Craftsman Style

Craftsman Style

4.7 4
by Robert Winter, Alexander Vertikoff
     
 
The Arts and Crafts movement arose in England in the late nineteenth century as an impassioned cry against the presumed evils of the Industrial Revolution. Proponents such as William Morris urged an outright revolt against mass-produced, shoddy goods and a return to the honest handcraftsmanship of earlier ages. His key American disciple, a furniture maker named Gustav

Overview

The Arts and Crafts movement arose in England in the late nineteenth century as an impassioned cry against the presumed evils of the Industrial Revolution. Proponents such as William Morris urged an outright revolt against mass-produced, shoddy goods and a return to the honest handcraftsmanship of earlier ages. His key American disciple, a furniture maker named Gustav Stickley, spread these ideals across the country through his magazine, The Craftsman (1901-16). This influential publication lent its name to the American movement. As Robert Winter notes in Craftsman Style, the style here was more rugged -- more craftsmanlike -- than its British counterparts, perfectly in keeping with the nation's lingering frontier ethos.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
The American Craftsman movement, inspired by Englishmen John Ruskin and William Morris, encompassed not only architecture and the decorative arts, but also a nostalgically romantic philosophy, proposing that modernity (starting with the Renaissance) has lead to "materialism and social decay," and that craftsmanship is an antidote to the woes of industrialization. The Craftsman aesthetic flourished in America around the turn of the 20th century and birthed utopian communities as well as architecture and handicrafts. In this opulent book, architectural historian Winter, with the aid of American Bungalow photographer Vertikoff's gorgeous images, presents a comprehensive survey of this quirky movement and its 1960s revival. Winter's interpretation of the Craftsman style is broad, encompassing Bernard Maybeck's gaudy, Tudor/Gothic/Medievalesque Roos House; the dramatic desert- and Native American-inspired structures Mary Elizabeth Jane Colter built in the Grand Canyon; and even Ray Kappe's "soft modernist" house as well as the more familiar California Swiss/Japanese bungalows, quasi-Tudor mansions and charming artists' communities in Pennsylvania and upstate New York. The book ends with a grand finale: the new Disney Grand California Hotel, in itself a kind of Craftsman museum, with a different Craftsman style interpreted in each suite. An erudite introduction provides novices with enough background to enjoy the book, and an extensive bibliography gives enough information for readers to further pursue the Craftsman aesthetic. 255 illus. (July)n Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780810943360
Publisher:
Abrams, Harry N., Inc.
Publication date:
05/01/2004
Pages:
240
Product dimensions:
9.62(w) x 11.50(h) x 1.00(d)

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Craftsman Style 4.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Asosa More than 1 year ago
After months of searching for a book that captured the Craftsman period to my liking, I had just about given up until I happened to come across this copy at my local B&N. The photos are fabulous, and it describes the general summary of the period. I loved that the book included the Craftsman District of Pasadena, and the Grand California hotel in Downtown Disney- both superb examples of the Arts and Crafts period. Now, if I can only find a book that captures Victorian architecture as well, I'd be set!
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