Creating Military Power: The Sources of Military Effectiveness

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2007 Hardcover Good Item may show signs of shelf wear. Pages may include limited notes and highlighting. Includes supplemental or companion materials if applicable. Access ... codes may or may not work. Connecting readers since 1972. Customer service is our top priority. Read more Show Less

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Overview


“Rigorous social science too often treats military power as the epiphenomenon of economic or technological resources. This impressive volume helps rectify that common mistake. It explores and details how what really matters—the actual effectiveness of militaries—depends on complex social, political, diplomatic, and organizational underpinnings.” --Richard K. Betts,Director, Saltzman Institute of War and Peace Studies, Columbia University
“Creating Military Power is creative and rigorous, attentive to historical detail, and concerned with policy implications. It will undoubtedly be read with great enthusiasm by specialists on international security in both the academy and think tanks.”
—Ronald R. Krebs, University of Minnesota
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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"This book's sensible premise is that a state's military power—often measured by gross national product, industrial capacity, population size, number of troops, and arsenal—does not necessarily determine military effectiveness... [Creating Military Power] is an excellent set of essays that specialists on military-security issues will read with much profit."—CHOICE

"Rigorous social science too often treats military power as the epiphenomenon of economic or technological resources. This impressive volume helps rectify that common mistake. It explores and details how what really matters—the actual effectiveness of militaries—depends on complex social, political, diplomatic, and organizational underpinnings."—Richard K. Betts,Director, Saltzman Institute of War and Peace Studies, Columbia University

"Creating Military Power is creative and rigorous, attentive to historical detail, and concerned with policy implications. It will undoubtedly be read with great enthusiasm by specialists on international security in both the academy and think tanks." —Ronald R. Krebs, University of Minnesota

"Comprising a conceptual framework, seven substantive chapters, a critical individual synthesis reflecting on the book itself and a summary conclusion, this edited book provides a set of constructive conceptual and empirical contributions to international relations, political science, and military studies." —H-Net

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780804753999
  • Publisher: Stanford University Press
  • Publication date: 4/9/2007
  • Edition description: 1
  • Pages: 264
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.80 (d)

Meet the Author


Risa A. Brooks is Assistant Professor of Political Science at Northwestern University. Elizabeth A. Stanley is Assistant Professor in the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service and in the Department of Government at Georgetown University.
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Table of Contents


Contributors     vii
Acknowledgments     ix
Introduction: The Impact of Culture, Society, Institutions, and International Forces on Military Effectiveness   Risa A. Brooks     1
Nationalism and Military Effectiveness: Post-Meiji Japan   Dan Reiter     27
Social Structure, Ethnicity, and Military Effectiveness: Iraq, 1980-2004   Timothy D. Hoyt     55
Political Institutions and Military Effectiveness: Contemporary United States and United Kingdom   Deborah Avant     80
Civil-Military Relations and Military Effectiveness: Egypt in the 1967 and 1973 Wars   Risa A. Brooks     106
Global Norms and Military Effectiveness: The Army in Early Twentieth-Century Ireland   Theo Farrell     136
International Competition and Military Effectiveness: Naval Air Power, 1919-1945   Emily O. Goldman     158
International Alliances and Military Effectiveness: Fighting Alongside Allies and Partners   Nora Bensahel     186
Explaining Military Outcomes   Stephen Biddle     207
Conclusion   Risa A. Brooks     228
Index     239
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Recipe

Creating Military Power examines how societies, cultures, political structures, and the global environment affect countries' military organizations. Unlike most analyses of countries' military power, which focus on material and basic resources—such as the size of populations, technological and industrial base, and GNP—this volume takes a more expansive view. The study's overarching argument is that states' global environments and the particularities of their cultures, social structures, and political institutions often affect how they organize and prepare for war, and ultimately impact their effectiveness in battle. The creation of military power is only partially dependent on states' basic material and human assets. Wealth, technology, and human capital certainly matter for a country's ability to create military power, but equally important are the ways a state uses those resources, and this often depends on the political and social environment in which military activity takes place.

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