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Creating Graphics for Learning and Performance: Lessons in Visual Literacy / Edition 2

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Overview

Creating Graphics for Learning and Performance: Lessons in Visual Literacy will help you create effective visuals–visuals that are clear, communicate well, and help you learn and perform your job more effectively and efficiently. This book clearly and quickly explains such fundamental issues as:

· The effective number of fonts to use in a visual

· Why using all capital letters is not desirable

· Why you should go easy on the “bells and whistles”

· How to use different shapes to unify, separate or chunk information

· How to use color effectively

· How to make effective charts and graphs

· And much more

With this book you will learn about the three most intuitive design principles that you can begin applying to your work immediately: selection, organization and integration. These principles are learned gradually as you explore the tools of type, shape, color, depth and space. In addition, a resource chapter provides you with a quick guide to the tools of graphic design including hardware, software, books and web resources

Whether you are a teacher, business professional, graphic designer, artist, instructional designer, or software developer this book of essential design foundations is the one for you.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780132191586
  • Publisher: Pearson
  • Publication date: 7/31/2007
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 2
  • Pages: 336
  • Product dimensions: 8.21 (w) x 10.80 (h) x 0.70 (d)

Table of Contents

Part 1: Foundations

Chapter 1) Visual Literacy

Chapter 2) Getting Started

Chapter 3) Visuals and Learning

Chapter 4) Process: ACE it with PAT

Part 2: Principles

Chapter 5) Selection

Chapter 6) Organization

Chapter 7) Integration

Part 3: Actions and Tools

Chapter 8) CARP

Chapter 9) Type

Chapter 10) Shape

Chapter 11) Color, Depth, and Space

Resources

Chapter 12) Resources

Part I.

Foundations

Chapter 1: Visual Literacy for Educators and Performance Specialists

1) Notes about the opening visual

2) Focus Questions

3) Key terms

4) Introduction

a) The Need for Visual Literacy

b) The Context: Education and Performance

5) EXAMPLES OF EDUCATION/PERFORMANCE NEEDS

a) Three Education/Performance Stories

b) What is Wrong, Design-Wise, With These Stories?

c) Universal design issues

6) VISUAL LITERACY DEFINED

a) What Exactly is a Visual?

b) What Is Literacy?

(1) Information literacy

(2) Workforce literacy

(3) Visual literacy

c) Visual Literacy for Instruction and Performance Support

(1) Antonio, the sixth grade teacher

(2) Sylvia, the instruction designer/trainer

(3) Zack, the computer programmer/graphic artist

(4) Latisha, the community college instructor and part-time technical writing contractor

7) Some Example of Instructional/Performance Images

a) Decorative Visuals

b) Representative Visuals

c) Organizational Visuals

d) Interpretive Visuals

e) Transformative Visuals

8) Book Organization

a) Section I. Foundations

b) Section II. Principles

c) Section III. Actions and Tools: Shaping Instruction to Facilitate Learning

d) Resources

9) Strategies For Using The Book

a) The Sequential Strategy

b) The Theory/Application Pair Strategy

c) The ‘Tools Before Principles “Just Do It” Strategy

10) Summary

11) Practice

a) Resource Activities

b) Website Activities

c) Discussion Questions

d) K-12 Student Activities

12) References

Chapter 2: Getting Started

1) Notes about the opening visual

2) Focus Questions

3) Key terms

4) Introduction: Learning to Compose with Visuals

5) The Importance of Visual Communication Skills

6) With All the Technology, Why the Challenge?

a) Technocentric thinking

b) The blind belief that a picture is always worth 1,000 words.

c) A plethora of design guidelines, many that overlap and contradict

7) How the Book Helps

8) Learn by Doing

a) Get past eye candy

b) Three approaches to creating good design

9) Do You Need Computer Skills?

10) Just Do It

a) (1) don’t be too hard on yourself when you make mistakes

b) (2) play a little

c) (3) get inspired, and

d) (4) revise a lot (get used to doing things over and over).

11) Summary

12) Practice

a) Resource Activities

b) Website Activities

c) Discussion Question

d) K-12 Student Activities

13)Reference

Chapter 3: Visuals and Learning

1) Notes about the opening visual

2) Focus Questions

3) Key terms

4) Introduction

a) Sylvia and the Storyboard

b) Research support for Visuals in Education

c) Some Points to Consider While Reading

5) Theory

a) Cognitive Load Theory: Our Macro Design Theory

(1) Intrinsic Load

(2) Extraneous Load

(3) Germane Load

(1) Simple to complex sequencing

(2) Familiar t unfamiliar sequencing

(a) Metaphors and analogies

(b) Stories.

(1) Simple to complex sequencing challenges

(2) Familiar to unfamiliar sequencing challenges

b) Information Processing Theory

(1) Sensory Memory

(2) Working Memory

(1) Schema

(1) Providing Cues for Each Type of Memory

(a) The Directory Structure Example

(b) The 120719411945 Example

(c) Other types of content

d) Pavio's Dual Coding Theory

e) Baddeley's Episodic Buffer Theory

f) Mayer's Theory

6) Putting it All Together

a) Three Important Principles

7) Summary

8) Practice

a) Resource Activities

b) Website Activities

c) Discussion Question

d) K-12 Student Activities

9) References

Chapter 4: ACE It With Principles, Actions, and Tools

1) Notes about the opening visual

2) Focus Questions

3) Key terms

4) Introduction

5) Getting Started with ACE

a) Analyze

b) Create

(1) Ideas for generating a visual concept

(2) Synectics

(1) Principles

(2) Actions

(3) Tools

c) Evaluate

d) Putting it all together

6) The Context: Instructional Design Models

a) ADDIE

b) ACE

7) Summary

8) Practice

a) Resource Activities

b) Website Activities

c) Discussion Question

d) K-12 Student Activities

9) References

Part II

Principles

Chapter 5: Selection Principle: Emphasizing Figure/Ground

1) Notes about the opening visual

2) Focus Questions

3) Key terms

4) Introduction

5) Selection and Figure/Ground

a) Three types of Figure/Ground Problems

b) Working with Figure/Ground

6) Summary

7) Practice

a) Resource Activities

b) Website Activities

c) Discussion Question

d) K-12 Student Activities

8) References

Chapter 6: Organization

1) Notes about the opening visual

2) Focus Questions

3) Key terms

4) Introduction

5) What does the research say about hierarchy?

6) How should you chunk information?

a) Where do you want the learner to look first?

b) How do you draw the eye to different parts of the visual?

7) How do you use hierarcy to design tables and charts?

a) Tables

b) Charts

8) Hierarchy in books, Electronic Presentations, and CBT/WBT

a) Technques to show hierarchy

9) How does hierarchy facilitate different picture functions?

a) Decoration

b) Representation

c) Organization

d) Explanation

10) How is hierarchy used to facilitate generative strategies?

a) Form mental imges

b) Create an outline

c) Create a flowchart

d) Create an image or a model

11) Summary

12) Practice

a) Resource Activities

b) Website Activities

c) Discussion Question

d) K-12 Student Activities

13) References

Chapter 7: Integration principles

1) Notes about the opening visual

2) Focus Questions

3) Key terms

4) Introduction

5) Five Gestalt Principles

a) Closure

b) Contiguity

c) Similarity

d) Proximity

e) Experience

(1) Four instructional interface metaphors

(a)Outline

(b) Table of contents

(c) Desktop

(d) Syllabus

(2) Design based on student and teacher tasks

(3) An open ended learning interface

(4) General interface design guidelines

f) Using tools and actions to increase gestalt

(a) White space

(b)Balance

1. Three strategies

2. Identify symmetrical or asymetrical design

3. Consider the rule of thirds

4. Cosider the golden rectangle

g) How do you design generative strategies with Gestalt in mind?

6) Summary

7) Practice

a) Resource Activities

b) Website Activities

c) Discussion Question

d) K-12 Student Activities

8) References

Part III

Actions and Tools

Chapter 8: Contrast, Alignment, Repetition, and Proximity, CARP

1) Notes about the opening visual

2) Focus Questions

3) Key terms

4) Introduction

5) The research on CARP

6) A Review of each action

a) Contrast

b) Alignment

c) Repetition

d) Proximity

7) Practice

a) Resource Activities

b) Website Activities

c) Discussion Question

d) K-12 Student Activities

8) References

Chapter 9: Type

1) Notes about the opening visual

2) Focus Questions

3) Key terms

4) Introduction

5) Why is type powerful?

6) What are the types of type?

7) Which type is best for instruction?

a) Classic typefaces

b) Unique typefaces

c) Serif versus sans serif

d) Legibility and readability

e) Take a type test

8) Can you talk type?

9) Which type is important for instruction?

a) X-height

b) Serif or sans serif?

c) Counters

d) Kerning

10) How does type affect layouts?

a) Text alignment

b) Line length

c) Type size

d) Cueing devices

11)Summary

12)Practice

a) Resource Activities

b) Website Activities

c) Discussion Question

d) K-12 Student Activities

13)References

Chapter 10: Shape

1) Notes about the opening visual

2) Focus Questions

3) Key terms

4) Introduction

5) The instructional function of shape

a) Simple shapes

b) Common and complex shapes

6) Identifying the display shape

a) Shapes to fit the display

b) Cartoon shapes

7) Summary

8) Practice

a) Resource Activitie

b) Website Activities

c) Discussion Question

d) K-12 Student Activities

9) References

Chapter 11: Color, Depth, and Space

1) Notes about the opening visual

2) Focus Questions

3) Key terms

4) Introduction

5) Color Overview

a) What is color?

b) Characteristics of color for visual instruction

(1) Labeling

(2) Identifying quantity and measurement

(3) Representing reality

(4) Creating aesthetic appeal

c) Research on color and learning

d) Choosing color for instruction

(1) Choose color based on the color wheel

(2) Choose color based on inspiration from nature and art

(3) Choose color based on color palettes found in templates

(4) Choose color based on psychological associations

6) Depth

a) Scale

b) Dimension

c) Texture

7) Space

a) Space as a tool for clarifying text

b) Space and perception of time

c) Space and balance

8) Summary

9) Practice

a) Resource Activities

b) Website Activities

c) Discussion Question

d) K-12 Student Activities

10) References

Chapter 12: Resources

1) Notes about the opening visual

2) Key terms

3) Introduction

4) Part 1: the web site activities: Five frequently asked questions

a) Question 1. What software programs (PowerPoint, Illustrator, Word, Photoshop) should I use?

b) Question 2. Which computer design skills should I work on first?

c) Question 3. How do I turn in projects in a distributed learning environment (BlackBoard, eCollege, WebCT, and the like?

d) Question 4. How do I get help using software?

e) Question 5: What do I need to know about Copyright

5) Part 2: Resources for Development of Instructional Materials

6) Summary

7) References

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