Cracking the Da Vinci Code: The Unauthorized Guide to the Facts Behind Dan Brown's Bestselling Novel
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Cracking the Da Vinci Code: The Unauthorized Guide to the Facts Behind Dan Brown's Bestselling Novel

3.4 14
by Simon Cox
     
 
Dan Brown's best-selling novel, The Da Vinci Code, has become a global phenomenon, and introduced millions of readers to a mysterious world where Leonardo Da Vinci encoded hidden meanings into his paintings; strange symbols are engraved in a remote British chapel; and the Catholic church and an ancient secret society are locked into a centuries-old battle to

Overview

Dan Brown's best-selling novel, The Da Vinci Code, has become a global phenomenon, and introduced millions of readers to a mysterious world where Leonardo Da Vinci encoded hidden meanings into his paintings; strange symbols are engraved in a remote British chapel; and the Catholic church and an ancient secret society are locked into a centuries-old battle to gain control of the ultimate prize; the Holy Grail.

But how much of the novel is actually true and what is fictional distortion? Cracking the Da Vinci Code: An A to Z Guide to the Facts Behind the Fiction is the first book to cut through the confusion and disclose the amazing facts that underpin the plot. In a simple A-Z format it reveals the historical basis of the secrets contained in the book, including background information on all the key figures, reproductions of the symbols encoded in the paintings, and insider knowledge such as the riddles hidden in the characters' names.

Cracking the Da Vinci Code: An A to Z Guide to the Facts Behind the Fiction is an invaluable resource for the many enthusiasts of the novel and all those who want to learn more about the remarkable truth behind the legend of the Holy Grail. Everything you need to know about the facts behind the fiction, including entries on:

  • Church of Saint-Sulpice
  • Cryptology
  • Fibonnaci Sequence
  • Goddess Worshipping
  • Golden Ratio
  • The Holy Grail
  • Knights Templar
  • Leonardo da Vinci
  • The Louvre
  • Mary Magdalene
  • The Mona Lisa
  • Opus Dei
  • Pagan Symbols
  • Pentagrams
  • Pope Clement V
  • The Priory of Sion
  • The Rose Line
  • Rosslyn Chapel
  • Sacred Geometry
  • Solomon's Temple
  • Vitruvian Man

Simon Cox is the editor-in-chief of Phenomena, the magazine devoted to challenging dogmas, orthodoxies and half-truths. He has also worked as a researcher for some of the leading names in the alternative history field, including Robert Bauval, David Rohl and Graham Hancock. Simon is currently making a documentary based on the facts behind The Da Vinci Code for a major US production company.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780760759318
Publisher:
Sterling Publishing
Publication date:
05/14/2004
Pages:
160
Product dimensions:
6.20(w) x 8.44(h) x 0.78(d)

Meet the Author

Simon Cox was the founding editor-in-chief of Phenomena magazine, a U.S. based newstand publication launched in 2003. Having studied Egyptology at University College London, he went on to work as a research assistant for some of the biggest names in the alternative history game, including Graham Hancock, Robert Bauval, and David Rohl. He lives in England.

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Cracking the Da Vinci Code 3.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 14 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Cox sets out to give us 'the facts' behind Don Brown's Da Vinci Code. However, his gullibility and historical inaccuracies frequently get the better of him. Typical is the assertion that 'Solomon' derives from 'Sol' (Sun) and 'Amun' (Egyptian Sun god), thus casting doubt on the real existence of the man at all, making him only 'a symbolic reference and wordplay.' (p. 147). 'Sol' is Latin, while 'Amun' is Egyptian. Yet the name Solomon appears in Hebrew texts long before the Hebrews first had contact with the Romans, after the Maccabean Revolt (ca. 150BC). Furthermore, in Hebrew, the final -N is not even present; it was added to meet Greek language requirements (ca. 270BC). In Hebrew, he is King Sh'lomo. So it would be hard to find a more specious derivation than that offered by Cox, or by the 'many modern commentators' to whom he refers. The book is riddled with inaccuracies about Gnosticism, as well as historically false statements about the First Council of Nicaea (325). The books of the New Testament were NOT chosen by the Council. A general consensus had developed since early in the Second Century; but it was not until well after I Nicaea that we have 'finalized' lists. The motivation for finalizing them is far different than Brown or Cox allege. But the Four Gospels in particular were 'settled' before 110AD. There was no further dispute about them, except for Marcion, who tried to rewrite Luke for his own purposes. He did not succeed. Cox does not check his facts carefully enough to claim that he gives us a factual Guide to Brown's fiction. Cox's treatment of Pierre Plantard is hardly sufficient disclosure of the man's chicanery. Plantard is critical to Brown's phoney 'case.'
Guest More than 1 year ago
A thrilling ride from beginning to end. As long as you are mature enough to understand that it is, in fact, a work of fiction and not based on much factual historical accuracy, you too will love this novel. The characters are compelling and interesting with enough development to make you care about them yet not overplaying them. This book is well suited to anyone who just likes a rocking good yarn!!
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The Da Vinci Code is just a work of fiction. While the question of whether or not this or that is true remains, how about everyone stop being so critical. It is not being passed as a textbook for future history classes. It's just a wonderful read that simply is meant to stimulate the mind. I don't see anyone throwing such a big fit over Angels & Demons companion books. This story is pretty much the same in both. Grow up.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This 'book' (glossary) seems to be built on faith more than fact. The problem most harsh critics have with The Da Vinci Code is that it contradicts their beliefs. Worse, with the facts it used, it makes them question their beliefs. Which frightens them. Those with blind faith who read The Da Vinci Code look to Cracking the Da Vinci Code for comfort, telling themselves that it will all be all right, they're not wrong, they were always right. I think fact speaks volumes while faith has trouble scrounging up a paragraph. This 'book' proves it.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This companion book to The DaVinci Code was mediocre. It was easy to follow, but gave no one's commentary or opinion on any of the issues surrounding The DaVinci Code. This is a GLOSSARY at best!!!
Guest More than 1 year ago
Plump full of details, well organized and clearly articulated. Surprising how much Brown glossed over or just plain got wrong! Of all of these companion books I've picked up this is by far the best.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Not a bad book, but I felt Steve Kellmeyer's 'Fact and Fiction in the Da Vinci Code' was better.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This little book is a great companion to Da Vinci Code. Simple to read and straight to the point, it leaves the pontificating to others, instead giving us straight facts relating to the novel and the story behind it. Some fascinating stuff in here. Glad I picked it up.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Dan Brown's 'Da Vinci' code is an undocumented, fantasy excursion into the world of hate-fiction. It is passed off as a quasi-historical work; but, in reality it is a thinly veiled diatribe, as are Mr. Brown's other works, against Christianity. Had Brown's target been any religion, other than Christianity, he would be labled a 'Hate Monger' that appeals to the historically challenged and religiously bigoted. It is a must read for those who enjoy literature which combines a light dose of suspense with a deep antipathy towards Christiantiy and history.