contain a hidden agenda.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780641703737
  • Publisher: Brilliance Audio
  • Publication date: 4/15/2004
  • Format: Cassette
  • Edition description: Unabridged, 4 cassettes, 6 hours
  • Product dimensions: 4.38 (w) x 7.00 (h) x 1.44 (d)

Meet the Author

Dr. James Garlow is the pastor of Skyline Wesleyan Church, a congregation with an average attendance of 3500 in San Diego, California. Among his degrees are a MDiv from Asbury Seminary, a Master's in Theology from Princeton Seminary, and a Ph.D. from Drew University. He is the author of How God Saved Civilization, A Christian's Response to Islam, and many other works.

Dr. Peter Jones holds a MDiv from Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary, a ThM from Harvard Divinity School, and a Ph.D. from Princeton Theological Seminary. He is a professor of New Testament at Westminster Seminary in Escondido, California, and is the author of numerous books, including The Gnostic Empire Strikes Back.

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Sort by: Showing all of 17 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 20, 2006

    Can't see the forest for the trees

    These authors are so part of the male dominated--male as privledged--male as having rights --male as owning women environment, they can't even make statements that don't assume we all believe as they do as they have been taught to. I (a woman) have debated Catholic clergy about why they don't tell 'the masses' i.e. us all they know and study in seminary. We need to be kept ignorant because we can't handle it. That is what I was told by the head of the seminary at the Catholic University of America. I asked why the Christian wedding ceremony says 'man and wife' ie man and his property wife vs husband and wife ie. equal partners. His answer was that women belong to the men they marry. I asked the same question of another priest who refused to say 'I now pronounce you husband and wife' and would only say 'I now pronounce you man and wife'. The woman I was with found a different priest. You guys are stating things you say Dan Brown implies and he doesn't. You all are just running scared that your view of the world might open up a bit. I feel so very sorry for you. I will pray for you.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 10, 2006

    Wake up

    Before buying this book you should realize what it is and who it is written by. It seems illogical to buy the book and expect something other than what it is. James Garlow is a pastor and therefore you can expect it to have a conservative christian bias. You may not be able to read an about the author, but based on what other people bought who also bought this book make the connection that this is a book based on christian values and beliefs.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 11, 2006

    Cracking or Mashing the Code?

    when i picked up this book as a reference for my freshman term elective class, i hoped i was picking up the most un-biased book i could find. i was sorely nistaken. Cracking Da Vinci's Code was filled with the rantings of stubborn, close minded christian who could not seem to realize that The Da Vinci Code is a work of FICTION. i repeat, FICTION! sure it has some conspiracy in it, but whats a book without entertainment? these two cry babies need to shut their mouths, and open their eyes to the world, which just happens to be a lot less christian than it used to be.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 18, 2005

    The Illogical Force

    A little imperfect, this book really helps those who are humble enough to say yes in responding the question 'God, are you still here?' This book will help those in need of God's silent presence. This book will help readers in many parts of the world where the Highest Illogical Force still rules. In fact, those who need this book (for whom this book is written) are billions more than those who claim they don't need it. Readers who choose not to smartly consider the positive role of the Highest Illogical Force always have other books to read. This book is not written for them. The decision to read this book and to write their review here itself is their own mistake, not the authors'.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 23, 2005

    Da Vinci Bashing

    Recently reading Dan Brown's 'The Da Vinci Code' I was very interested in looking into what truly were the 'facts' about the Holy Grail, Jesus, etc etc. Luckily I found this book, and I thought it would give me some insight about what Brown presented in his book. Instead, all I received was a Christian, finger-pointing pamphlet about all the wrong things Brown did. Granted, not everything in the book (even that which was based on fact) was 100% accurate, but it was distorted primarily to emphasize where the book was going. It was also used to keep the reader guessing and on the edge of his or her seat. Remember it is a work of FICTION, even if it is surrounded by facts. Also realize that this book is interlaced with fact, and wrapped by fiction. Fiction mixed with fact mixed with fiction. My point: this is meant for entertainment. The worst was when Garlow and Jones are trying to convince you that Brown has written this book in order to brainwash the masses. This book is an insult to people reading who are trying to gain more insight and knowledge about this historical set of events, and also to theologians who didn't have a say in what these two other guys were able to get published. By providing more questions than answers, Garlow and Jones failed miserably in producing facts and a plausable argument. This is a weakly supported, finger-pointing, cry-babying escapade by two Christians who feel that their way is the only righteous way, and everything else is just wrong. Tis true, 'blinding ignorance does mislead us....'

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 12, 2005

    Very Disappointing

    I rarely regret buying a book online but wouldn't have carried this one out of a bookstore. Had I known it was simply a fundamentalist apology intertwined with a sophmoric fable, I would have passed. I actually did make it halfway through, though, before remembering it's really okay not to finish a book you're not enjoying.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 28, 2004

    Obviously underappreciated or misunderstood.

    Any who doubts this book's intention, thinks they will be 'bored' by it, seems to think 'The Di Vinci Code' is based on fact, or desires to know the truth behind the ill-fated 'facts' Dan Brown's book was based on should definitely buy this 'must have'. 'The Di Vinci Code' is a complete work of fiction based on adventure, conspiracy, and misconceptions. To think it otherwise is in error and regardless of personal beliefs one may hold 'Cracking the Di Vinci Code' is the prime source of truth in regards to this issue. Offhand, it should be noted the statement of, 'we won't even go into if Jesus and Mary were married,' is not the status-quo of the book and was said as the notion is ridiculous to begin with.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 3, 2004

    A desperate attempt to crush the genius of Dan's novel

    This book was a horrible read. I can not imagine a worse way to try and 'crack' the illuminating historical ideas written in this book. The fact of The Da Vinci Code's obvious popularity and insight has made christians desperatly try and blow off everything written. Dan was not the first to give this idea and he has a far better understanding and support then the bible ever had. I despise this book. It's not worth your time.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 17, 2004

    Want answers? Definitely worth reading!!!

    While not a perfect book, it remains engaging and informative. It may seem lightweight to hard core researchers, but for the average student, this provides an excellent platform for judging many of the ideas in the Da Vinci Code. There are plenty of end notes and research references to continue your study in-depth, without becoming cumbersome. I thoroughly enjoyed the fictional account woven through the commentary for two reasons. First, it nicely paralled Brown's story of a young woman's journey. Second, it accurately reflects an average modern person's development of attitudes, beliefs and ideas when exposed to speculative fiction like Brown's Da Vinci Code. And while the Da Vinci Code is written as 'fiction', many people are responding as though it is based on fact, rather than fictional alternative history. Readers know better when they read a book with the premise of 'what if JFK had lived' or 'what if Hitler had won', yet this book has had a huge impact on people's perceptions of history and religion. Although written from a Christian perspective, Christian and Non-Christian alike will benefit from this book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 28, 2004

    Don't bother with this book!

    The authors do nothing to enlighten readers to the theories Brown presents. With extremey lame writing and a pathetic fictional character, Carrie, the authors use such words as 'we won't even go into if Jesus and Mary were married'....so much for decoding! Please don't waste your money, youi can have my copy!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 28, 2004

    Horrible , not worth reading

    This book is absolutely dreadful. After reading the Da Vinci Code I was hoping to research more and find the actual truth behind Brown's Book. I thought The Da Vinci Code was amazing! Which is completely opposite from Garlow and Jone's Book. Instead of producing real fact, Cracking Da Vinci's Code just carried on how Brown was wrong in his statements, completely degrading and devaluing anything Brown said. I just wanted to throw it out. What a real disappointment.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 20, 2004

    Cracking The Da Vinci Code by Garlow and Jones there own story.

    No point in my eyes in writing this book on Dan Browns novel.His point and not much to it except to discredit most of Browns book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 1, 2004

    Very bad rebuttal!!

    This book offers no new insight of what the Da Vinci code is about. The authors ommit many question because they are 'too complicated to explain in these pages'. It also keeps refering to the bible as the main source of their research.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 26, 2004

    Written as a rebuttal of Dan Brown's book, Da Vinci Code

    I had expected better from two well-credentialed authors, but this did not meet my expectations. This book feels written to win back Christians disillisioned by Dan Brown's book, The Da Vinci Code. Like many readers of Brown's book, I was curious about where the historical elements end and the fiction begins. This book didn't offer much insight.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 6, 2004

    Great Read, It finally makes sense

    A must read for anyone who has read Dan Brown's The Da Vinci Code.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 29, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 6, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

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