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Crazy '08: How a Cast of Cranks, Rogues, Boneheads, and Magnates Created the Greatest Year in Baseball History

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Overview

Crazy '08 recounts the 1908 season—the year when Peerless Leader Frank Chance's men went toe to toe with John McGraw and Christy Mathewson's New York Giants and Honus Wagner's Pittsburgh Pirates in the greatest pennant race the National League has ever seen. The American League had its own three-cornered pennant fight, and players like Cy Young, Ty Cobb, Walter Johnson and the egregiously crooked Hal Chase ensured that the junior circuit had its moments.

Simply put, 1908 is the ...

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Crazy '08

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Overview

Crazy '08 recounts the 1908 season—the year when Peerless Leader Frank Chance's men went toe to toe with John McGraw and Christy Mathewson's New York Giants and Honus Wagner's Pittsburgh Pirates in the greatest pennant race the National League has ever seen. The American League had its own three-cornered pennant fight, and players like Cy Young, Ty Cobb, Walter Johnson and the egregiously crooked Hal Chase ensured that the junior circuit had its moments.

Simply put, 1908 is the year that baseball grew up. Oh, and it was the last time the Cubs won the World Series.

Destined to be as memorable as the season it documents, Crazy '08 sets a new standard for what a book about baseball can be.

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Editorial Reviews

George F. Will
Readers of Crazy ’08 can almost smell the whiskey and taste the pigs’ knuckles. This rollicking tour of that season will entertain readers interested in social history, will fascinate students of baseball and will cause today’s Cub fans to experience an unaccustomed feeling — pride — as their team enters the 2007 season, the 99th season of its rebuilding effort.
— The New York Times
Publishers Weekly

It's been almost a century since the loopy shenanigans of 1908 that produced what Fortunemagazine editor Cait Murphy calls "the year that baseball comes of age," but the resultant drama has hardly faded with time. Although baseball books tend to sag with nostalgia, Murphy's wisecracking yarn digs right into the era's brawling, vivid ugliness with little regard for such niceties, and is all the better for it. Her book is so rife with corruption, greed, stupidity and downright weirdness that it makes today's sport of sanctimony and clean behavior look positively sleepy in comparison. This isn't surprising, given that 1908 was not just the last year that the shockingly victorious Chicago Cubs made it to the World Series, but also the year when a game would be called a tie through sheer Rashomon-like confusion and when a game day riot would take the lives of two people. The titanic matches between the rival Cubs and New York Giants are thrilling enough, but what really makes Murphy's book an addictive pleasure is the joy the author takes in the colorful asides where she fills in the chaotic blanks of an America discovering not just the joy of its national pastime but its very character. (Mar.)

Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information
Library Journal

With adroitness and flair, Murphy (Fortunemagazine) revisits this fantastic season in baseball history, which has been certainly studied and celebrated before but never with her skill. This was a year with such driving forces as Ty Cobb, Honus Wagner, Napoleon Lajoie, Christy Mathewson, and an aging Cy Young. And it was the last time the Cubs won the series. Murphy mixes irreverence, insight, and erudition to produce this treat.

Entertainment Weekly
A penetrating look at the dead-ball era, when the game truly was the national pastime. A-
Raleigh News & Observer
“[W]orthy to stand alongside The Glory of Their Times..., out in front.”
New York Times Book Review
“[A] rollicking tour... will fascinate students of baseball... cause today’s Cub fans to experience an unaccustomed feeling—-pride...”
Washington Times
"If you are any kind of fan, you ought to relish and revel in this wonderful book"
Wall Street Journal
“Entertaining and meticulously researched.”
Chicago Tribune
Crazy ’08 is simply a delight, required reading for all fans of baseball in Chicago.
Sports Illustrated
"picturesque details are what make...Crazy ‘08 such a fun and revealing journey through the early days of baseball."
—Chicago Tribune
Crazy ’08 is simply a delight, required reading for all fans of baseball in Chicago.
—Washington Times
“If you are any kind of fan, you ought to relish and revel in this wonderful book”
—Entertainment Weekly
A penetrating look at the dead-ball era, when the game truly was the national pastime. A-
—Sports Illustrated
“picturesque details are what make...Crazy ‘08 such a fun and revealing journey through the early days of baseball.”
--Chicago Tribune
Crazy ’08 is simply a delight, required reading for all fans of baseball in Chicago.
--Washington Times
“If you are any kind of fan, you ought to relish and revel in this wonderful book”
--Entertainment Weekly
A penetrating look at the dead-ball era, when the game truly was the national pastime. A-
--Sports Illustrated
“picturesque details are what make...Crazy ‘08 such a fun and revealing journey through the early days of baseball.”
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780060889371
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 3/13/2007
  • Pages: 384
  • Sales rank: 1,410,600
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 1.50 (d)

Meet the Author

Cait Murphy is the author of Crazy '08: How a Cast of Cranks, Rogues, Boneheads, and Magnates Created the Greatest Year in Baseball History and has worked at Fortune, the Economist, and the Wall Street Journal Asia in Hong Kong. She lives in New York City.

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Read an Excerpt

Chapter One

The Hot Stove League

Then it's hats off to Old Mike Donlin
To Wagner, Lajoie, and Cobb . . .
Don't forget Hal Chase and foxy Mr. Chance
Who are always on the job . . .
Good old Cy Young we root for,
And Fielder Jones the same . . .
And we hold first place in our Yankee hearts
For the Stars of the National Game.—performed on vaudeville by
Mabel Hite and Mike Donlin1

small minds might check the schedule and conclude that the 1908 season begins on Opening Day, April 14. They would be wrong. The 1908 season began the instant that the last Detroit batter popped up for the last out of the 1907 World Series.

Having lost to the mighty Cubs 4-zip (with one tie), the Tigers limped home to lick their wounds. Their poor performance was particularly galling since they had shown true grit down the stretch, beating the Philadelphia Athletics in a pennant race that the New York Times called the "greatest struggle in the history of baseball." Hyberbole was as common as bad poetry on the sports pages in 1907, but the Times just might have had it right—albeit only for a year.

The turning point came in late September. The Tigers had ridden a five-game winning streak to overtake the A's. As they faced a three-game series in Philadelphia—already known for its aggressive fans—Detroit was anything but complacent. The series would go a long way toward settling matters one way or the other. The Tigers won the first game, then a rainout and a Sunday—the city of brotherly love did not allow ball games on the Sabbath—meant the clubs wouldplay a doubleheader on Monday, September 30. In the event, only a single game was played—a seventeen-inning classic.

The A's jumped out to a 7–1 lead after six innings and Rube Waddell, the game's finest left-hander, was cruising. But he lost his fastball, or perhaps his concentration—the Rube was not wonderfully well-endowed mentally—and the Tigers scrapped for four runs in the seventh, then one more in the eighth. In the top of the ninth, they trailed 8–6. Slugger Sam Crawford led off with a single; the next batter was Ty Cobb. The 1907 season was the twenty-year-old's breakout year—as it was, not coincidentally, for the Tigers. Cobb led the league in hits, average, runs batted in, and stolen bases while confirming his reputation as a young man as distasteful off the field as he was wondrous on it. He dug in, took a strike—and cracked a home run over the right field wall. Tie game.

The Tigers scored a run in the top of the tenth; the A's did the same in the bottom. The game went on; the light thickened; the tension built.

In the bottom of the fourteenth, Detroit's Sam Crawford drifted back to catch a fly in an outfield that was packed with fans; Columbia Park had seats for only fifteen thousand, and the grass was roped off to provide standing room for thousands more. As Crawford reached for the ball, a couple of cops crowded him, either to keep the throng back or to help the A's, depending on one's view of human nature. At any rate, Crawford dropped the ball. The A's had a man in scoring position—briefly. Detroit argued that the cops had interfered with Crawford. There ensued a few minutes of civilized colloquy, marked by only a single arrest (of Detroit infielder Claude Rossman) and a trivial riot. Bravely, umpire Silk O'Loughlin decided against Philly, calling the batter out.

What becomes known as the "when-a-cop-took-a-stroll play"2 loomed large when the next hitter hit a long single, but, of course, there was no man on second to score. No one else did, either. At the end of seventeen, the umps ended the game on account of darkness. The box score called it a tie, but the Tigers felt as if they had won. The A's were certain that they wuz robbed. Manager Connie Mack, a kindly man, was uncharacteristically bitter: "If there ever was such a thing as crooked baseball, today's game would stand as a good example."3

The controversial tie turned the season. The A's had lost their best chance to track down the Tigers, who promptly ripped off five straight wins on their way to the pennant. Delighted with the team's first championship in twenty years, Detroit's happy multitudes celebrated by lighting bonfires and painting their pooches in tiger stripes.4

To flop against the Cubs after all that—well, it hurt.

The Cubs, of course, were exultant. They had gone into 1907 determined to erase the insult of losing the 1906 World Series to the crosstown White Sox, a team they considered—and probably was—inferior. The Cubs played well all year, finishing ahead of the second-place Pirates by seventeen games and twenty-five ahead of the New York Giants, their least-favorite team—a deeply satisfying result to the Cubs, and a mortifying one to the Gothamites. By finishing off 1907 with such élan, the Cubs restored their sense of superiority. They strutted home for the winter, their wallets engorged with their World Series winnings: $2,142.5

Just because the games are over, though, does not mean that the game is. Baseball never sleeps; instead, it huddles around the metaphorical hot stove to rehash the past and dicker about the future. Even in the depths of winter, there is always a thrumming pulse of wakefulness—deals to make, rules to refine, lies to swap, mangers to fire. At the February 1908 annual meeting of the National League, the air at the Waldorf-Astoria fairly reeks of smoke and self-congratulation. Baseball is "in a most prosperous and healthy condition," concludes NL president Harry Pulliam in his annual report. "My experience as president of your organization has been a very pleasant one during the last summer."6 Given what would happen to Pulliam in 1908–1909, the words are desperately poignant. Sporting Life, a weekly magazine that was a reliable barometer of what the bosses were thinking, is also sunny: "There is not one cloud in sight."7

Crazy '08
How a Cast of Cranks, Rogues, Boneheads, and Magnates Created the Greatest Year in Baseball History
. Copyright © by Cait Murphy. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.
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Table of Contents

Acknowledgments     ix
Foreword   Robert Creamer     xi
Introduction     xiii
The Hot Stove League     1
Land of the Giants     15
Origins of a Dynasty     35
Chicago on the Make     49
Opening Days     57
The Murder Farm     72
The Great Sorting     79
Heat and Dust     97
Doubleday and Doubletalk     129
The Guns of August     135
The Dog Days     151
Baseball's Invisible Men     167
The Merkle Game     177
That Other Pennant Race     199
The Red Peril and the Red Priestess     225
Down to the Wire: The National League     233
The Merkle Game II     257
Curses!     273
Covering the Bases     277
Epilogue     289
Sources     301
Notes     323
Index     361
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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing all of 16 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 23, 2008

    Its only been 100 years

    One of the best baseball books I have read. She gives you a great insight as to what was going on in 1908 on and off the field.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 10, 2012

    SOLID WORK OF BASEBALL HISTORY

    Cait Murphy does a great job of bringing you back to 1908 when baseball truly was the American pastime. The names that were at the back of your mind in baseball history like Honus Wagner, Tinker,Evers,Chance, and many others will become living,breathing people. One of the better baseball books that I have read.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 11, 2011

    Excellent baseball book

    Great stories of Three Finger Brown and others in a different and crazy era

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