Creating a Confederate Kentucky: The Lost Cause and Civil War Memory in a Border State

Overview

Marshall traces the development of a Confederate identity in Kentucky between 1865 and 1925 that belied the fact that Kentucky never left the Union and that more Kentuckians fought for the North than for the South. Following the Civil War, the people of Kentucky appeared to forget their Union loyalties, embracing the Democratic politics, racial violence, and Jim Crow laws associated with formerly Confederate states.

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Creating a Confederate Kentucky: The Lost Cause and Civil War Memory in a Border State

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Overview

Marshall traces the development of a Confederate identity in Kentucky between 1865 and 1925 that belied the fact that Kentucky never left the Union and that more Kentuckians fought for the North than for the South. Following the Civil War, the people of Kentucky appeared to forget their Union loyalties, embracing the Democratic politics, racial violence, and Jim Crow laws associated with formerly Confederate states.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Marshall has illuminated an important and understudied aspect of how a border region simultaneously departed from and reflected broader patterns of memory. Marshall's excellent study will refine our understanding of how contested and unpredictable memory was and continues to be."—The American Historical Review

"Anne Marshall's Creating a Confederate Kentucky alters the entire field of Civil War memory study….[It] is a masterful work of scholarship. Its prose is lucid; its research is thorough; and its interpretative power is truly ground-breaking."—Civil War Book Review

"Marshall has crafted an easily read, easily comprehensible scholarly volume. Recommended. All levels/libraries."—Choice

"By enriching our understanding of the ways Confederate Kentuckians, white Unionists, and African Americans interpreted the state's participation in the Civil War, Marshall also sheds significant light on the processes through which competing interests claim ownership of history."—The Journal of American History

"An excellent book: tightly argued, richly detailed, and elegantly written. It is a model of what a state study can do, showing the importance of not just race, but also place, to the story of the Lost Cause."—Civil War Monitor

"Creating a Confederate Kentucky is a welcome addition to the study of post-Civil War Kentucky. . . . Those who teach the history of Kentucky and of the Civil War and Reconstruction will find this book a valuable addition to their reading lists."—Journal of the Civil War Era

"Marshall's book is beautifully written and truly a pleasure to read."—Journal of Southern History

"Marshall's book is a good read, and it will be of much interest to those seeking a better understanding not only of Kentucky's key role in the 1860s, but also of how all of us have remembered the war ever since."—Blue & Gray Magazine

"Ideal for a range of scholars . . . . A pleasure to read."— Journal of Historical Geography

"A must read for all Civil War historians."—Journal of NC Association of Historians
"An interesting, informative book. It helps clarify the experiences of many of us who grew up in Kentucky. . . . The book has set a new standard."—The Kentucky Civil War Bugle

"Examines all sides of Kentucky's Union-Confederate postwar dialogue. . . . [A] thoughtful, carefully researched and plausibly presented historical study, illustrated with a handful of vintage black-and-white photographs. Highly recommended."—Midwest Book Review

"An intelligent narrative. . . . The author writes well and is easy to read. . . . A valuable and serious history of the development of Confederate memory in Kentucky and in America. . . . An excellent book for any student of Reconstruction, the process of reconciliation or the years after the Civil War."—TOCWOC: A Civil War Blog

"Rather than focusing exclusively on postwar political and economic factors, Creating a Confederate Kentucky looks over the longer term at Kentuckians' activities . . . by which they commemorated the Civil War and fixed the state's remembrance of it for sixty years following the conflict. . . . Will be a nice addition to your Confederate/Kentucky library shelf. . . . Excellent."—Lone Star Book Review

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781469609836
  • Publisher: The University of North Carolina Press
  • Publication date: 8/1/2013
  • Series: Civil War America Series
  • Edition description: 1
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 256
  • Product dimensions: 6.10 (w) x 9.20 (h) x 0.80 (d)

Meet the Author

Anne E. Marshall is assistant professor of history at Mississippi State University.

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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Posted November 30, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Becoming Confederate

    E. Merton Coulter said Kentucky "waited until after the war was over to secede from the Union." In Causes Won, Lost, and Forgotten: How Hollywood and Popular Art Shape What We Know about the Civil War Garry W. Gallagher looks at secession 150 years after the war. This book documents the process and reasons for Kentucky becoming a Confederate state in popular memory. In the process, the reader gains an understanding of how the South lost the war but won the peace.
    Kentucky is a badly divided Border State in 1861. With strong ties to both sides, politically the state makes no choice. Kentuckians follow their heart in choosing sides, even as events force Kentucky into the Union ranks. This is never a comfortable fit for the state or the Union. The Emancipation Proclamation is not applicable in Kentucky. After the war, slavery is still legal and people are slaves. Reconstruction is not necessary in a state that never seceded. An army of occupation does not protect people working for the Freeman's Bureau. Black men, who enlisted in the USCT and their families, are free but the law offers little protection. Many Whites that supported the Union did not do so to destroy slavery and feel betrayed. Many ex-Confederates are welcomed home and have their civil rights restored as if nothing happened. With so many tensions, Kentucky is a powder keg.
    The author documents the explosion in Kentucky and the resulting development of a Confederate memory. In the process, we see post war America and the development of reconciliation. This is not an easy process filled with high-minded people acting with the best of motivates. This is a bloody, violent era where factions struggle for advantage and in some cases survival. Age, selective memory, practical considerations and race play major roles during this time. All of these threads and many more are woven into an intelligent narrative that takes the reader from the end of the war to the 20th Century. The author writes well and is easy to read. This well illustrated book has a complete set of endnotes, Bibliography and index. It is a valuable and serious history of the development of Confederate memory in Kentucky and in America. This is an excellent book for any student of Reconstruction, the process of reconciliation or the years after the Civil War.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 27, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

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