Creating a Failed State: The U.S. and Canada in Afghanistan

Overview


Taking the stance that the mainstream media sugarcoats Canada's involvement in the U.S.'s war in Afghanistan—and equates "supporting the troops" with supporting the war—this analysis looks at Canada's role in light of the politics of oil and U.S. imperialism, making heated calls for Canada's withdrawal. It is argued that the intent of capturing Osama bin Laden was merely a guise for the U.S.'s desire to dominate internationally, and that Canada's historical role of essentially following U.S. foreign ...
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Overview


Taking the stance that the mainstream media sugarcoats Canada's involvement in the U.S.'s war in Afghanistan—and equates "supporting the troops" with supporting the war—this analysis looks at Canada's role in light of the politics of oil and U.S. imperialism, making heated calls for Canada's withdrawal. It is argued that the intent of capturing Osama bin Laden was merely a guise for the U.S.'s desire to dominate internationally, and that Canada's historical role of essentially following U.S. foreign policy makes it impossible to justify their continued presence and should be questioned more fervently as an imperialist quest for oil and gas resources.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781552662625
  • Publisher: Fernwood Publishing
  • Publication date: 9/1/2008
  • Pages: 192
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 8.90 (h) x 0.50 (d)

Meet the Author


John W. Warnock is a former professor of political economy and sociology at the University of Regina and is the author of The Other Mexico, The Politics of Hunger: The Global Food System, and Saskatchewan: The Roots of Discontent and Protest. He lives in Regina, Saskatchewan.
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Table of Contents


Acknowledgements     1
Introduction     2
Humanitarian Intervention: Guns v. Spears     6
US Power is Air Power     8
Depleted Uranium: The Gift from Saskatchewan     10
Our Allies: The Northern Alliance     11
Air Power in Support of the Northern Alliance     12
Strictly an American War     13
Collateral Damage     15
What Was the Alternative?     17
The Victory for Air Power     19
Afghanistan as a Failed State?     21
What Is a Failed State?     22
Afghanistan's Political Economy     24
Socio-economic Profile     25
Afghanistan Six Years after the US Invasion     26
Planning Economic Development: Afghanistan as a New Colony     33
Failed States and "Humanitarian Intervention"     35
Canada and Humanitarian Intervention     38
Modernization and Modernity     40
The Afghan Empire and the Great Game     42
Modernization: The Influence of Ataturk     45
Afghanistan's Social Structure     46
Moving Towards Liberal Democracy     48
Constructing a New Constitution     49
The Rise ofthe People's Democratic Party of Afghanistan     50
The Communists Seize Power     52
The Soviet Union Moves into Afghanistan     54
The Rise of the Islamist Opposition     56
The Outcome of the War against Communism     58
The Rabbani Government and Civil War     59
The Rise of the Taliban     60
The United States and the Burden of Empire     62
The Importance of Oil and Gas     64
The Policy Shift in the US Government     67
Full-spectrum Dominance     70
Finding the New Gurkhas     72
National Security Intelligence     75
The New National Security State     76
Controlling Public Opinion     79
The Struggle for Caspian Sea Oil     81
Resistance to the New World Order     84
The New Great Game in Central Asia     86
9/11, al Oaeda and the War on Terrorism     88
Creating the Islamist Rebellion     91
Supporting the Mujahideen Islamists in Afghanistan     92
Osama Bin Laden and the War of Insurgency     93
Al Qaeda Moves to the United States     94
The Blowback Begins     95
Planning the Second Attack on the World Trade Center      98
Numerous Advance Warnings of 9/11 Attack     100
US-al Qaeda Relations After the End of the Afghan War     102
Cracks in the al Qaeda-CIA Alliance     103
Why is Bin Laden Still at Large?     104
Al Qaeda and the War on Terrorism     105
B-52 Democracy     110
The Bonn Agreement     112
The Emergency Loya Jirga     114
Forming the New Constitution     116
The New Constitution     118
The Presidential Election     120
The Election for the Parliament     123
A Democratic Government?     126
Canada's Role in Afghanistan Democracy     127
The Politics of Women's Rights     130
US Government Supports the Taliban     132
Women under the Rabbani and Taliban Regimes     133
The Afghan Patriarchal Tradition     135
The Historical Roots of Patriarchal Culture     138
Patriarchal Practices in Western Cultures     140
The Impact of Islam     141
Women's Rights after 2001     144
Breaking the Move towards Modernity     147
Canada's Role in Afghanistan     150
The Response to 9/11     150
The Canadian Government and the Afghan War     152
Canada and the US War on Iraq     155
The Political Response to 9/11     156
Post Cold War Foreign Policy Direction     158
The Three D Approach to Canadian Policy     159
The End of Peacekeeping?     160
Three-D Policy: Canada's Political Role in Afghanistan     162
Three-D Policy: Canada's Military Role in Afghanistan     165
Three-D Policy: Canada's Economic and Humanitarian Assistance     168
The Complete Loss of National Sovereignty     170
Where Do We Go from Here?     171
What Are the Alternatives?     173
The Alternative Policy for Canada     175
Shifting to Humanitarian Assistance     178
A New Dimension for Canadian Policy     180
Building Peace and Independence in Canada     183
What is Terrorism?     187
Selected Bibliography and Notes     190
Index     204
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