Creating Inclusive Classrooms: Effective and Reflective Practices / Edition 4

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Overview

Features of the fourth edition include:

  • Content is based around four principles—diversity, individual needs, reflective practice, and collaboration—to demonstrate that inclusion is not just a government mandate, but a principled philosophy of reflective, effective teaching.
  • Emphasizes reflective practice through two new features: Reflective on Professional Practices and Reflecting on Your Practices.
  • Unique concluding chapter discusses and demonstrates how to assess the success of your inclusion program.
  • Each chapter includes textual content related to multiculturalism, and ends with What Would You Do in Today's Diverse Classroom? reflective exercises.
  • Includes a CD-ROM, "Developing Quality IEPs: A Case-Based Tutorial", which guides students through the development of IEPs and the criteria necessary to assess their quality.
  • a text-specific Companion Website and video package have been integrated into the book.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780130190734
  • Publisher: Pearson Education
  • Publication date: 7/31/2000
  • Edition description: Older Edition
  • Edition number: 4
  • Pages: 518
  • Product dimensions: 7.99 (w) x 10.00 (h) x 0.35 (d)

Read an Excerpt

PREFACE:

PREFACE

As reflections of society, our nation's schools have historically been challenged to respond to various societal changes and mandates. In 1954 the Supreme Court, in its decision in the case of Brown v. Board of Education, mandated that schools stop segregating students based on race. With passage of the Education for All Handicapped Children Act of 1975 (PL 94-142), now called the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), Congress required our nation's educational system to include students with disabilities. Within the last 20 years, demographic shifts, economic conditions, and changes in the structure of families have challenged schools to meet the needs of a diverse group of students.

The inclusion movement has developed to meet these educational mandates and challenges. However, there is still a considerable gap between theory and practice. This book is intended to fill that gap by keeping the perspectives of teachers, students, and families in mind, and translating current research on inclusion into effective and reflective classroom practices that address and expand the realities of the classroom setting. Within each chapter are numerous classroom-based examples and case studies of real situations that educators, students, and family members encounter in inclusive classrooms as well as guidelines, strategies, and procedures that have been used to address these situations to educate all students successfully in inclusive classrooms.

The book is designed to serve as a text for undergraduate, graduate, and in-service courses for teachers, ancillary support personnel, and administrators interestedin teaching and providing services to students with diverse learning needs. Because of its focus on instructional procedures and collaboration, the book also can serve as a supplementary text for a course on methods or consultation.

ORGANIZATION AND APPROACH

The book is organized into four parts. Part One includes Chapters 1, 2, and 3 and introduces you to the foundations and fundamentals of inclusion and the challenges of its implementation. Part Two includes Chapters 4, 5, 6, and 7 and provides you with strategies for creating an inclusive environment that supports learning for all students. Part Three includes Chapters 8, 9, 10, and 11 and offers you strategies to differentiate instruction to promote the learning of all students within inclusive educational settings. Part Four consists of Chapter 12 which offers a framework and specific strategies and resources for evaluating inclusion programs in terms of individual and programmatic progress.

A Principled Philosophy

The following principles of effective inclusion also provide a framework for this book. These four principles—diversity, individual needs, reflective practice, and collaboration—are integrated into each chapter of the book and demonstrate that inclusion is not just a government mandate but a principled philosophy of reflective, effective teaching.

  • Principle #l: Effective inclusion improves the educational system for all students by placing them together in general education classrooms—regardless of their learning ability, race, linguistic ability, economic status, gender, learning style, ethnicity, cultural background, religion, family structure, and sexual orientation. Inherent in the concept of inclusion is the recognition of the need to individualize the educational system for all students. The result can be an educational system that is more able to accommodate and respond to the individual needs of all students. Thus, changes in the educational system designed to facilitate effective inclusion also benefit all students, teachers, families, ancillary support personnel, and administrators.
  • Principle #2: Effective inclusion involves sensitivity to and acceptance of individual needs and differences. Educators cannot teach students without looking at the various factors that have shaped and will continue to shape their students and make them unique. Therefore, since race, linguistic ability, gender, economic status, and learning ability interact to create a complex amalgam that affects academic performance and socialization, educators, students, and family members must be sensitive to and accepting of individual needs and differences. Educators also must be willing to modify attitudes, instructional techniques, curriculum, and models of family involvement to address and accommodate these needs. Our ability to redefine the mainstream to include the unique needs and differences of students and their families, as well as incorporate their varied visions, voices, and contributions, is critical in expanding the educational, social, and cultural base of our educational system and promoting effective inclusion programs.
  • Principle # 3: Effective inclusion requires reflective educators to modify their attitudes, teaching and classroom management practices, and curricula to accommodate individual needs. Success at creating inclusive classrooms depends on the ability of educators to become effective and reflective practitioners who are able to think critically about their values, beliefs, and practices. They continually engage in self-improvement by reflecting upon and evaluating the impact of their actions on students, families, and other professionals and refining their teaching practices and curricula to facilitate the learning of all students. Therefore, in addition to providing you with effective practices and examples of their use in inclusive settings, the book contains several innovative pedagogical features designed to help you develop your skill as a reflective practitioner.
  • Principle # 4.: Effective inclusion is a group effort which involves collaboration among educators, other professionals, students, families, and community agencies. When these groups work together, the likelihood for effective inclusion is increased. Thus, the book outlines the roles and responsibilities of educators, families, students with disabilities and their peers, and community agencies to promote effective inclusion programs, and offers strategies for integrating these roles so that individuals work collaboratively and communicate regularly.

These four principles, along with the incorporation of instructional technology into each chapter, make the book consistent with professional standards for preparing teachers to work in today's diverse classrooms.

A Non-Categorical Approach

The book is also organized to the serve as a model for creating inclusive classrooms for all students. It is meant to facilitate your development of a holistic approach to educating students while focusing on individual needs rather than on global disability characteristics. Thus, it is not separated into chapters by disability category or cultural and linguistic background that imply and focus on the differences that have been used to segregate students from one another. Rather, the book approaches inclusion as an ongoing, dynamic process for all students. Chapter titles and content relate to and address the key factors that contribute to effective and reflective practices for educating all students in inclusive settings. Instead of separate chapters on students with various disabilities or students from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds, information and classroom-based examples related to these students as well as other students are integrated and embedded in each chapter. It is also important to note that strategies appropriate for one group of students also can be used with other groups of students.

NEW ADDITIONS
AND SPECIAL FEATURES

Content Coverage

Each chapter has been significantly revised to reflect not only what is happening in the field but also how these changes are affecting educators, students, and families, and the delivery of effective instructional programs to all students. Among the changes you will see are:

  • A new chapter (Chapter 12: Evaluating Student Progress and the Effectiveness of Your Inclusion Program) that offers you guidelines and sample assessment devices to evaluate the success of your inclusion program. In addition, this chapter also provides you with new information on authentic and portfolio assessment, testing accommodations, and test-taking skills which can assist you in helping students perform at their optimal levels on standardized and high stakes testing.
  • New content related to diversity, collaboration, and technology integrated into each chapter.
  • Two new sections in Chapter 1—the first includes the latest information on the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and the second provides you with a summary of the latest research on the impact of inclusion on teachers, students, and family members.
  • A broader and more detailed discussion of the IEP in Chapter 2, including guidelines for developing IEPs and implementing them in inclusive settings. Chapter 2 also includes current information about the educational needs of students with low-incidence disabilities, and strategies for educating them in inclusive settings.
  • In Chapter 3, additional information and examples related to differentiating cultural and language differences from learning problems as well as the latest research and programs addressing the needs of students from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds.
  • An expanded discussion of cooperative teaching, working with paraeducators, and communicating with families in Chapter 4.
  • Expanded coverage on strategies and resources for facilitating an acceptance of individual differences and friendships between your students, including specific activities teachers can implement, in Chapter 5.
  • Chapter 6 now contains expanded coverage on helping students make the transition to inclusive settings.
  • New sections on how to conduct a functional assessment and how to prevent students from harming others in Chapter 7.
  • Revisions to Chapters 8, 9, 10, and 11 to include the latest information on differentiating instruction, using technology to support and modify instruction, and using research-based inclusion strategies.

Pedagogical Elements and Special Features

Within each chapter are innovative features designed to help you understand, personalize, and reflect upon the content presented in the book. These features include:

  • Chapter-opening focus questions that serve as advance organizers and provide a structure for the material presented;
  • Summaries at the end of each chapter that address the chapter heading questions and are designed to help you review the main points of each chapter;
  • Informational margin notes that provide you with additional information and resources related to the material in the book;
  • Classroom-based examples and case studies of teachers implementing effective inclusive educational practices in their classrooms;
  • Chapter opening vignettes of a student or teacher, or both, that depict the issues discussed within the chapter;
  • Ideas for Implementation that offer practical examples of the application of techniques in the book that are effective for all students educated in inclusive classrooms; and
  • Examples of effective practices within the text of each chapter.

Each chapter also contains several new features designed to prompt you to reflect upon and interact with the material presented in the book, including:

  • Reflecting on Professional Practices—vignettes describing a classroom experience from the teacher's point of view followed by reflective questions
  • Reflecting on Your Practices—checklists designed to assist you in examining your practices, behaviors, and beliefs
  • What Would You Do in Today's Diverse Classroom—descriptions of classroom situations followed by a set of reflective questions
  • Reflective Margin Notes—questions that ask you to reflect on your personal experiences related to the material in the book.

This textbook also contains several new features designed to introduce you to content about technology and foster your use of technology, including:

  • Set Your Sites margin notes in every chapter link you to websites that offer additional information and resources related to specific topics in the book. These sites can also be accessed via hot links from the companion website, located at ...
Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

PART ONE: UNDERSTANDING THE FOUNDATIONS AND FUNDAMENTALS OF INCLUSION.

1. Understanding Inclusion.
2. Understanding the Diverse Educational Needs of Students with Disabilities.
3. Understanding the Diverse Educational Needs of Learners Who Challenge Schools.

PART TWO: CREATING AN INCLUSIVE ENVIRONMENT THAT SUPPORTS LEARNING FOR ALL STUDENTS.

4. Creating Collaborative Relationships and Fostering Communication.
5. Creating an Environment that Fosters Acceptance and Friendship.
6. Creating Successful Transitions to Inclusive Settings.
7. Creating a Classroom Environment that Promotes Positive Behavior.

PART THREE: DIFFERENTIATING INSTRUCTION FOR ALL STUDENTS.

8. Differentiating Instruction for Diverse Learners.
9. Differentiating Large- and Small-Group Instruction for Diverse Learners.
10. Differentiating Reading, Writing, and Spelling Instruction.
11. Differentiating Mathematics, Science, and Social Studies Instruction.

PART FOUR: EVALUATING INDIVIDUAL AND PROGRAMMATIC PROGRESS.

12. Evaluating Student Progress and the Effectiveness of Your Inclusion Program.
References.
Author Index.
Subject Index.
Read More Show Less

Preface

PREFACE

As reflections of society, our nation's schools have historically been challenged to respond to various societal changes and mandates. In 1954 the Supreme Court, in its decision in the case of Brown v. Board of Education, mandated that schools stop segregating students based on race. With passage of the Education for All Handicapped Children Act of 1975 (PL 94-142), now called the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), Congress required our nation's educational system to include students with disabilities. Within the last 20 years, demographic shifts, economic conditions, and changes in the structure of families have challenged schools to meet the needs of a diverse group of students.

The inclusion movement has developed to meet these educational mandates and challenges. However, there is still a considerable gap between theory and practice. This book is intended to fill that gap by keeping the perspectives of teachers, students, and families in mind, and translating current research on inclusion into effective and reflective classroom practices that address and expand the realities of the classroom setting. Within each chapter are numerous classroom-based examples and case studies of real situations that educators, students, and family members encounter in inclusive classrooms as well as guidelines, strategies, and procedures that have been used to address these situations to educate all students successfully in inclusive classrooms.

The book is designed to serve as a text for undergraduate, graduate, and in-service courses for teachers, ancillary support personnel, and administrators interested in teachingand providing services to students with diverse learning needs. Because of its focus on instructional procedures and collaboration, the book also can serve as a supplementary text for a course on methods or consultation.

ORGANIZATION AND APPROACH

The book is organized into four parts. Part One includes Chapters 1, 2, and 3 and introduces you to the foundations and fundamentals of inclusion and the challenges of its implementation. Part Two includes Chapters 4, 5, 6, and 7 and provides you with strategies for creating an inclusive environment that supports learning for all students. Part Three includes Chapters 8, 9, 10, and 11 and offers you strategies to differentiate instruction to promote the learning of all students within inclusive educational settings. Part Four consists of Chapter 12 which offers a framework and specific strategies and resources for evaluating inclusion programs in terms of individual and programmatic progress.

A Principled Philosophy

The following principles of effective inclusion also provide a framework for this book. These four principles—diversity, individual needs, reflective practice, and collaboration—are integrated into each chapter of the book and demonstrate that inclusion is not just a government mandate but a principled philosophy of reflective, effective teaching.

  • Principle #l: Effective inclusion improves the educational system for all students by placing them together in general education classrooms—regardless of their learning ability, race, linguistic ability, economic status, gender, learning style, ethnicity, cultural background, religion, family structure, and sexual orientation. Inherent in the concept of inclusion is the recognition of the need to individualize the educational system for all students. The result can be an educational system that is more able to accommodate and respond to the individual needs of all students. Thus, changes in the educational system designed to facilitate effective inclusion also benefit all students, teachers, families, ancillary support personnel, and administrators.
  • Principle #2: Effective inclusion involves sensitivity to and acceptance of individual needs and differences. Educators cannot teach students without looking at the various factors that have shaped and will continue to shape their students and make them unique. Therefore, since race, linguistic ability, gender, economic status, and learning ability interact to create a complex amalgam that affects academic performance and socialization, educators, students, and family members must be sensitive to and accepting of individual needs and differences. Educators also must be willing to modify attitudes, instructional techniques, curriculum, and models of family involvement to address and accommodate these needs. Our ability to redefine the mainstream to include the unique needs and differences of students and their families, as well as incorporate their varied visions, voices, and contributions, is critical in expanding the educational, social, and cultural base of our educational system and promoting effective inclusion programs.
  • Principle # 3: Effective inclusion requires reflective educators to modify their attitudes, teaching and classroom management practices, and curricula to accommodate individual needs. Success at creating inclusive classrooms depends on the ability of educators to become effective and reflective practitioners who are able to think critically about their values, beliefs, and practices. They continually engage in self-improvement by reflecting upon and evaluating the impact of their actions on students, families, and other professionals and refining their teaching practices and curricula to facilitate the learning of all students. Therefore, in addition to providing you with effective practices and examples of their use in inclusive settings, the book contains several innovative pedagogical features designed to help you develop your skill as a reflective practitioner.
  • Principle # 4.: Effective inclusion is a group effort which involves collaboration among educators, other professionals, students, families, and community agencies. When these groups work together, the likelihood for effective inclusion is increased. Thus, the book outlines the roles and responsibilities of educators, families, students with disabilities and their peers, and community agencies to promote effective inclusion programs, and offers strategies for integrating these roles so that individuals work collaboratively and communicate regularly.

These four principles, along with the incorporation of instructional technology into each chapter, make the book consistent with professional standards for preparing teachers to work in today's diverse classrooms.

A Non-Categorical Approach

The book is also organized to the serve as a model for creating inclusive classrooms for all students. It is meant to facilitate your development of a holistic approach to educating students while focusing on individual needs rather than on global disability characteristics. Thus, it is not separated into chapters by disability category or cultural and linguistic background that imply and focus on the differences that have been used to segregate students from one another. Rather, the book approaches inclusion as an ongoing, dynamic process for all students. Chapter titles and content relate to and address the key factors that contribute to effective and reflective practices for educating all students in inclusive settings. Instead of separate chapters on students with various disabilities or students from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds, information and classroom-based examples related to these students as well as other students are integrated and embedded in each chapter. It is also important to note that strategies appropriate for one group of students also can be used with other groups of students.

NEW ADDITIONS
AND SPECIAL FEATURES

Content Coverage

Each chapter has been significantly revised to reflect not only what is happening in the field but also how these changes are affecting educators, students, and families, and the delivery of effective instructional programs to all students. Among the changes you will see are:

  • A new chapter (Chapter 12: Evaluating Student Progress and the Effectiveness of Your Inclusion Program) that offers you guidelines and sample assessment devices to evaluate the success of your inclusion program. In addition, this chapter also provides you with new information on authentic and portfolio assessment, testing accommodations, and test-taking skills which can assist you in helping students perform at their optimal levels on standardized and high stakes testing.
  • New content related to diversity, collaboration, and technology integrated into each chapter.
  • Two new sections in Chapter 1—the first includes the latest information on the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and the second provides you with a summary of the latest research on the impact of inclusion on teachers, students, and family members.
  • A broader and more detailed discussion of the IEP in Chapter 2, including guidelines for developing IEPs and implementing them in inclusive settings. Chapter 2 also includes current information about the educational needs of students with low-incidence disabilities, and strategies for educating them in inclusive settings.
  • In Chapter 3, additional information and examples related to differentiating cultural and language differences from learning problems as well as the latest research and programs addressing the needs of students from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds.
  • An expanded discussion of cooperative teaching, working with paraeducators, and communicating with families in Chapter 4.
  • Expanded coverage on strategies and resources for facilitating an acceptance of individual differences and friendships between your students, including specific activities teachers can implement, in Chapter 5.
  • Chapter 6 now contains expanded coverage on helping students make the transition to inclusive settings.
  • New sections on how to conduct a functional assessment and how to prevent students from harming others in Chapter 7.
  • Revisions to Chapters 8, 9, 10, and 11 to include the latest information on differentiating instruction, using technology to support and modify instruction, and using research-based inclusion strategies.

Pedagogical Elements and Special Features

Within each chapter are innovative features designed to help you understand, personalize, and reflect upon the content presented in the book. These features include:

  • Chapter-opening focus questions that serve as advance organizers and provide a structure for the material presented;
  • Summaries at the end of each chapter that address the chapter heading questions and are designed to help you review the main points of each chapter;
  • Informational margin notes that provide you with additional information and resources related to the material in the book;
  • Classroom-based examples and case studies of teachers implementing effective inclusive educational practices in their classrooms;
  • Chapter opening vignettes of a student or teacher, or both, that depict the issues discussed within the chapter;
  • Ideas for Implementation that offer practical examples of the application of techniques in the book that are effective for all students educated in inclusive classrooms; and
  • Examples of effective practices within the text of each chapter.

Each chapter also contains several new features designed to prompt you to reflect upon and interact with the material presented in the book, including:

  • Reflecting on Professional Practices—vignettes describing a classroom experience from the teacher's point of view followed by reflective questions
  • Reflecting on Your Practices—checklists designed to assist you in examining your practices, behaviors, and beliefs
  • What Would You Do in Today's Diverse Classroom—descriptions of classroom situations followed by a set of reflective questions
  • Reflective Margin Notes—questions that ask you to reflect on your personal experiences related to the material in the book.

This textbook also contains several new features designed to introduce you to content about technology and foster your use of technology, including:

  • Set Your Sites margin notes in every chapter link you to websites that offer additional information and resources related to specific topics in the book. These sites can also be accessed via hot links from the companion website, located at http://www.prenhall.com/salend.
  • Video Insights, which appear in Chapters 1, 7, 8, and 12, link chapter content to the video segments included in the ABC News/Prentice Hall video library and to the streaming video that can be downloaded from the companion website, located at http://www.prenhall.com/salend.
  • The Developing Quality IEPs: A Case-Based Tutorial CD-ROM will walk you through the development of IEPs and the criteria necessary to assess their quality. One of the tutorials is based on the case of Marty, featured in Chapter 2. The CDROM is also integrated into Chapter 2 via margin notes.

ANCILLARIES

The ancillaries and supplements package for the fourth edition has been expanded considerably. Several new, exciting supplements are now available for students and instructors, and the high-quality supplements that have always been offered with the text have been thoroughly revised and expanded.

  • Instructor's Manual—The fourth edition includes an Instructor's Manual to assist students and instructors in using the text.-Chapters in the manual parallel the organization and content of the text. Each chapter of the manual includes chapter objectives, chapter overview, transparency masters (NEW), learning activities, as well as a comprehensive test bank containing both short-answer and essay questions.
  • Computerized Testbank Software—The computerized testbank software gives instructors electronic access to the test questions printed in the Instructor's Manual, allowing them to create and customize exams on their computer. The software can help professors manage their courses and gain insight into their students' progress and performance. Computerized testbank software is available in both Macintosh and PC/Windows versions.
  • Video Library (NEW)—The ABC/Prentice Hall video library contains 3 compelling programs: Sean's Story, a video about one boy's experiences becoming a part of an inclusive classroom; Survival Lessons, an examination of school-based mental health programs; and Common Miracles, an in-depth look at new strategies for teaching and learning, such as cooperative learning and multiple intelligences. Evaluating the Effectiveness of Inclusion: A Video Case Study of Memorial High School includes interviews with a mix of students with and without disabilities, and is available as streaming video on the companion website. The Video Insights boxes throughout the text can be used to link the video programming to the text and to promote lively, thoughtful classroom discussion of critical—and sometimes controversial—issues in education.
  • Companion Website (NEW!)&&151;Located at http://www.prenhall.com/salend, the companion website for this text includes a wealth of resources for both students and professors. The Syllabus Manager enables professors to create and maintain the class syllabus online while also allowing the student access to the syllabus at any time from any computer on the Internet. Focus Questions and Chapter Summaries help students review chapter content. Students can test their knowledge by taking interactive Self-Tests—multiplechoice quizzes that provide immediate feedback with a percentage score and correct answers—or responding to Essay Questions that can be submitted to instructors or study partners via email. The Set Your Sites feature contains hot links to all the websites mentioned in the margins of the text and assists students in using the Web to do additional research on chapter topics and key issues. In the Video Case Study module, students can watch streaming video online and then respond to reflective questions. Both the Message Board and Live Chat features encourage student interaction outside of the classroom. Finally, the Resources module houses a special education resources supersite and a variety of forms and checklists that can be downloaded.
  • Developing Quality IEPs: A Case-based Tutorial (NEW!)—The CD-ROM packaged with this text will walk you through the development of IEPs and the criteria necessary to assess their quality. To help you learn more about developing quality IEPs, the CD-ROM provides two interactive tutorials, six case studies with related exercises, and a variety of additional resources to help you implement IEPs in general education settings. These resources include web links, journal articles, assessment and year-end review evaluation forms, checklists, tips, and guidelines.
  • Student Study Guide (NEW!)—The Student Study Guide provides students with additional opportunities to review chapter content as well as offering many support mechanisms to help them learn and study more effectively. These include chapter outlines and summaries, key terms, application and reflective exercises, and self-tests.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

This book is a result of the collaborative efforts of my students, colleagues, friends, and relatives. The book is an outgrowth of many ideas I learned from students at Woodlawn Junior High School (Buffalo, New York) and Public School 76 (Bronx, New York), colleagues from PS 76-George Bonnici, Nydia Figueroa-Torres, Jean Gee, and Jean Barber-and colleagues at the University of Kentucky, and the State University of New York at New Paltz. Much of the information in this book was learned through interactions with teachers, administrators, and students in the Easton (Pennsylvania) Area School District and the New Paltz (New York) School District, who both welcomed me and shared their experiences. Many of the examples and vignettes are based on the experiences of my students at the State University of New York at New Paltz. I truly value my colleagues and students, who continue to educate me and add to my appreciation of the remarkable dedication and skill of teachers.

I also want to acknowledge my students, colleagues, and friends who provided support and guidance throughout all stages of the book. I especially want to recognize Lee Bell, John Boyd, Meenakshi Gajria, Judy Dorney Luis Garrido, Charleen Gottschalk, Margaret Gutierrez, Karen Giek, Mark Metzger, Bob Michael, Jean Mumper, Helen Musumeci, Kathy Pike, Sarah Ryan, Robin Smith, Lorraine Taylor, Margaret Wade-Lewis, Halee Vang, and Catharine Whittaker for supporting and inspiring me throughout the process. My deepest appreciation also goes to Laurel Garrick Duhaney for preparing the innovative instructor's manual that accompanies this book and to Connie D'Alessandro for her invaluable assistance in coordinating various aspects of the book.

This book would not have been possible without the efforts and skills of Gianna Marsella, who provided me with the professional and emotional support needed to enhance many aspects of the book. Her subtle and at times direct prodding helped me to create a more readable, practically-oriented, and pedagogically sound book. I also appreciate the work of Ann Davis, Pat Grogg, Helen Greenberg, and Sheryl Langner. I also am grateful to the following reviewers: Marie Brand, New York University; Frederick J. Bartelheim, University of Northern Colorado; Jim Burns, The College of St. Rose (NY); Moon K. Chang, Alabama State University; Younghee M. Kim, Oregon State University; Rori R. Carson, Eastern Illinois University; Robert J. Evans, Marshall University; Robert W Ortiz, New Mexico State University; Colleen Shea Stump, San Francisco State University; and Qaisar Sultana, Eastern Kentucky University. Their thoughtful and professional comments helped to shape and improve the book.

I want to dedicate this book to Suzanne Salend, my collaborator in life, Jack Salend, my son, and Madison Salend, my granddaughter, in recognition of their love, spirit, intelligence, encouragement, strength, and passion. They have taught me how to accept and grow from a challenge. I hope that this book will help you accept and grow from the challenge of creating inclusive classrooms for all students.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 15, 2010

    Great textbook for Special Ed

    I was very impressed with the cost of this textbook. I saved more from Barnes and Noble than purchasing it at the University bookstore. I was also pleased with the speedy delivery with no additional cost.
    The text itself is quite comprehensive and thorough with many extras, but I did not purchase the companion disk for an additional cost so it's hard to say if that component is useful.

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