Creating Innovators (Enhanced eBook): The Making of Young People Who Will Change the World [NOOK Book]

Overview

In this groundbreaking book, education expert Tony Wagner provides a powerful rationale for developing an innovation-driven economy. He explores what parents, teachers, and employers must do to develop the capacities of young people to become innovators. In profiling compelling young American innovators such as Kirk Phelps, product manager for Apple?s first iPhone, and Jodie Wu, who founded a company that builds bicycle-powered maize shellers in Tanzania, Wagner reveals how the adults in their lives nurtured ...
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Creating Innovators (Enhanced eBook): The Making of Young People Who Will Change the World

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Overview

In this groundbreaking book, education expert Tony Wagner provides a powerful rationale for developing an innovation-driven economy. He explores what parents, teachers, and employers must do to develop the capacities of young people to become innovators. In profiling compelling young American innovators such as Kirk Phelps, product manager for Apple’s first iPhone, and Jodie Wu, who founded a company that builds bicycle-powered maize shellers in Tanzania, Wagner reveals how the adults in their lives nurtured their creativity and sparked their imaginations, while teaching them to learn from failures and persevere. Wagner identifies a pattern—a childhood of creative play leads to deep-seated interests, which in adolescence and adulthood blossom into a deeper purpose for career and life goals. Play, passion, and purpose: These are the forces that drive young innovators.
     Wagner shows how we can apply this knowledge as educators and what parents can do to compensate for poor schooling. He takes readers into the most forward-thinking schools, colleges, and workplaces in the country, where teachers and employers are developing cultures of innovation based on collaboration, interdisciplinary problem-solving, and intrinsic motivation. The result is a timely, provocative, and inspiring manifesto that will change how we look at our schools and workplaces, and provide us with a road map for creating the change makers of tomorrow.
     Creating Innovators will feature its own innovative elements: more than sixty original videos that expand on key ideas in the book through interviews with young innovators, teachers, writers, CEOs, and entrepreneurs, including Thomas Friedman, Dean Kamen, and Annmarie Neal. Produced by filmmaker Robert A. Compton, the videos are embedded directly into this eBook file and may also be accessed by visiting www.creatinginnovators.com.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781451688542
  • Publisher: Scribner
  • Publication date: 4/17/2012
  • Sold by: SIMON & SCHUSTER
  • Format: eBook
  • Edition description: No Edition
  • Pages: 288
  • Sales rank: 119,363
  • File size: 534 MB
  • Note: This product may take a few minutes to download.

Meet the Author

Tony Wagner has served as Co-Director of the Change Leadership Group (CLG) at the Harvard Graduate School of Education since its inception in 2000.  An initiative of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, CLG is a “R & D” center that helps teams to be effective change leaders in schools and districts.  He also was on the faculty of the Executive Leadership Program for Educators, a joint initiative of Harvard’s Graduate School of Education, Business School, and Kennedy School of Government.  Tony consults widely to public and independent schools, districts, and foundations around the country and internationally and has served as Senior Advisor to the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation for eight years. 

Tony has worked for more than thirty-five years in the field of school improvement, and he is a frequent keynote speaker and widely published author on education and society.  Prior to assuming his current position at Harvard, Tony was a high school teacher for twelve years; a school principal; a university professor in teacher education; co-founder and first executive director of Educators for Social Responsibility; project director for the Public Agenda Foundation in New York; and President and CEO of the Institute for Responsive Education. He earned his a Masters of Arts in Teaching and Doctorate in Education at Harvard University.  

 Tony’s publications include numerous articles and four previous books.

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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing all of 13 Customer Reviews
  • Posted August 16, 2012

    This book is right on. Though a strong knowledge base is import

    This book is right on. Though a strong knowledge base is important, how
    we teach it to kids and show them how to use it so that they can be more
    than passive employees is what thi book is all about. Insightful and
    absolutely inspiring. I sooooooo agree with Tony Wager. His ideas are
    what I am doing with my two kids.t

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 13, 2012

    forbes recommended...

    see article in forbes 4/25/2004

    Creating Innovators: Why America's Education System Is Obsolete


    America’s last competitive advantage — its ability to innovate — is at risk as a result of the country’s lackluster education system, according to research by Harvard Innovation Education Fellow Tony Wagner.

    Taking the stage at Skillshare’s Penny Conference, Wagner pointed out the skills it takes to become an innovator, the downfalls of America’s current education system, and how parents, teachers, mentors, and employers can band together to create innovators.

    American schools educate to fill children with knowledge — instead they should be focusing on developing students’ innovation skills and motivation to succeed, he says:

    “Today knowledge is ubiquitous, constantly changing, growing exponentially… Today knowledge is free. It’s like air, it’s like water. It’s become a commodity… There’s no competitive advantage today in knowing more than the person next to you. The world doesn’t care what you know. What the world cares about is what you can do with what you know.”

    Knowledge that children are encouraged to soak up in American schools — the memorization of planets, state capitals, the Periodic Table of Elements — can only take students so far. But “skill and will” determine a child’s ability to think outside of the box, he says.

    Over two year of research involving interviews with executives, college teachers, community leaders, and recent graduates, Wagner defined the skills needed for Americans to stay competitive in an increasingly globalized workforce. As lined out in his book, “The Global Achievement Gap,” that set of core competencies that every student must master before the end of high school is:

    - Critical thinking and problem solving (the ability to ask the right questions)

    - Collaboration across networks and leading by influence

    - Agility and adaptability

    - Initiative and entrepreneurialism

    - Accessing and analyzing information

    - Effective written and oral communication

    - Curiosity and imagination

    For his latest book, “Creating Innovators: The Making of Young People Who Will Change The World,” Wagner has extended his studies to address the problem of how we teach students these skills. He has come to the conclusion that our country’s economic problems are based in its education system.

    “We’ve created an economy based on people spending money they do not have to buy things they may not need, threatening the planet in the process,” he says. “We have to transition from a consumer-driven economy to an innovation-driven economy.”

    In an effort to discern teaching and parenting patterns, Wagner interviewed innovators in their 20s, followed by interviews with their parents and the influential teachers and mentors in the students’ lives. He found stunning similarities between the teaching styles and goals he encountered with these influential teachers at all levels of education and concludes, “The culture of schooling as we all know it is radically at odds with the culture of learning that produces innovators.” He identified five ways in which America’s education system is stunting innovation:

    1. Individual achievement is the focus: Students spend a bulk of their time focusing on improving their GPAs — school is a competition among peers. “But innovation is a team sport,” says Wagner. “Yes, it requires some solitude and reflection, but fundamentally problems are too complex to innovat

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 20, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    Tony Wagner, the Innovation Education Fellow at the Technology &

    Tony Wagner, the Innovation Education Fellow at the Technology & Entrepreneurship Center at Harvard University, has created an impassioned guide to nurturing young innovators. He recounts the challenges creative students are facing as they struggle to change the world, and he describes the rigid educational systems they have to confront. Wagner punctuates chapter sections with Quick Response (QR) codes, which readers can scan with their smart devices to access extra materials, including interview videos that expand on key points. He offers readers take-away lessons on the importance of innovation and urges a renewed commitment to promoting innovation among young people. Parents and educators form the primary audience for Wagner’s presentation, but getAbstract also recommends his insights to anyone interested in innovation, social policy and the shaping of a vibrant economy.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 13, 2014

    Wouldn't work on ipad help

    This book for some reason wouldn't work in my nook app on my iPad.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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    Posted July 24, 2013

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    Posted April 17, 2012

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    Posted November 14, 2012

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    Posted January 3, 2013

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