Create Your Own Economy: The Path to Prosperity in a Disordered World

Create Your Own Economy: The Path to Prosperity in a Disordered World

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by Tyler Cowen
     
 

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How will we live well in a super-networked, information-soaked, yet predictably irrational world? The only way to know is to understand how the way we think is changing.

As economist Tyler Cowen boldly shows in Create Your Own Economy, the way we think now is changing more rapidly than it has in a very long time. Not since the Industrial Revolution has a

Overview

How will we live well in a super-networked, information-soaked, yet predictably irrational world? The only way to know is to understand how the way we think is changing.

As economist Tyler Cowen boldly shows in Create Your Own Economy, the way we think now is changing more rapidly than it has in a very long time. Not since the Industrial Revolution has a man-made creation—in this case, the World Wide Web—so greatly influenced the way our minds work and our human potential. Cowen argues brilliantly that we are breaking down cultural information into ever-smaller tidbits, ordering and reordering them in our minds (and our computers) to meet our own specific needs.

Create Your Own Economy explains why the coming world of Web 3.0 is good for us; why social networking sites such as Facebook are so necessary; what's so great about "Tweeting" and texting; how education will get better; and why politics, literature, and philosophy will become richer. This is a revolutionary guide to life in the new world.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

In this provocative study of behavioral economics, Cowen (Discover Your Inner Economist) reveals that autistic tendencies toward classification, categorization and specialization can be used as a vehicle for understanding how people use information. Cowen spends a great deal of time dispelling autism's societal stigma, arguing that "mainstream society is reaping benefits from mimicking autistic cognitive strengths." As stimulating as is the premise, the book often feels like its own long exercise in categorization, with each chapter an analysis of the human mania for classification (e.g., the obsession with ranking achievements and endeavors). According to Cowen, human brains are constantly absorbing bits of information that get smaller and are delivered faster as technology advances. The more information people receive, the more they crave-this shorter attention span is far from a flaw to the author, but a liberating mechanism that allows humans time to contemplate more ambitious, long-range pursuits. The relentless analysis is occasionally overwhelming, but Cowen's illustration of our neurological filing system may help readers understand the mass consumption of information and just about everything else. (July)Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From the Publisher
"Patrick Lawlor tackles this study in behavioral economics with ease." —AudioFile

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780525951230
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
07/09/2009
Pages:
272
Product dimensions:
6.30(w) x 9.10(h) x 1.20(d)
Age Range:
18 - 17 Years

What People are saying about this

Daniel H. Pink
"Only a mind like Tyler Cowen's could weave Facebook, Zen Buddhism, Sherlock Holmes, and so much more into a coherent and compelling argument. Create Your Own Economy will change the way you think about thinking."--(Daniel H. Pink, author of A Whole New Mind)
Samuel R. Sommers
"The modern world bombards us with data just begging to be organized, from iPod playlists to digital vacation photos. Tyler Cowen offers an entertaining tour of our information age, pondering implications for how creative we are, how long our attention span is, how our politics work, and the future of our economy."--(Samuel R. Sommers, Assistant Professor of Psychology, Tufts University)
From the Publisher
"Patrick Lawlor tackles this study in behavioral economics with ease." —-AudioFile
Robert H. Frank
"If you're curious about where society and the economy are headed, you'll search in vain for anyone with more interesting insights than Tyler Cowen. He's a genuine visionary and Create Your Own Economy is a tour de force."--(Robert H. Frank, author of The Economic Naturalist and Professor of Economics at Cornell University)
Temple Grandin
"Create Your Own Economy will open your mind to thinking differently. The unique thought processes of individuals on the autism spectrum provide a great value to our world. This book will help you to be smart and successful in your own way."--(Temple Grandin, author of Thinking in Pictures)

Meet the Author

Tyler Cowen is a professor of economics at George Mason University. He is a prominent blogger at marginalrevolution.com, the world’s leading economics blog. He also writes regularly for The New York Times, and has written for Forbes, The Wall Street Journal, Newsweek, The Washington Post, The Los Angeles Times, and The Wilson Quarterly.

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Create Your Own Economy: The Path to Prosperity in a Disordered World 3.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
EPBigham More than 1 year ago
Great book recommended by Dan Sullivan of Strategic Coach as one of his best reads. Agree, very insightful about today's life and how we order and resource information to adjust and direct our lives. Book is hard to find, but the CD set is great, and Patrick Lawlor is one of the best "voices" in all bookdom. -- Paul
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The title of this book is very dishonest. This book is about autism, and the title should have reflected that. There is no information in the book that warrants its' title. Why both the author and publisher felt the need to engage in such deception I do not know. If you are interested in autism you may enjoy this book, otherwise don't waste your money.
Datwyler More than 1 year ago
This book was presented in a magazine as something a bit different than what it is. The book is about autism and how those who have autism think. It is not really about economics, though an economist wrote it. After I read it, it did make me think about how a person thinks. It may be different for you.