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Craft and Social Inquiry
     

Craft and Social Inquiry

by Costin, Rita P. Wright, Elizabeth M. Brumfiel (Contribution by)
 

Crafting and craft objects intersect with all cultural domains: economic, social, political, and rituall. Craft goods are social objects that assume an importance beyond household maintenance and reproduction. They signify and legitimize group membership and social roles, and become reserves of wealth, storing intrinsically valuable materials and the labor

Overview

Crafting and craft objects intersect with all cultural domains: economic, social, political, and rituall. Craft goods are social objects that assume an importance beyond household maintenance and reproduction. They signify and legitimize group membership and social roles, and become reserves of wealth, storing intrinsically valuable materials and the labor invested in their manufacture. Specialized craft producers are actors involved in the creation and maintenance of social networks, wealth, and social legitimacy. Artisans and consumers must accept, create or negotiate the social legitimacy of production and the conditions of production and distribution, usually defined in terms of social identity. The nature of that process defines the organization of production and the social relations of production systems and explanations for their form and dynamic are destined to be unidimensional and unidirectional, lacking in key elements of social process and social behavior. This volume addresses the questions of artisan identify, social identify, and what these inquiries contribute to understandings about social organization and economic organization.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780913167908
Publisher:
Wiley
Publication date:
04/17/2012
Series:
APAZ - Archaeological Papers of the American Anthropological Association Series , #1
Pages:
189
Product dimensions:
8.30(w) x 10.80(h) x 0.40(d)

Meet the Author

Cathy Lynne Costin is Professor of Anthropology at California State University, Northridge. Her research areas are Craft production and specialization, divisions of labor, gender, political economy and social inequality, evolution of complex society, exchange Andean, South America, ceramics, textiles, and protection of cultural property.

Rita P. Wright is Professor of Anthropology at New York University. She studies urbanism; state formation; gender relations; the ancient Near East; and South Asia.

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