BN.com Gift Guide

Crazy Rich: Power, Scandal, and Tragedy Inside the Johnson & Johnson Dynasty

( 22 )

Overview

From the founders of the international health-care behemoth Johnson & Johnson in the late 1800s to the contemporary Johnsons of today, such as billionaire New York Jets owner Robert Wood "Woody" Johnson IV, all is revealed in this scrupulously researched, unauthorized biography by New York Times bestselling author Jerry Oppenheimer. Often compared to the Kennedy clan because of the tragedies and scandals that had befallen both wealthy and powerful families, Crazy Rich, based on scores of exclusive, ...

See more details below
Paperback
$12.63
BN.com price
(Save 29%)$17.99 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (22) from $5.08   
  • New (12) from $9.90   
  • Used (10) from $5.08   
Crazy Rich: Power, Scandal, and Tragedy Inside the Johnson & Johnson Dynasty

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$9.99
BN.com price

Overview

From the founders of the international health-care behemoth Johnson & Johnson in the late 1800s to the contemporary Johnsons of today, such as billionaire New York Jets owner Robert Wood "Woody" Johnson IV, all is revealed in this scrupulously researched, unauthorized biography by New York Times bestselling author Jerry Oppenheimer. Often compared to the Kennedy clan because of the tragedies and scandals that had befallen both wealthy and powerful families, Crazy Rich, based on scores of exclusive, candid, on-the-record interviews, reveals how the  dynasty's vast fortune was both intoxicating and toxic through the generations of a family that gave the world Band-Aids and Baby Oil. At the same time, they've been termed perhaps the most dysfunctional family in the fortune 500. Oppenheimer is the author of biographies of the Kennedys, the Clintons, the Hiltons and Martha Stewart, among other American icons.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble

To call Johnson & Johnson a corporate giant is a radical understatement: With revenues of 65 billion dollars a year and assets exceeding 113 billion dollars, this medical and pharmaceutical behemoth continues to thrive despite numerous scandals and several huge payment settlements. This unauthorized book by astute watcher of the rich famous Jerry Oppenheimer (Madoff with the Money; Martha Stewart) bares the savvy business strategies and gnarly legal struggles of this firm, but it will keep many readers turning pages even more eagerly with its accounts of Johnson family marriage drama and personal scandals. A ripe history of "the most dysfunctional family in the Fortune 500."

Publishers Weekly
In his latest breathless tell-all, Oppenheimer (author of unauthorized biographies of Martha Stewart, the Hilton family, Anna Wintour, and others) trains his gaze on the Johnsons, the cursed Kennedies of pharmaceuticals—a family who, with every generation, find themselves at the center of celebrity and political scandal. From the very start, the Johnson clan courted controversy by smashing rivals and famously stealing Florence Nightingale's logo for the Red Cross. Since then, they've been plagued by misery, corruption, and misfortune (despite amassing a substantial fortune). Oppenheimer provides a wealth of salacious and sometimes tragic material—from Casey Johnson's recent breakdown and death, to the parade of outlandish characters who have married into the family (including the housekeeper-turned-dowager Barbara Piasecka Johnson, who died this past April 1) and the transformation of Robert "Woody" Johnson IV from playboy to Republican powerbroker, football mogul, and philanthropist. The book is an impressive example of journalistic synthesis, bringing together bits of tabloid journalism not usually connected (playing celebrity connect-the-dots is half the book's fun) around a strong narrative core. The lurid, occasionally clumsy writing is matched by a real sadness for a family whose money can buy influence and power, but comes with costly personal consequences. (July)
From the Publisher
"Oppenheimer follows the clan of dysfunctional Band-Aid and baby-powder millionaires through the adulterous affairs, ugly divorces, drug and alcohol addictions, tragic accidents, suicide attempts, paternity disputes, will contests, and other turmoil as the family reaps the rewards of inheritance through privilege, opulence, and excess, for better and for worse." —-Booklist Starred Review
Library Journal
Oppenheimer, who's offered unauthorized peeks at Hillary and Bill Clinton, Anna Wintour, Martha Stewart, Barbara Walters, Jerry Seinfeld, and the Hilton family and landed on the best sellers lists for his troubles, here looks at the heirs of the Johnson megamillions and comes up with enough sex, suicide, and scandal to keep the right readers engrossed until all hours of the night.
Kirkus Reviews
A prolific biographer of the rich and infamous, Oppenheimer (Madoff with the Money, 2009, etc.) digs into five generations of the Johnson family, "the most dysfunctional family in the Fortune 500." Founded in 1887 by three Johnson brothers, Johnson & Johnson became synonymous with products such as Band-Aids and baby powder. The author occasionally reveals corporate strategies and secrets but mostly focuses on the members of the extended Johnson family, detailing their mind-boggling personal wealth. Hundreds of names come and go throughout the narrative, with Oppenheimer concentrating on 15 blood relatives, their spouses and business partners. The book is largely a fast-paced chronicle of births, courtings, marriages, divorces, estrangements, bitter lawsuits, drug and alcohol abuses, crimes, memorable deaths and other unpleasantness. After the first generation, members of the Johnson family found it difficult to decipher whether outsiders cared about them for their personalities or only for their wealth. That kind of doubt can cause havoc with emotional stability, as Oppenheimer demonstrates with frequent salacious details of the lives of his protagonists. As is the case with his other unauthorized biographies, the author usually reveals little about whether his information derives from primary or secondary sources. The writing is clear but often painful to read due to the use of clichés and trite metaphors. One Johnson family member emerges as the chief subject: Robert Wood Johnson IV, a great-grandson of a company founder. Oppenheimer uses the nickname "Woody" to identify the protagonist, frequently coming back to his fundraising for Republican presidential candidates and his ownership of the New York Jets. A gossipy, character-driven saga suggesting that the spoiled rich are their own worst enemies.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781250049087
  • Publisher: St. Martin's Press
  • Publication date: 8/12/2014
  • Pages: 512
  • Sales rank: 118,158
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.10 (h) x 1.40 (d)

Meet the Author

JERRY OPPENHEIMER is the bestselling author of unauthorized biographies of public figures including Hillary and Bill Clinton, Anna Wintour, Rock Hudson, Martha Stewart, Barbara Walters, Ethel Kennedy, Jerry Seinfeld, and the Hilton family. In addition to being a biographer he has also worked in several different capacities as a journalist, including as an investigative reporter and a producer of television news programs and documentaries.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 22 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(9)

4 Star

(3)

3 Star

(3)

2 Star

(3)

1 Star

(4)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 22 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 15, 2013

    I Also Recommend:

    Jerry Oppenheimer has done his research well. Crazy Rich is a vi

    Jerry Oppenheimer has done his research well. Crazy Rich is a vivid portrait of the successes and scandals of the Johnson & Johnson family. It was very well done and an excellent read.

    12 out of 12 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted August 17, 2013

    I Also Recommend:

    This is, without a doubt, an incredible story. I never knew ther

    This is, without a doubt, an incredible story. I never knew there was so much turmoil and scandal in behind the scenes of the famous Johnson family. The book is riveting.

    10 out of 12 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted August 31, 2013

    Where do I even start with this review? My overall impression ca

    Where do I even start with this review? My overall impression can be summarized in one word: un-befreaking-lievable! Seriously. Crazy Rich is most certainly a fitting title for this biography in more than one way. The lives these people have been living since the start of this dynasty are mind-boggling at the very least. At a whopping almost-five-hundred pages, Crazy Rich is a magnificently in-depth, tell-all read. And still I feel all that is only the tip of the iceberg and merely a glance at the lives of the Johnson heirs. While reading, I time and again asked myself: whose reality is this? It’s like reading a fairy tale gone wrong. You have the riches, the power, the influence and all the glory which makes it a fairytale read, but then you also have the scandals, drugs, narcissism and people who are definitely not in touch with what I perceive as reality. Yet, I very much enjoyed this read. I, like almost everyone else, know the Johnson & Johnson products, but I’ve never heard of any of these people before. Oppenheimer did a stellar job with this book and clearly put a lot of effort into compiling a book which, in my humble opinion, gives an unbiased view of this dynasty. If you go into it looking for scandals, drama or anything painting them in a negative light, you will surely find it. If, like me, you don’t care either way what these people did or do with their lives and their millions, and only read it because you’re curious about how this world famous product line started, you’ll find that and so much more. What I love about Crazy Rich is that everyone will have a different opinion about this book once they’ve finished it, and it makes for a coffee table must-have that would be a central point in starting topics of discussion which could ultimately lead to various debates and opinions. Highly recommended!

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 24, 2013

    dishing the dirt

    Although much of the events and people in this book was riveting, it was disturbing how some of the Johnsons were trashed. The author gave a more favorable assessment of those who cooperated with him . I found this disturbing and unethical.

    3 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 24, 2013

    Disapointing

    This was nothing more than a series of news events with little context or theme. Though the author seem to have spent significant time researching, building a common theme or supporting the title was lost in the redundant listing, but not writing of historical events in a disfuntional family, something that could likely be found in many multi generation families.

    3 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 25, 2014

    Anonymous

    I thought the subject matter was very interesting and was excited to read this book. Unfortunately, by page 22 it was obvious that Oppenheimer has an ax to grind with republicans, rich people, Woody Johnson, University of Arizona, Mitt Romney etc. WONDER WHO HE VOTED FOR? As another review put it, supermarket tabloid journalism. The fact that I made it through this one sided crap obviously says that I am a glutton for punishment.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 26, 2013

    The story is interesting but it is hard to get past the fact che

    The story is interesting but it is hard to get past the fact checking errors. In the first few chapters the author incorrectly states Michael Kennedy dying in 1987 vs 1997. This oversight made the author loose credibility in my mind. Later, he states something as happening four decades ago but the time difference is 1976 vs 2000.  

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 25, 2014

    This tale of the entitled rich was hard to put down - partly bec

    This tale of the entitled rich was hard to put down - partly because there were so many subjects, characters, generations, etc. that i had to go back and reread everytime I picked it up again.  It was extremely difficult to follow - going from past to present; back to past with so many names, and events to keep straight.  I enjoyed it very much though and would highly recommend reading it - IF you are one who likes biographical reading.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 28, 2013

    good book

    Makes you realize being rich can have as many drawbacks as being poor. Oppenheimer repeats a lot of information to keep you up with who is who.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted November 26, 2014

    more from this reviewer

    DYSFUNCTIAL FAMILY

    Amazing yet true story of the J&J generations and wasted lives and money.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 16, 2014

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 13, 2014

    Nexy res

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 11, 2013

    Facinating family story

    The story of the family and the detailed descriptions makes this book worth reading. Facinating to understand and see what people do that gets enough money to never have to work in their whole life if they don't wan to. Sometimes it works out fairly well and you own New York Jets and sometimes it does not work so well.
    The book was a little slow and sloppy written in some sections but the content still makes it well worth the time to read it.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 24, 2013

    NOT well written and a lot of embellished gossip. This unauthori

    NOT well written and a lot of embellished gossip. This unauthorized biography started out interesting and turned into
    nothing but a
    tabloid.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 20, 2013

    Gossip, gossip, and more gossip!!!

    This book was like reading one of the magazines near the grocery check out. The author found a lot of interesting bits about this very rich family. The author also tries to undermine their politics by linking the family's flaws with political donations. I enjoyed reading the gossip but the author's own agenda was "way" too obvious. You'll enjoy the gossip and get a good laugh at the author's one track bias because it is so funny that he can only see or write from his own prejudices. A really great book about a weathy family is "The Partisan" by William Jarvis. This novel is based on true events and is excellent. That book deserves "ten" stars.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 23, 2013

    From a business perspective the Johnson company has a place in h

    From a business perspective the Johnson company has a place in history. Known at the beginning for certain dubious tactics, which led to the initial rise of the brand name. Their influence on products and the marketing of these products is worth knowing from an historical point of view. The importance of their various products and the way they shaped their brand, the packaging and marketing in their early business era is quite memorable. Even now most households will have items made by the Johnson company in their possession.
    Secondary to the business structure is the family,which was the emphasis of this book. A large complicated web of family connections, scandals and secrets hidden away from the public eye.
    Most families will have their share of scandals and secrets, with the rich and famous they tend to get more press coverage and often the scandals are excessive due to their wealth.The rich are better at keeping certain things out of the public eye and I can imagine the Johnson emporium was not happy about the revelations in regards to child abuse and molestation.
    At times I felt the information was superfluous to the Johnson family history. There was no need to mention Oprah Winfrey's weight battles, Schwarzenegger's affair with the maid or even Catherine Zeta Jones and her bi-polar issues. All that just seemed like excessive gossip.
    The Johnson family doesn't need the scandals of others to be infamous they do quite well on their own.
    The story was more a compilation of facts, names, places and who married which person when and how often. It was less story and a lot of data. With the amount of data at hand it might have been better to concentrate on one branch of the family. Instead a lot of the facts are out of sequence and confusing at times due to sheer number of things packed into it.
    I received a copy of this book via NetGalley.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 20, 2013

    Two stars

    Not very well written. The family is too large and too confusing to follow with all the divorces. He skipped around too much.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 27, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted September 28, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 16, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 22 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)