Craftsman Houses: The 1913 Catalog [NOOK Book]

Overview


Gustav Stickley pioneered a form of architecture based on beauty, simplicity, utility, and organic harmony. This inexpensive reprint of a very rare catalog testifies to the enduring charm of his designs. It comprises numerous architectural drawings and photographs of Mission-style homes, including floor plans and descriptive text.
"Planned for comfort, convenience, and economy," each of these homes features a simple arrangement of rooms and sturdy structural features. Combining...
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Craftsman Houses: The 1913 Catalog

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Overview


Gustav Stickley pioneered a form of architecture based on beauty, simplicity, utility, and organic harmony. This inexpensive reprint of a very rare catalog testifies to the enduring charm of his designs. It comprises numerous architectural drawings and photographs of Mission-style homes, including floor plans and descriptive text.
"Planned for comfort, convenience, and economy," each of these homes features a simple arrangement of rooms and sturdy structural features. Combining good taste with practicality, they offer openness for common household life, as well as sufficient seclusion for privacy. Models range from a two-family house of cement or stucco to a nine-room cottage of brick and shingles and a seven-room country bungalow. Restorers of old houses, preservationists, and students of American architectural history will prize this well-illustrated treasury of authentic plans and details.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780486140179
  • Publisher: Dover Publications
  • Publication date: 2/16/2012
  • Series: Dover Architecture
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 144
  • Sales rank: 950,771
  • File size: 12 MB
  • Note: This product may take a few minutes to download.

Meet the Author


Furniture maker and architect Gustav Stickley (1858-1942) was a leading spokesman for the American Craftsman movement, a design trend descended directly from the British Arts and Crafts movement.
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Read an Excerpt

CRAFTSMAN HOUSE

THE 1913 CATALOG


By Gustav Stickley

Dover Publications, Inc.

Copyright © 2009 Dover Publications, Inc.
All rights reserved.
ISBN: 978-0-486-14017-9



CHAPTER 1

AN OUTSIDE POINT OF VIEW UPON THE CRAFTSMAN MOVEMENT


"A CENTURY or even a half century ago the living room was the joy of the log home or the more pretentious mansion. A big fireplace was the center of attraction and here all the household spent the long evenings in democratic fashion. The big kitchen was the dining room also, and here the old-fashioned range furnished both heat and gustatory splendor for the big family.

"Then the heating stove came and the living room was cut into smaller rooms and floors had to be carpeted and furniture plush-upholstered and windows hung with heavy lambrequins and God's sunlight and pure air very much kept out of the house.

"Then came this man—Gustav Stickley—who longed for the freedom and roominess of other days, who saw that the fuel question and the servant question and the question of health must all be reckoned with in the architecture of the modern home; and so he began to plan homes suited to the lives of the people, as reasonable as could be made for the rearing of families who did not want to live beyond their income.

"He saw that many of the problems of life in the home were the result of thoughtless and inartistic architecture, and that if convenience were linked with beauty, economy with good taste, the home life could be made not only a joy and luxury, but a positive influence in molding public opinion and law.

"Hence we have the outdoor sleeping porch that started the crusade against the white plague; we have the big screened porch where we live most of our summertime; we have the uncarpeted floors where germs cannot lurk, already a potential influence on laws of sanitation for the crowded city quarters."

Editorial by W. F. Muse in Mason City Globe Gazette


CRAFTSMAN SERVICE


CRAFTSMAN SERVICE AND HOW TO TAKE ADVANTAGE OF IT

FROM the beginning, one of the chief aims of the Craftsman movement has been to encourage and assist all who are interested in the planning, building and furnishing of simple, economical and permanently comfortable homes. It was with this ideal in mind that Gustav Stickley created Craftsman Furniture, designed Craftsman Houses and published THE CRAFTSMAN Magazine.

Now that the movement has grown and spread—now that men and women all over the country are looking more and more to the Craftsman organization as a source of inspiration and practical help—we feel that the time has come to increase the scope and efficiency of Craftsman Service so that it may be more readily available for a greater number of people.

With this object in view, we have organ-nized, under the head of Craftsman Service for Subscribers, the following departments: Craftsman Architectural Service, Craftsman Real-Estate Service, and Craftsman Landscape and Agricultural Service.

We confine our Service to subscribers not because it is a premium with the subscription, but because we feel that no one who is sincerely in sympathy with the Craftsman movement will want to miss a single copy of the magazine. And so, in writing us, homebuilders and others who wish to avail themselves of our Service will of course send in their subscription to THE CRAFTSMAN.

The magazine itself will prove invaluable to everyone who is interested in home-making, civic improvement, agriculture, general education, arts or handicrafts. And the only way in which readers can really get the benefit of our work and experience along these lines is by keeping in close touch with the magazine, and following its presentation of whatever seems progressive and worth while in any vital phase of life and work.


"THE CRAFTSMAN IS GIVING TO THE AMERICAN PEOPLE A SANE AND SATISFYING PHILOSOPHY OF LIFE AND ITS FUNDAMENTAL LAWS OF BEAUTY."—Columbus (O.) Dispatch.

CRAFTSMAN Service will furnish a reliable source of information for all who are interested in the subjects of which the magazine treats. And the more this Service develops, the more closely shall we be able to coöperate with the thousands of Craftsman subscribers all over the country; their common interests will be cemented, by our organization, into a sort of Craftsman fraternity.

Advice and suggestions will be given without charge whenever possible, on such problems as home-planning and construction, building materials, interior decoration, furnishing and equipment (lighting fixtures, hardware, heating apparatus, etc.), greenhouses, landscape, flower, fruit and vegetable gardens, and other matters pertaining to the home and its surroundings.

The only exception will be in cases where the service required involves the drawing of plans or layouts or work of a similar character. In this event we should naturally have to make a moderate charge, and we should of course advise our correspondent what this would be before we began the work.

All information asked for should be stated as briefly and concisely as possible, and a stamp should be enclosed for reply. When it seems advisable, we will send a blank on which may be filled in whatever information we shall need to enable us to furnish the advice or suggestions desired.

"THE CRAFTSMAN IS CERTAINLY ONE OF THE FINEST MAGAZINES I HAVE SEEN, AND I READ A GOOD MANY OF THEM, AMERICAN, GERMAN AND FRENCH."—E. P., Brooklyn, N. Y.


CRAFTSMAN ARCHITECTURAL SERVICE


CRAFTSMAN ARCHITECTURAL SERVICE

FOR example, if the subscriber is interested in Craftsman architecture, and wishes our aid in the planning and building of his home, the blank sent him will contain questions regarding the general style of house desired, number of rooms, porches and special features, the nature of the site, the amount the owner can afford to spend, the kind of materials and labor available in that locality, and other important details.

When the prospective home-builder is interested in some particular Craftsman house he should state its number and advise us whether the plans would be suitable just as they are or whether they would need to be modified to meet local requirements and individual needs. In the latter event, a list should be made of the various changes desired in the materials, exterior construction and interior arrangement. We will then advise what would be the cost for redrawing the plans and preparing specifications accordingly.

As we have designed and published in THE CRAFTSMAN Magazine over 150 different houses of various sizes and descriptions, ranging from log camps and rustic bungalows for woodland sites to one-, two- and three-story houses for country, suburban and city lots, it is very likely that the subscriber may find among our designs one which will suit his needs, either just as it stands or with a few alterations.

In any case, this collection of designs, combined with our practical experience in planning and building Craftsman houses, makes it possible for us to furnish plans and specifications at much lower cost than could be obtained elsewhere. And naturally, if the house is to be built along Craftsman lines, no one but ourselves is qualified to furnish the proper drawings and instructions.

In every instance, it should be remembered, the main object of our Architectural Service is to enable people to build the kind of homes they want for the lowest possible price.


CRAFTSMAN REAL-ESTATE AND LANDSCAPE SERVICE

CRAFTSMAN REAL-ESTATE SERVICE

IF our subscriber wishes assistance in the selection of a building site or other property, we will send a blank containing questions regarding the kind of land and amount of acreage desired, the purpose for which it is to be used, the amount that can be invested, the location preferred, etc.

On the other hand, if the subscriber has property to sell, we shall provide a blank on which may be entered full details regarding it, for our files, so that we may refer to the owner any of our subscribers who may be looking for property of that description.

When the subscriber has a farm for sale, we will supply a blank on which may be filled in all the necessary details as to the size, nature and location of the property, the kind of soil and crops, average yield per year, nearest market to dispose of products, source of water-supply, quality of roads, improvements installed or available, mortgage if any, and the price and terms on which the owner will sell.


CRAFTSMAN LANDSCAPE AND AGRICULTURAL SERVICE

IF advice is needed on planting, landscape gardening or agriculture, or if the subscriber wishes us to help in the preparation of a garden layout, the blank sent will contain questions as to the style of the house, the size and shape of the grounds, the nature of the soil, the drainage, water-supply and average rainfall, special landscape and architectural features desired, and the amount to be expended in the outdoor development.

In this, as in every other branch of Craftsman Service, we are planning to make our work so efficient and so helpful to our readers all over the country, that our organization will, in itself, be one of the strongest reasons for subscribing to THE CRAFTSMAN Magazine.

"I HAVE NEVER TAKEN A MAGAZINE THAT I HAVE ENJOYED SO THOROUGHLY. IT IS A GREAT DELIGHT TO THE EYE AS WELL AS A FEAST FOR THE MIND."

—L. I. B. Wauwatosa, Wis.


PLANNING A CRAFTSMAN HOME


THE PLANNING OF A TYPICAL CRAFTSMAN HOME

ONE of the interesting and significant things about Craftsman architecture is the fact that the comfort and friendliness for which it has become synonymous are the result of the most practical sort of planning and construction. In fact, they have grown out of our simple arrangement of rooms and sturdy structural features as naturally and inevitably as a flower grows out of the soil.

It may be worth while for those who contemplate the building of new homes or the remodeling of old ones, to note how these qualities have been attained, and what particular features contribute most to the atmosphere of restfulness and charm which is endearing Craftsman houses to the hearts of so many American people.

In the first place, we design our houses as simply, economically and durably as possible, with only such rooms and partitions as seem necessary, with no wasted space, no meaningless ornamentation to catch the dust and add to the housewife's labor.

In laying out our floor plans we try to fill all the family needs for both indoor and outdoor living, with openness enough for the common household life and seclusion enough for individual privacy.

And we endeavor always to make the necessary elements of the construction beautiful as well as useful features of the house, relying for decorative effects upon appropriate design, good proportions, harmonious coloring and the natural interest of the materials used.

As the arrangement of the floor plan must always be of more importance to those who live in it than the appearance of the exterior, we determine first the number, size and location of the various rooms, modifying the plans, of course, wherever necessary, so that the exterior of the building will be pleasing in proportion and outline, as well as suitable for the materials and site.


"JUST A GLANCE THROUGH THE PAGES OF THE CRAFTSMAN MAKES ONE FEEL THAT LIFE IS WORTH LIVING AFTER ALL."

—Wilmington (Del.) Every Evening.


THE CRAFTSMAN DOOR


THE DOOR

THE kind of door chosen for the entrance will depend of course on the style of the house and the personal preference of the owner. For a typical Craftsman home, where a sturdy, unpretentious construction is used throughout, a door of rather simple design would naturally be most in keeping.

The sketch on page 8, which shows the entrance to one of our field-stone houses, gives an example of the sort of door which seems suitable for that particular place. The lower part is made with wood panels and the upper portion is filled by small square panes of leaded glass which light the room within and at the same time add a decorative note to the exterior.

A glance through the views of houses presented in this book will suggest a number of ways in which the design of the door may be varied to suit different conditions and tastes. Sometimes the door may be of plain wood panels, and where it seems desirable one or two rows of amber glass lights may be set across the top. When the door leads into a passageway or hall where a little more light is needed, such construction is useful as well as decorative, and in bedroom doors these small lights are especially attractive, for the amber-colored opalescent glass permits a soft glow of yellow light to penetrate into the hall and at the same time does not destroy the privacy of the room.

When the door opens from a porch or pergola it is a good plan to make it entirely of glass panels, so that as much light as possible will be admitted to the room; for the roof of the porch naturally darkens the windows beneath it a little, and any arrangement that will overcome this objection is welcome.

A glass door is particularly pleasing where there is a vine-clad pergola or an inviting garden beyond, for it permits a full-length vista from the house and gives to the interior a sense of openness and kinship with the outdoor world. Then, too, a door with glass panes adds to the decorative interest of the wall space both outside and in.


THE CRAFTSMAN VESTIBULE

Where the construction is very plain and rugged, the simplest kind of door would be one made of three or four upright boards, joined on the inside by battens. This style seems especially suitable for summer bungalows and rustic camps such as those shown later on in this book.

It will be noticed that all the doors shown in our illustrations are single. We have not yet found any advantage in using double doors, for they are more expensive and not so simple as the single ones, and are apt not to fit tightly enough to prevent draft.


THE VESTIBULE

WHETHER or not a vestibule is to be included in the plan will depend on the sort of climate and exposure for which the house is intended, as well as on the preference of the owner. Where the winters are very mild, or where the entrance is sufficiently sheltered by a recess or by the roof of a porch, a vestibule would be unnecessary; and where the porch is to be glassed in during the cold months, so that one would cross the enclosed porch to enter the hall or living room, a vestibule would not only be superfluous but would be actually in the way. This point, therefore, must be kept in mind when the floor plan is being worked out.

In designing Craftsman houses we usually protect the front door by a recess, a porch or pergola, and omit the vestibule; but the arrangement can always be changed a little to include one where it seems desirable. On the other hand, in modifying a plan so as to cut down the cost of construction, the vestibule, if shown, is usually one of the features that can be eliminated without spoiling the arrangement.

Where there is a vestibule, or where coat hangers are provided on either side of the entry, or a coat closet on one side and a seat on the other, it is always a good plan to place small windows on each side of the front door, for besides lighting the space within they will add a little to the friendliness of the entrance.


"AM RENEWING MY SUBSCRIPTION TO THE CRAFTSMAN—I COULD NOT GET ALONG WITHOUT IT; ESPECIALLY AS WE ARE CONTEMPLATING BUILDING A CRAFTSMAN HOME WITHIN THE YEAR."

—G. W. E., Seattle, Wash.


THE CRAFTSMAN HALL


THE HALL

ONE of the most notable as well as most delightful points about a Craftsman home is the openness of the hall, for we try always to arrange the plan so that on stepping into the house one has a sense of breadth and light and cheerfulness.

In many cases, where the front door is sheltered by a porch, or where a vestibule is provided, the simplest plan is to enter directly into the living room, as one does in Craftsman Bungalows Nos. 116, 118 and 123, shown on pages 68, 70 and 73, in which a separate entrance hall seemed to us unnecessary.


(Continues...)

Excerpted from CRAFTSMAN HOUSE by Gustav Stickley. Copyright © 2009 Dover Publications, Inc.. Excerpted by permission of Dover Publications, Inc..
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Table of Contents

Contents

Title Page,
Bibliographical Note,
Copyright Page,
AN OUTSIDE POINT OF VIEW UPON THE CRAFTSMAN MOVEMENT,
CRAFTSMAN SERVICE,
CRAFTSMAN ARCHITECTURAL SERVICE,
CRAFTSMAN REAL-ESTATE AND LANDSCAPE SERVICE,
PLANNING A CRAFTSMAN HOME,
THE CRAFTSMAN DOOR,
THE CRAFTSMAN VESTIBULE,
THE CRAFTSMAN HALL,
THE FIREPLACE IN A CRAFTSMAN HOME,
THE CRAFTSMAN LIBRARY,
THE CRAFTSMAN DINING ROOM,
THE CRAFTSMAN KITCHEN,
THE CRAFTSMAN BEDROOMS,
CRAFTSMAN BUILT-IN FITTINGS AND WOODWORK,
THE CRAFTSMAN FIREPLACE,
A CRAFTSMAN CEMENT BUNGALOW FOR SUMMER USE,
CRAFTSMAN SHINGLED BUNGALOW WITH ROOMY INTERIOR,
SIX-ROOM CRAFTSMAN COTTAGE FOR NARROW LOT,
INEXPENSIVE CRAFTSMAN BUNGALOW OF CEMENT,
CRAFTSMAN BUNGALOW FOR SIMPLE HOUSEKEEPING,
A SEVEN-ROOM CRAFTSMAN CEMENT HOUSE,
CRAFTSMAN CONCRETE BUNGALOW OF ECONOMICAL DESIGN,
SEVEN-ROOM CRAFTSMAN BUNGALOW FOR COUNTRY SITE,
COMFORTABLE CRAFTSMAN COTTAGE WITH SEVEN ROOMS,
CRAFTSMAN STUCCO HOUSE WITH PORCHES AND BALCONY,
AN EIGHT-ROOM CRAFTSMAN FARMHOUSE,
CRAFTSMAN HOUSE PLANNED FOR MUCH OUTDOOR LIFE,
NINE-ROOM CRAFTSMAN COTTAGE OF BRICK AND SHINGLES,
TWO SHINGLED HOUSES OF TYPICAL CRAFTSMAN DESIGN,
CRAFTSMAN HOUSE WITH INGLENOOK AND BUILT-IN FITTINGS,
ELEVEN-ROOM CRAFTSMAN HOUSE,
TWO-FAMILY CRAFTSMAN CEMENT HOUSE,
HOMES BUILT FROM CRAFTSMAN DESIGNS,
CRAFTSMAN BUILT-IN FITTINGS AND WOODWORK,
A FEW SUGGESTIONS FROM THE CRAFTSMAN WORKSHOPS,
CRAFTSMAN LUSTRE - A Stain, Finish and Polish for all Kinds of Furniture, Woodwork and Floors ...,
CRAFTSMAN FURNITURE,

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