Crazy Horse and Custer: The Epic Clash of Two Great Warriors at the Little Bighorn

( 28 )

Overview

Crazy Horse, leader of the Oglala Sioux, and General George Armstrong Custer of the Seventh Calvary, were cultural opposites, but they led uncannily parallel lives. Born at the same time, they both became leaders at very early ages, were stripped of power, and in disgrace worked to earn back the respect of their people. Above all, Crazy Horse and Custer were men of supreme courage, natural-born leaders. On the morning of 25 June 1876, the paths of these two great men collided in an epic battle on the banks of the...
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Overview

Crazy Horse, leader of the Oglala Sioux, and General George Armstrong Custer of the Seventh Calvary, were cultural opposites, but they led uncannily parallel lives. Born at the same time, they both became leaders at very early ages, were stripped of power, and in disgrace worked to earn back the respect of their people. Above all, Crazy Horse and Custer were men of supreme courage, natural-born leaders. On the morning of 25 June 1876, the paths of these two great men collided in an epic battle on the banks of the Little Bighorn. It was an inevitable clash between two men, two societies and two ways of life.

Set against the backdrop of the open prairie, Crazy Horse and Custer is the story of these heroes; and adventure full of bravery, military genius and pathos. Stephen E. Ambrose, the highly-acclaimed historian, skillfully brings to life this pivotal moment in the history of the Wild West.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781615590667
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster UK Ltd
  • Publication date: 7/9/2009
  • Pages: 527
  • Product dimensions: 5.10 (w) x 7.60 (h) x 1.60 (d)

Meet the Author

Stephen E. Ambrose
An historian whose books prompted America to regard its war veterans with newfound reverence, Stephen E. Ambrose was as prolific as he was passionate about his country. His bestsellers chronicled our nation’s critical battles and achievements, from his seminal war works D-Day and Band of Brothers to his fitting last love letter To America.

Biography

"I was ten years old when [World War II] ended," Stephen Ambrose once said. "I thought the returning veterans were giants who had saved the world from barbarism. I still think so." Years after he first watched combat footage in the newsreels, the popular historian brought fresh attention to America's aging WWII veterans through such bestselling books as Band of Brothers, about a company of U.S. paratroopers, and The Wild Blue, about the B-24 bomber pilots who flew over Germany. Though best known for his books on World War II, Ambrose also produced multi-volume biographies of Dwight Eisenhower and Richard Nixon, a history of the building of the transcontinental railroad, and a fascinating account of the Lewis and Clark expedition across the American West.

As a young professor of history, Ambrose was one of many left-wing academics who spoke out against American involvement in the Vietnam War. Yet he revered the veterans of World War II, and he interviewed and wrote about them at a time when many of his colleagues considered military history old-fashioned. "The men I admire most are soldiers, sailors, professional military," Ambrose would later tell The Washington Post. "Way more than politicians."

He labored without much popular acclaim or academic renown until 1994, when his book D-Day June 6, 1944: The Climactic Battle of World War II burst onto the bestseller lists. War heroism was suddenly a hot topic, and Ambrose's approach, which focused on the experiences of soldiers rather than the decisions of high command, was perfectly suited to a popular audience. More bestsellers followed, including Citizen Soldiers, The Victors and Undaunted Courage. Ambrose's vivid narrative accounts were devoured by readers and praised by critics. "The descriptions of individual ordeals on the bloody beach of Omaha make this book outstanding," wrote Raleigh Trevelyan in a New York Times review of D-Day.

Ambrose retired as a professor of history at the University of New Orleans in 1995, but he continued to write one or more books per year. He also founded the National D-Day Museum in New Orleans, worked with his family-owned business organizing historical tours, and served as the historical consultant for the 1998 Steven Spielberg film Saving Private Ryan. Spielberg later turned Ambrose's Band of Brothers into an HBO miniseries.

This rise to fame was accompanied by criticism from some of Ambrose's fellow historians, who charged that he could be careless in his research and editing. In early 2002, he faced accusations of plagiarism when reporters noted that a number of phrases and sentences in his books were lifted from other works. Ambrose responded that he had forgotten to place quotation marks around some quotes, but said he had footnoted all his sources. "I always thought plagiarism meant using another person's words and ideas, pretending they were your own and profiting from it. I do not do that, never have done that and never will," he wrote in a statement on his Web site.

When he was diagnosed with lung cancer a few months later, he began work on a memoir, To America. "I want to tell all the things that are right about America," he said in an interview with the Associated Press. Ambrose died in October 2002, at the age of 66.

Good To Know

Ambrose was a star football player at the University of Wisconsin and played in the Rose Bowl, according to his friend and co-author Douglas Brinkley.

As a college sophomore, Ambrose abandoned his pre-med major for history after he attended a class on "Representative Americans" taught by professor William Hesseltine.

For more than 20 years, Ambrose and his family spent their vacations traveling portions of the Lewis and Clark Trail. They canoed the Missouri and Columbia rivers, endured soaking rains and summer snowstorms, and read from the explorers' journals at night by the light of their campfires.

Ambrose named his house in Mississippi "Merry Weather," after Meriwether Lewis. His Labrador was called Pomp, after the nickname of Sacagawea's son.

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    1. Also Known As:
      Stephen Ambrose
    1. Date of Birth:
      January 10, 1936
    2. Place of Birth:
      Whitewater, Wisconsin
    1. Date of Death:
      October 13, 2002
    2. Place of Death:
      Bay St. Louis, Mississippi

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 28 )
Rating Distribution

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(14)

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(11)

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(1)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 28 Customer Reviews
  • Posted April 16, 2012

    Crazy Horse and Custer weaves together the story of two men who

    Crazy Horse and Custer weaves together the story of two men who came from very different backgrounds to meet at one historic battle. I had not read much about American Indians prior to this and was fascinated by the stories about their culture, hero’s and spirituality. Unfortunately this book also documents a time in American history that shows some of the atrocities of the U.S. Government and how they took advantage of the situation. This book is a learning experience told through great storytelling.

    Stephen Ambrose had a great talent for weaving together historical facts into a story that reads like a novel. It was an enjoyable journey from beginning to end and has prompted an interest beyond the book to go visit the sites and places these events took place at.

    As one last note, I also found this book interesting as a narrative on manhood. This book looks at the lives of two boys, who became admired men in their culture, and tells us how they got there, what motivated them and the people around them who influenced them in different ways. Boys, men and fathers may find interesting bits of wisdom hidden in these pages.

    6 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 6, 2004

    What He Said

    The previous reviewer summed it up very well. Ambrose also does an excellent job of conveying the political climate of the time and the overwhelming desire of the U.S. Government to realize its Manifest Destiny. Extensively researched, Ambrose also opens a window for the reader into the life of the Souix during the Indian Wars. Neither pro-Government nor pro-Native American, Ambrose allows the reader to make his/her determination as to the rights and the wrongs in the struggle for dominion over the Plains.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 1, 2000

    You can't go wrong with a book by Stephen Ambrose

    This is the second book by Ambrose that I have read. He does an excellent job of comparing and contrasting Crazy Horse's and Custer's lives. He builds the feeling of despair that the Sioux must have felt as they realized that their homeland would not much longer be theirs. He describes Custers rashness so clearly that it is plain to see how he orchestrated his own demise. Don't pass this one up.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 12, 2014

    Crazy Horse and Custer

    This book should be required reading in high school. The story goes indepth about the life of Chief Crazy Horse and General Custer. More than a biography it shows the struggles of the American Indians and the politics of the US Goverment. I decided to read the book because I was interested in Custer, but I became a fan of Chief Crazy Horse. Much research was done in writing the book. The story is very exciting and will hold your attention. You will not be able to put the book down. This is a book worth reading! A+++++

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 3, 2013

    Awesome

    Loved this book. Compares and contrasts Custer and Crazy Horse. Definitely have more respect for the people of those times.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 24, 2013

    Great book!

    Great book!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 24, 2013

    VERY INFORMATIVE BOOK

    I GREATLY ENJOYED READING THIS BOOK. I THOUGHT THE BOOK WAS VERY WELL WRITTEN AND I WAS REALLY AMAZED HOW CLOSE THE TWO MEN WERE RELATED IN THEIR LIFES.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 16, 2013

    Great history. Sad, but compelling story. This is the history we

    Great history. Sad, but compelling story. This is the history we weren't taught in school. Very informative.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 5, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    wonderful

    I found this book a must read if you are interested in the progress of America.Ambrose does it again after "Undaunted Courage". His descriptions of the land,buffalo and the main characters make you feel like you are right there. You feel Crazy Horse's hopelessness at the end of an era.Great book!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 4, 2009

    Great Book!

    This book was well researched and written. I would highly recommend this book to anyone that has a love of the West, Custer and Crazy Horse.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 12, 2004

    A look into the past

    This was an excellent book to read. It was filled with information about the Sioux Indians and Custer. It is a must book to read if you are interested in the relationship between the US Army and the Sioux Indians.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 8, 2004

    simply a great read of two american hero's

    Although heavily reserched and containing pages of referances and footnotes, Ambrose once again writes a book that makes you feel comfortable to read, as it is extreemly accessable to almost anyone interested in american history and the countries search for its Manifest Destiny

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 30, 2013

    Whats "howrse"?

    Yeah. Look up.

    0 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 5, 2013

    Pokemon sucks!!!!!

    (•) :) :( :D :-( :-)

    0 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 23, 2012

    All Pokemon 5

    81. Ninjask- the quick fly Pokemon. You can find Ninjask around food, but look fast. It moves so quickly that it is virtually unoticeable. 82. Noctowl- the owl Pokemon. Even in the most minimal levels of light, Noctowl can use its super sharp eyesight to find objects. It is a silent flier. 83. Octillery- the jet Pokemon. Octillery uses its suction cups to grip its prey, which it finds among gaps in the sea floor. It can lash out with its tentacles. 84. Omanyte- the spiral shell Pokemon. Omanyte can hide within its large, heavy shell. It catches prey by gripping tightly with its arms. 85. Pachirisu- the electric squirrel Pokemon. Pachirisu lives atop trees and will create electrified fur balls that it hides along with collected berries. It shoots electricity from its tail. 86. Paras- the mushroom Pokemon. Paras grows two large mushrooms from its back. They grow along with it. 87. Pelipper- the pelican Pokemon. Pelipper with gather up prey in its mouth by dipping its large bill into the water. It can also be trained to deliver mail. 88. Perisian- the classy cat Pokemon. A very snobby Pokemon, the jewel on its head is usually the topic of conversation. Rich folk love to keep Perisian as pets. 89. Pidgeotto- the bird Pokemon. Pidgeotto is very territorial, and will take down prey with razor sharp claws. It whips wind with its wings. 90. Piplup- the young penguin Pokemon. Piplup can dive in icy northern waters for ten minutes at a time. It is too proud to accept food from humans. 91. Politoed- the frog Pokemon. This natural leader rallies others to its cause. When Politoed cries, others seem to obey it. 92. Ponyta- the fire horse Pokemon. This stunning Pokemon has a fiery mane and tail that grow out right after birth. Ponyta's hooves are as hard as diamonds, and it can run 180 miles per hour, trampling anything flat. 93. Primeape- the ferocious monkey Pokemon. If you look into its eyes, you can run or fight. Primeape will deliver a ferocious beating. 94. Prinplup- the penguin Pokemon. Prinplup looks for prey in icy waters and will use its wings to break the thickest of trees. It's a loner Pokemon, because each one believes it is the most important. 95. Psyduck- the duck Pokemon. When Psyduck's headaches become unbearable, it will use weird powers. It never can remember those powers later. 96. Purugly- the tiger cat Pokemon. Purugly will make itself appear bulkier by squeezing its two tails around its waist. It is known to take over other Pokemon's nests. 97. Quilfish- the balloon Pokemon. Although not a very good swimmer due to its corpulent form, Qwuilfish is still capable of using its poison spines to defeat its foes. 98. Raticate- the hamster Pokemon. The teeth on Raticate aren't just for decoration. It whittles its fangs by gnawing on hard material, and its teeth have the power to gnaw through cinderblock walls. 99. Rattata- the mouse Pokemon. A common rodent, Rattata is a survivor, able to live in almost any extreme enviroment. Don't let its small size fool you. 100. Relicanth- the longetivity Pokemon. This rare Pokemon was discovered during a deep sea exploration. Relicanth has remained unchanged for over one hundred million years.

    0 out of 19 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 17, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 1, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 29, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 15, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 19, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

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