Creating Breakthrough Products: Innovation from Product Planning to Program Approval

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Overview

Creating Breakthrough Products identifies key factors associated with successful innovation, and presents an insightful and comprehensive approach to building products and services that redefine markets -- or create new ones. Learn to identify Product Opportunity Gaps that can lead to enormous success; control and navigate the "Fuzzy Front End" of the product development process; and leverage contributions from diverse product teams -- while staying relentlessly focused on your customer's values and lifestyles.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780132618625
  • Publisher: FT Press
  • Publication date: 11/14/2010
  • Pages: 336
  • Sales rank: 1,146,169
  • Product dimensions: 6.90 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 0.70 (d)

Meet the Author

JONATHAN CAGAN is a Professor of Mechanical Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University. His work focuses on the early stages of product development with emphasis on engineering design, interdisciplinary collaborations, formal design synthesis, and computational design tools. Dr. Cagan is a Fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers and a registered Professional Engineer.

CRAIG M. VOGEL is a Professor in the School of Design at Carnegie Mellon University. His areas of expertise include product design, product aesthetics, design history, team management, and design patent litigation. Professor Vogel is a Fellow, and former President, of the Industrial Designers Society of America (IDSA).

Professors Cagan and Vogel have collaborated for close to a decade in teaching, research, and consulting in the area of integrated new product development. For more information see www.creatingbreakthroughproducts.com

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Table of Contents

1. What Drives New Product Development.

Redefining the Bottom Line. Identifying Product Opportunities: The SET Factors. POG and SET Factor Case Studies.

2. Moving to the Upper Right.

Integrating Style and Technology. Style vs. Technology: A Brief History of the Evolution of Style and Technology in the 19th and 20th Centuries. Middle Class and the Height of Mass Marketing. Positioning Map: Style vs. Technology. Positioning Map of Starbucks. Knockoffs and Rip-offs. Revolutionary vs. Evolutionary Product Development.

3. The Upper Right: The Value Quadrant.

The Sheer Cliff of Value-The Third Dimension. Value Opportunities Value Opportunity Charts and Analysis. The Time and Place for Value Opportunities. The Upper Right for Industrial Products.

4. The Core of a Successful Brand Strategy: Breakthrough Products and Services.

Brand Strategy and Product Strategy. Corporate Commitment to Product and Brand. Corporate Values and Customer Values. Managing Product Brand. Starting from Scratch: Iomega. Maintaining an Established Identity: Harley. Brand and the Value Opportunities.

5. A Comprehensive Approach to User-Centered, Integrated New Product Development.

Clarifying the Fuzzy Front End of New Product Development. User-Centered iNPD Process. Resource Allocation.

6. Integrating Disciplines and Managing Diverse Teams.

User-Centered iNPD Facilitates Customer Value. Understanding Perceptual Gaps. Team Functionality. Part Differentiation Matrix. Issues in Team Management: Team Empowerment. iNPD Team Integration Effectiveness.

7. Understanding the User's Needs, Wants, and Desires.

Overview: Usability and Desirability. An Integrated Approach to a User-Driven Process. Scenario Development (Part I). New Product Ethnography. Lifestyle Reference. Ergonomics: Interaction, Task Analysis, and Anthropometrics. Scenario Development (Part II). Broadening the Focus. Product Definition. Visualizing Ideas and Concepts Early and Often. Research Acknowledgements.

8. Case Studies: The Power of the Upper Right.

Overview of Case Studies.

9. Automotive Design: Product Differentiation through User-Centered iNPD.

The Dynamic SET Factors of the Auto Industry. The Design Process and Complexities. Breaking Down the Process. Positioning: Product Differentiation. The Retro Craze. A Case Study of iNPD at Carnegie Mellon University. Implications of User-Centered iNPD on the Auto Industry.

Research Acknowledgments.

Epilogue.

Future Trends.

Have Faith in the Leap.

References.

Index.

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