Creating Web Pages with HTML Simplified

Creating Web Pages with HTML Simplified

5.0 6
by Maran
     
 
Authoring attractive, dynamic Web pages has never been easier, thanks to Creating Web Pages with HTML Simplified, 2nd Edition. This full-color, easy-to-follow guide is an indispensable tool for both first-timers and seasoned Web authors. Here, full-color illustrations and concise captions take you through all phases of Web publishing, from laying out and

Overview

Authoring attractive, dynamic Web pages has never been easier, thanks to Creating Web Pages with HTML Simplified, 2nd Edition. This full-color, easy-to-follow guide is an indispensable tool for both first-timers and seasoned Web authors. Here, full-color illustrations and concise captions take you through all phases of Web publishing, from laying out and formatting text to enlivening pages with graphics and applets. Add links, format tables and include forms on your Web page; in no time you'll be ready to build in sounds, video, frames and style sheets! Creating Web Pages with HTML Simplified, 2nd Edition also helps explain the many options available to you when the time to comes to publish your pages. Explore the many ways you can publish your work with Web presence providers, test your Web pages before they go live, and publicize your site to attract a large audience. Creating Web Pages with HTML Simplified, 2nd Edition is both informative and enlightening; this book is a keeper for anyone interested in broadening their presence on the Web.

About the Author:
Ruth Maran is the Author and Architect of maranGraphics books. She creates the words and structure that are the basis for the books.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780764560675
Publisher:
Wiley, John & Sons, Incorporated
Publication date:
01/28/1999
Series:
Visual Series
Edition description:
Older Edition
Pages:
225
Product dimensions:
8.49(w) x 9.96(h) x 0.59(d)

Related Subjects

Read an Excerpt

Creating Web Pages with HTML Simplified


By Ruth Maran

John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 0-7645-6067-0


Chapter One

GETTING STARTED

Are you ready to begin creating Web pages? This chapter will provide you with the basics you need to get started.

Set Up a Web Page 28 Display Web Page in Web Browser 32 Display Web Page Changes in Web Browser 34 Start a New Paragraph 36 Start a New Line 38 Center Text 39 Add a Heading 40 Using Preformatted Text 42 Add a Comment 43 Insert Special Characters 44

SET UP A WEB PAGE

You can create a Web page using a word processor or text editor.

For information on word processors and text editors, see page 24.

1 Start the word processor or text editor you will use to create a Web page. In this example, we started Microsoft WordPad.

2 Type the text you want to appear on the Web page.

* Do not format the text. You must use HTML tags to format the text.

3 Check the Web page for spelling and grammar errors.

4 Click [??] to save the Web page.

* The Save As dialog box appears.

5 Type a name for the Web page. Make sure you add the .html or .htm extension to the Web page name.

Note: A Web page name can contain letters and numbers, but no spaces. The main Web page is usually named index.html.

* This area shows the location where the program will store the Web page. You can click this area to change the location.

6 Click this area to list the ways you can save the Web page.

7 Click TextDocument.

8 Click Save.

* A dialog box will appear, stating that all formatting will be removed from the Web page. Click Yes to save the Web page.

There are some basic HTML tags you must add to every Web page you create.

Why does the text scroll off my screen?

When you type text in a text editor or simple word processor, the text may scroll off the screen. When you view the document in a Web browser, the text will fit properly on the screen. You can choose to wrap text in a text editor or word processor.

To wrap text in Microsoft WordPad:

1 Click View.

2 Click Options. The Options dialog box appears.

3 Click Wrap to window.

4 Click OK.

HTML TAGS

You need to identify a document as a Web page.

1 Type [HTML] before all the text on the Web page.

2 Type [/HTML] after all the text on the Web page.

* Although Web browsers can display a Web page without the HTML tags, it is considered proper form to include these tags.

HEAD TAGS

The head contains information about a Web page, such as the title.

1 Type [HEAD] directly below the [HTML] tag.

2 Press the Enter key twice.

3 Type [/HEAD].

* Although Web browsers can display a Web page without the HEAD tags, it is considered proper form to include these tags.

What title should I use for my Web page?

You should choose a brief, descriptive title that will interest people in reading your Web page. Use a title such as "Golf Tournaments" rather than a less descriptive title such as "Chapter Two" or "My Home Page."

TITLE TAGS

You must give a Web page a title that describes its contents. The title usually appears in the title bar of a Web browser window.

1 Type [TITLE] directly below the [HEAD] tag.

2 Type the title of the Web page, using only letters and numbers (A to Z and 0 to 9).

3 Type [/TITLE].

BODY TAGS

You must place the BODY tags around the contents of a Web page.

1 Type [/BODY] directly above the [/HTML] tag.

2 Type [BODY] directly below the [/HEAD] tag.

DISPLAY WEB PAGE IN WEB BROWSER

You can display your Web page in a Web browser. This allows you to see how your Web page will appear on the Web.

To display a Web page in a Web browser, you need a Web browser program such as Microsoft Internet Explorer or Netscape Navigator. For information on where you can obtain a Web browser program, see page 7.

Should I display my Web page in more than one Web browser?

Yes. You should display your Web page in several Web browsers so you can see how each browser will display your Web page. Each Web browser will display your Web page in a slightly different way. The most popular Web browsers are Microsoft Internet Explorer and Netscape Navigator.

1 Start the Web browser you want to use to display your Web page. In this example, we started Microsoft Internet Explorer.

2 To open your Web page in the Web browser, click File.

3 Click Open.

* The Open dialog box appears.

4 Click Browse to locate the Web page on your computer.

Note: If you are using Netscape Navigator, click Choose File.

* The Microsoft Internet Explorer dialog box appears.

* This area shows the location of the displayed Web pages. You can click this area to change the location.

5 Click the Web page you want to open.

6 Click Open.

7 Click OK in the Open dialog box.

Note: If you are using Netscape Navigator, click Open.

* The Web page appears in the Web browser.

* If you later make changes to the Web page, you can display the updated page in the Web browser. To display changes you make to a Web page in a Web browser, see page 34.

DISPLAY WEB PAGE CHANGES IN WEB BROWSER

If you make changes to your Web page, you can display the changes in a Web browser to see how the updated

Can other people view my Web page?

Even though you can display your Web page in a Web browser, other people on the Web cannot view your Web page. When you complete your Web page, you must transfer the page to a company that makes Web pages available on the Web before other people can view the page. For information on companies that make Web pages available on the Web, see page 192.

CHANGE A WEB PAGE

1 Start the program you used to create your Web page. In this example, we started Microsoft WordPad.

2 Open the Web page you want to change.

3 Make the desired changes to the Web page. In this example, we added a paragraph of text.

4 Click [??] to save your changes.

DISPLAY CHANGES IN WEB BROWSER

1 Display the Web page in a Web browser. To display a Web page in a Web browser, see page 32.

2 Click Refresh to display your changes in the Web browser.

Note: If you are using Netscape Navigator, click Reload.

START A NEW PARAGRAPH

When creating a Web page, you must specify where you want each paragraph to begin.

What determines the width of the paragraphs on my Web page?

The width of your paragraphs depends on the width of the Web browser window. If a reader changes the size of a Web browser window, the width of the paragraphs will also change. This ensures that a reader will always see all the text in the paragraphs on the screen.

1 Type [P] in front of each paragraph on your Web page.

2 Type [/P] after each paragraph on your Web page.

* The Web browser displays a blank line between each paragraph.

* To display your Web page in a Web browser, see pages 32 to 35.

CHANGE PARAGRAPH ALIGNMENT

1 In the [P] tag for the paragraph you want to change, type ALIGN=? replacing ? with the way you want to align the paragraph (left, center or right).

* The Web browser displays the paragraph with the alignment you selected.

* To display your Web page in a Web browser, see pages 32 to 35.

Note: The ALIGN attribute is still supported by Web browsers, but the use of style sheets is now preferred. For information on style sheets, see page 172.

START A NEW LINE

When creating a Web page, you must specify where you want each new line of text

Starting a new line is useful for separating short lines of text, such as text in a mailing address or poem.

1 Type [BR] in front of each line of text you want to appear on its own line.

* The Web browser displays each line of text on its own line.

* To display your Web page in a Web browser, see pages 32 to 35.

CENTER TEXT

You can center text on your Web page. Centering text can help you emphasize important information.

You should only center short phrases since long paragraphs can be difficult to read when centered.

1 Type [CENTER] in front of the text you want to center.

2 Type [/CENTER] after the text you want to center.

* The Web browser centers the text.

* To display your Web page in a Web browser, see pages 32 to 35.

Note: The CENTER tag is still supported by Web browsers, but the use of style sheets is now preferred. For information on style sheets, see page 172.

ADD A HEADING

You can use headings to help organize the information on your Web page.

There are six heading levels you can use. You should avoid using more than three different heading levels on a single Web page.

1 Type [/H?] after the text you want to make a heading. Replace ? with the number you used in step 1.

Note: For information on the heading levels, see the top of page 41.

2 Type [/H?] in front of the text you want to make a heading. Replace ? with the number of the heading level you want to use, from 1 to 6.

* The Web browser displays the heading.

* To display your Web page in a Web browser, see pages 32 to 35.

What heading levels should I use?

Levels 1, 2 and 3 are often used for Web page and section titles.

Level 4 is usually used for the main text on a Web page.

Levels 5 and 6 are often used for copyright and disclaimer information.

CHANGE HEADING ALIGNMENT

1 In the [H?] tag for the heading you want to change, type ALIGN=? replacing ? with the way you want to align the heading (left, center or right).

* The Web browser displays the heading with the alignment you selected.

* To display your Web page in a Web browser, see pages 32 to 35.

Note: The ALIGN attribute is still supported by Web browsers, but the use of style sheets is now preferred. For information on style sheets, see page 172.

USING PREFORMATTED TEXT

A Web browser usually ignores blank lines and extra spaces you add when typing the text for your Web page. You can use tags to retain the spacing of text you type.

Preformatted text is useful for creating a simple table.

* Make sure you use spaces, not tabs, to line up columns of information. You should also use a monospaced font, such as Courier, so you can see exactly how the text will appear in a Web browser.

1 Type [PRE] in front of the text you want to display as preformatted text.

2 Type [/PRE] after the text you want to display as preformatted text.

* The Web browser displays the text with the same spacing you used when creating the Web page.

* To display your Web page in a Web browser, see pages 32 to 35.

ADD A COMMENT

You can add a comment to your Web page that will not appear when readers view your Web page.

You can add comments to remind you to update a section of text or indicate why you used a specific tag.

1 Type [!- where you want to add a comment. Then press the Spacebar.

2 Type the comment. Then press the Spacebar.

3 Type -] to complete the comment.

* The Web browser does not display the comment on your Web page.

* To display your Web page in a Web browser, see pages 32 to 35.

* Keep in mind that readers can choose to view the HTML tags you used to create your Web page. Readers who view the HTML tags will be able to read any comments you added to the Web page.

INSERT SPECIAL CHARACTERS You can add special characters that do not appear on your keyboard to your

You must perform the steps below to add characters that are used for creating Web pages, such as [, ], ' or &.

1 Position the cursor where you want the special character to appear on your Web page.

2 Type the code for the special character (example: ©).

* The Web browser displays the special character.

* To display your Web page in a Web browser, see pages 32 to 35.

* The appearance of the special character depends on the Web browser and font settings a reader uses.

(Continues...)



Excerpted from Creating Web Pages with HTML Simplified by Ruth Maran Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Creating Web Pages with HTML Simplified 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 6 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is a great book for begginer's looking to learn the basics of HTML. I reccomend this book for all AGES!
Guest More than 1 year ago
I recommend this book for people who a beginners but even more so for people who just learn best visually. It's colorful and shows examples for everything. If you like this book also try ... Learn HTML visually (i think thats the name) also a great visual book.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The pictures are very vivid...and uses cute icons to "walk you through" the steps. I recommend this book to anyone. Its a great supplement to any textbook. Enjoy!
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is the best book for HTML. It is easy to understand, and is great for Beginers to the best. I am telling you now to buy this book!
Guest More than 1 year ago
Keep It Simple Stupid. A wonderful introduction to HTML. Concise, well illustrated, the only improvement might be if an educational movie/tutorial were made of it. -- J. Carter, M.Ed., Eugene, OR
Guest More than 1 year ago
If you are beginner in software and computer systems, here is book you must have to start with in HTML. It is the best book to understand the HTML, through fundamentals. I have no software background, yet I had easy time in understanding and developing my own web pages. Also this book leads to the essential links like Java applets / Javascript etc. I am thrilled with my progress and strongly recommend for any beginner in software. Advanced programmers keep away from this book !!!