Crazy: A Father's Search Through America's Mental Health Madness

( 18 )

Overview


Former Washington Post reporter Pete Earley had written extensively about the criminal justice system. But it was only when his own son-in the throes of a manic episode-broke into a neighbor's house that he learned what happens to mentally ill people who break a law.

This is the Earley family's compelling story, a troubling look at bureaucratic apathy and the countless thousands who suffer confinement instead of care, brutal conditions instead of treatment, in the "revolving ...

See more details below
Paperback
$14.54
BN.com price
(Save 9%)$16.00 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (47) from $1.99   
  • New (14) from $8.91   
  • Used (33) from $1.99   
Crazy: A Father's Search Through America's Mental Health Madness

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK Study
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$12.99
BN.com price

Overview


Former Washington Post reporter Pete Earley had written extensively about the criminal justice system. But it was only when his own son-in the throes of a manic episode-broke into a neighbor's house that he learned what happens to mentally ill people who break a law.

This is the Earley family's compelling story, a troubling look at bureaucratic apathy and the countless thousands who suffer confinement instead of care, brutal conditions instead of treatment, in the "revolving doors" between hospital and jail. With mass deinstitutionalization, large numbers of state mental patients are homeless or in jail-an experience little better than the horrors of a century ago. Earley takes us directly into that experience-and into that of a father and award-winning journalist trying to fight for a better way.

RunTime: 12 hrs, 1 CD. * Mp3 CD Format *. Pete Earley had no idea. He'd been a journalist for over thirty years, and the author of several award-winning---even bestselling---nonfiction books about crime and punishment and society. Yet he'd always been on the outside looking in. He had no idea what it was like to be on the inside looking out until his son, Mike, was declared mentally ill, and Earley was thrown headlong into the maze of contradictions, disparities, and catch-22s that is America's mental health system." "Crazy" is a godsend. It will open the minds of many who make choices for the mentally ill. Countless numbers of us owe Pete Earley and his son, Mike, a great debt."---Patty Duke

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Suffering delusions from bipolar disorder, Mike Earley broke into a stranger's home to take a bubble bath and significantly damaged the premises. That Mike's act was viewed as a crime rather than a psychotic episode spurred his father, veteran journalist Pete Earley (Family of Spies), to investigate the "criminalization of the mentally ill." Earley gains access to the Miami-Dade County jail where guards admit that they routinely beat prisoners. He learns that Deidra Sanbourne, whose 1988 deinstitutionalization was a landmark civil rights case, died after being neglected in a boarding house. A public defender describes how he-not always happily-helps mentally ill clients avoid hospitalization. Throughout this grim work, Earley uneasily straddles the line between father and journalist. He compromises his objectivity when for most of his son's ordeal-Mike gets probation-he refuses to entertain the possibility that the terrified woman whose home Mike trashed also is a victim. And when, torn between opposing obligations, he decides not to reveal to a source's mother that her daughter has gone off her medications, he endangers the daughter's life and betrays her mother. Although this is mostly a sprawling retread of more significant work by psychologist Fuller Torrey and others, parents of the mentally ill should find solace and food for thought in its pages. (Apr.) Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Library Journal
Like Paul Raeburn in Acquainted with the Night: A Parent's Quest To Understand Depression and Bipolar Disorder in His Children, former Washington Post reporter Earley (Witsec: Inside the Federal Witness Protection Program) penetrates the American mental health system in an effort to discover how he can save his son, Mike, who was diagnosed with bipolar disorder after suffering a breakdown during his senior year in college. Mike's situation escalates when, delusional, he breaks into a home to take a bubble bath and runs up against the criminal justice system. Appalled by the barbarous illogicality of laws that allow mentally ill people like Mike to be punished yet languish untreated, Earley visits prisons, courthouses, hospitals, and assisted-living facilities to explore his options and to expose "mental health madness." In particular, he criticizes the deinsitutionalization movement that released masses of the mentally ill from hospitals and abandoned them to the streets. He also advocates the reform of laws that permit mentally ill patients to refuse treatment and/or medication, even though illness impedes their ability to make competent decisions regarding their own health. Highly recommended for all public and university collections.-Lynne Maxwell, Villanova Univ. Sch. of Law Lib., PA Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Seasoned investigative journalist Earley (Super Casino, 2000, etc.) splices together the story of his son's alarming brush with the law and a report on our society's criminalization of the mentally ill. The author was so upset by what happened to his son after he was arrested for breaking into a house while in a delusional state that he set out to discover just how the mental-health system works in America today. What he found is that the new insane asylums are prisons, neither safe nor humane places. In Miami-the city was chosen for Earley's investigation because it has a high percentage of mentally ill residents-the author was given wide access to the Miami-Dade County Jail. He spent a year there observing how mentally ill prisoners are treated. He followed their cases through the courts and traced their progress once they were back on the streets. Earley also interviewed a Miami judge, lawyers, psychiatrists, patient advocates and the founder of a halfway house. He draws a bleak and disturbing picture. The closing of state mental hospitals that began in the 1960s left most patients homeless and without access to the community services that were supposed to form their new safety net, he reports; by the 1990s, jails and prisons were being swamped by psychotic prisoners. Society has gone backwards in it handling of the mentally ill, he argues, and we must develop modern long-term treatment facilities where they can be helped and kept safe. The author's own frustrating experience with his son convinced him that commitment laws are heavily biased in favor of patients' civil rights and against intervention and treatment; he urges bringing doctors and patients' loved ones back into thedecision-making process. An urgent plea for change that gains force by putting a human face on a sociological problem.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780425213896
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA) Incorporated
  • Publication date: 4/3/2007
  • Pages: 384
  • Sales rank: 113,197
  • Product dimensions: 6.12 (w) x 9.03 (h) x 1.01 (d)

Meet the Author


Pete Earley, a former reporter for The Washington Post, is the author of seven works of nonfiction, including the bestsellers The Hot House and Family of Spies, and the multi-award-winning Circumstantial Evidence. According to the Washingtonian magazine, he is one of ten journalist/authors in America "who have the power to introduce new ideas and give them currency." Earley is also the author of two novels.
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 18 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(12)

4 Star

(4)

3 Star

(1)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(1)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 18 Customer Reviews
  • Posted December 18, 2011

    Why we fight ...

    I just finished reading his book. It took me a few months to get up the strength to do it. Having read a few books about this difficult subject I knew this would not be an uplifting, easy read. This was a very good reminder why I am fighting so hard and why I need to keep fighting for my son until the day I die. I tell myself quit whining, this is the new normal. I¿m always asking myself what will be my next goal to help my son; unfortunately no one is really available to consult. Yes, a lot of people think they know better and hand out advice, but they are not there when the tough decisions have to be made, these are almost always made alone in the dark. This book is a great reminder not to give up. Wishing everyone reading this that they will never, never have to personally experience the frustration, heplessness, anger and exhaustion in dealing with a system that is stacked against the seriously mentally ill.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 16, 2007

    Excellent, but disturbing book.

    Having worked within the mental health system for years, I found this book interesting, but also, unfortunately, just a confirmation of what I have been watching throughout my career. Our system is very broken! A review on the back cover of the book indicates that this is a great book for families 'of seriously mentally ill people' to read - but the reality is that, while they may find the book interesting, they aren't the ones who need to read it - they live it every day. It's our lawmakers and 'human rights advocates' who need to read it, as they are who can influence the changes that need to be made.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 13, 2012

    Highly Recommended

    Pete Earley has written a frighteningly accurate account of how the mentally ill are treated in our society. As someone in the field, I found it accurate and overwhelmingly sad. Not only are the rights and care of those with mental illness really not being provided for, neither are those of the average citizen to be safe from those with mental illness and violent tendencies. It's a lose-lose for all of us. Loved the book even though it's heartbreaking.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 30, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Posted April 24, 2011

    what a great book

    very personal look at not only our system of dealing with mental illness in America, but how it affects a family. Nobody should ever have to know the pain associated with these illnesses, and the sadness that comes with the process of attempting to parent through it.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 20, 2009

    A challenge to all of us

    This book describes the difficulties that many people with mental illness have. It details the challenge that some mentally ill people experience with the criminal justice system. Our criminal justice system does not always have adequate facilities and treatment for the many often untreated mentally ill who end up arrested and charged with crimes. Sometimes the mental illness prevent good judgement or even awareness of how the event breaks the law. As a mental health professional who is involved with a local jail I found it described our local situation at least in part.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 27, 2007

    Great look into the world of mental illness!

    This book is so well written, so interesting, and such an inspiring yet, angering book. A look into the criminalization of the mentally ill should get anyone and everyone thinking about how we treat those that are suffering. Great job Mr. Earley, I plan on reading more of your books!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 9, 2006

    Amazing account of America's Mental Health system

    This book is well written and very informative. If you work with the mentally ill or want to learn more about the mental heatlh system this is the book to read. This is a great book for someone who is just learning about mental health and those who already know something.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 3, 2006

    Excellent Insight

    I absolutely loved this book. I only stopped reading it when I slept and was at work (even then I sneaked a chapter in). If you're interested in Mental Illiness as much as I am, you'll love this.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 25, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 14, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 17, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 22, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 28, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 3, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 11, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 29, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 22, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 18 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)