Creating the Market University: How Academic Science Became an Economic Engine

Overview

"Many scholars have opined about the new entrepreneurial university, but few have carefully and analytically explored its historical origins. Elizabeth Popp Berman masterfully charts the roads traveled from the ivory tower to the market, and brilliantly illuminates how political choices and financial forces shaped the process that now celebrates universities as engines of economic development."—Walter W. Powell, Stanford University

"Much of the scholarship on university-industry relations, or more broadly the ...

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Creating the Market University: How Academic Science Became an Economic Engine

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Overview

"Many scholars have opined about the new entrepreneurial university, but few have carefully and analytically explored its historical origins. Elizabeth Popp Berman masterfully charts the roads traveled from the ivory tower to the market, and brilliantly illuminates how political choices and financial forces shaped the process that now celebrates universities as engines of economic development."—Walter W. Powell, Stanford University

"Much of the scholarship on university-industry relations, or more broadly the commercialization of the university, is ahistorical. Creating the Market University not only shows variations across time in the array of university-industry relations experimented with, but it makes a nuanced historical argument to explain their success in the 1980s. Sound and exciting, this book is a pleasure to read."—Daniel Kleinman, University of Wisconsin—Madison

"Extending arguments and evidence in economics, sociology, education, management, and technology policy, Creating the Market University provides a sophisticated and compelling account of how academic scientists, and the universities within which they are embedded, increasingly embraced a market logic that valorizes patenting and technology commercialization. Elizabeth Popp Berman demonstrates the importance of understanding how scientific and technological innovation at universities serves as an engine of economic growth."—Michael Lounsbury, University of Alberta

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Editorial Reviews

Journal of American History - John Rudolph
Creating the Market University succeeds in providing detailed, on-the-ground descriptions of the diverse decisions and events that worked together to create what amounts to a new social compact with academic science. . . . [T]his is a valuable work that offers significant insights into how science in the academy arrived at where it is today.
From the Publisher
Winner of the 2013 Pierre Bourdieu Award for Best Book, Sociology of Education Section of the American Sociological Association

Winner of the 2013 Max Weber Book Award, Organizations, Occupations, and Work Section of the American Sociological Association

Winner of the 2011 President's Book Award, Social Science History Association

"Creating the Market University succeeds in providing detailed, on-the-ground descriptions of the diverse decisions and events that worked together to create what amounts to a new social compact with academic science. . . . [T]his is a valuable work that offers significant insights into how science in the academy arrived at where it is today."—John Rudolph, Journal of American History

"This volume provides the most thorough and balanced account of the advent of commercialization in academic science and its underlying causes."—Roger L. Geige, American Historical Review

"This is a great book for wonks. On page after page, data regarding academia, high-tech innovation and entrepreneurship stand up, and shout for attention."—Stephen B. Adams, Enterprise & Society

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780691147086
  • Publisher: Princeton University Press
  • Publication date: 1/8/2012
  • Pages: 278
  • Sales rank: 1,005,275
  • Product dimensions: 6.10 (w) x 9.30 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Meet the Author

Elizabeth Popp Berman is assistant professor of sociology at the University at Albany, State University of New York.

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Table of Contents

Acknowledgments ix

Chapter 1: Academic Science as an Economic Engine 1
The Changing Nature of Academic Science 4
Studying the Changes in Academic Science 8
Explaining the Rise of Market Logic in Academic Science 12
Overview of the Book 17

Chapter 2: Market Logic in the Era of Pure Science 19
Federal Funding and the Support of Science Logic 21
Using Market Logic in the 1950s and 1960s 23
Limits to the Spread of Market Logic 29
The Pillars of the Postwar System Begin to Crumble 35
The Effects of the Dissolving Federal Consensus 37

Chapter 3: Innovation Drives the Economy-an Old Idea with New Implications 40
Market-Logic Practices of the 1970s and Their Limits 42
The Political Power of an Economic Idea 44
The Innovation Frame and the University 55

Chapter 4: Faculty Entrepreneurship in the Biosciences 58
Before Biotech 60
Early Entrepreneurship 63
1978: A Turning Point 69
Academic Entrepreneurship: Money Changes Everything 76
Why Did Bioscience Entrepreneurship Take Off? 87

Chapter 5: Patenting University Inventions 94
University Patenting during the Science-Logic Era 96
Barriers to the Expansion of University Patenting 104
Innovation, the Economy, and Government Patent Policy 106
University Patenting after 1980 111
Why Did University Patenting Take Off? 114

Chapter 6: Creating University-Industry Research Centers 119
UIRCs versus Biotech Entrepreneurship and University Patenting 119
The Trajectory of University-Industry Research Centers 122
The Emergence of Federal and State Support for UIRCs 131
The Expansion of State and Federal Support for UIRCs in the 1980s 139
Why Did University-Industry Research Centers Spread? 141

Chapter 7: The Spread of Market Logic 146
The Expansion of Biotech Entrepreneurship, Patenting, and UIRCs 147
Market Logic Elsewhere in Academic Science 149
University Administrators and the Rhetoric of Innovation 154
Science Logic and Market Logic: An Uneasy Coexistence 156

Chapter 8: Conclusion 158
How Academic Science Became an Economic Engine:Considering the Evidence 159
Reconsidering Alternative Arguments 162
Speaking to Larger Conversations 167

Notes 179
Bibliography 221
Index 261

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