Creationist Diet

Overview

What did God give to human beings for food? What does the Bible teach about diet and nutrition? How do the Biblical teachings on foods compare to scientific research on nutrition and degenerative disease like heart disease, cancer, and stroke? These and other questions are addressed in this book.

Starting with God's decrees about foods at Creation, the Fall, and after the Flood, and gleaning nutrition information from the rest of the Bible, this book proposes four different ...

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Overview

What did God give to human beings for food? What does the Bible teach about diet and nutrition? How do the Biblical teachings on foods compare to scientific research on nutrition and degenerative disease like heart disease, cancer, and stroke? These and other questions are addressed in this book.

Starting with God's decrees about foods at Creation, the Fall, and after the Flood, and gleaning nutrition information from the rest of the Bible, this book proposes four different possible Creationist Diets, presenting the pros and cons of each. These different possible diets are also correlated with scientific research. So information is given to the reader to decide on what type of diet would be best for you personally.

In addition, foods are divided into "God-given foods" and "not God-given foods." These lists are then compared to what foods scientific research has shown to increase or decrease the risk of heart disease, cancer, and stroke. So the reader can know what foods to include in your diet and what foods to avoid.

Osteoporosis and other health problems with dietary connections are also discussed, along with dietary supplements, exercise, and related issues. So this book covers a wide range of topics to help the reader begin to live a healthier lifestyle according to God's design.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781587218521
  • Publisher: AuthorHouse
  • Publication date: 9/20/2000
  • Pages: 236
  • Product dimensions: 5.00 (w) x 8.00 (h) x 0.54 (d)

Meet the Author

Gary F. Zeolla earned a BS in Nutrition Science from Penn State University (1983). He is the founder and director of Darkness to Light ministry.
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Read an Excerpt

A popular diet program being promoted today, especially on the Internet, is the "Paleolithic Diet." The idea of the diet is to eat like a "Paleo-man" i.e., a caveman. The theory behind the diet is that the healthiest way to eat is the way our ancestors ate from when we first evolved into Homo sapiens about two million years ago, until our diets changed a few thousand years ago. Such a diet would be how evolution "intended" us to eat.

Such a diet does have plausibility, if one believes in the theory of evolution. I for one do not. But this "Paleolithic Diet" got me thinking as to what a diet based on the theory of creation would look like.

Accepting the creation scenario as literally true has several implications that will bear on the question of diet. First off, all human beings are descendents of Adam and Eve. As such, any dietary directives God gave to Adam and Eve would apply to and have been passed on to all human beings. Furthermore, these were the only God-given dietary directives for human beings during the entire antediluvian (before the Flood) era.

Second, all human beings alive today are descendents of Noah and his family. So again, any dietary directives God gave to Noah would apply to and have been passed on to all human beings. However, it should be noted that any such dietary directives would have been given much later in human history than the ones given to Adam and Eve.

Third, the Tower of Babel is a turning point in human history. With the scattering of humans over the planet, and the division into races, no longer could dietary directives be given to the entire human race. Each people group would begin to develop their own, unique dietary habits.

The import of these three points is this: any dietary directives given to Adam and Eve would constitute the most "basic" or original diet for humans. Dietary directives given to Noah and his family would still be important for all peoples, but they would be later, less basic, and less original directives. And information about diet in the Bible after the time of the Tower of Babel would be even later, and even less basic, and in no sense original.

So the thesis of the Creationist Diet is that the earlier a dietary directive is given, the more basic and applicable it is to all peoples. Or to put it another way, the earlier a food entered into the human diet, the more likely it is that it is a healthy food for all peoples. Whereas, the later a food entered into the human diet, the less likely it is to be a healthy food for all people.

So with that background, this book will now try to ascertain from Scripture when different kinds of foods entered into the human diet. And most of all, this book will try to discern what are "God-given foods" based on dietary directives given in the Bible.

What this means is Genesis chapters 1-11 will receive the most emphasis in developing a Creationist Diet, which is appropriate as it is from these chapters that the creation theory is developed. However, since "All Scripture [is] God-breathed and [is] beneficial" (2Tim 3:16; ALT), other parts of Scripture will be taken into account at appropriate points.

In addition, throughout this book, numerous scientific studies will be cited which demonstrate science is finally catching up with the Biblical teachings on diet....

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Table of Contents

Preface
Introduction: Creation Theory
Chapter 1: Genesis 1-3 (Fruits, Nuts, Vegetables, and Seeds)
Chapter 2: Grains and Legumes
Chapter 3: Problems with Restrictive Diets
Chapter 4: Benefits of a Vegan Diet
Chapter 5: Pros and Cons of Flesh Foods
Chapter 6: Flesh Foods Restrictions
Chapter 7: Additional Animal Foods
Chapter 8: Milk Products and the Bible
Chapter 9: Arguments against Dairy Consumption
Chapter 10: Calcium and Osteoporosis
Chapter 11: Summary of Diets and God-given Foods
Chapter 12: Foods, Heart Disease, Cancer, and Stroke
Chapter 13: Low-fat vs. Low-carb
Chapter 14: Popular Diet Plans and Syndrome X
Chapter 15: Carbohydrate Intake and Exercise Performance
Chapter 16: Comparison with Other Diets
Chapter 17: Lifestyle Changes for Maintained Body Fat Loss
Chapter 18: Starting an Exercise Program
Chapter 19: More on Exercise
Chapter 20: Practical Tips
Chapter 21: Supplements: Part One
Chapter 22: Supplements: Part Two
Chapter 23: Personal Diet, Supplement, and Exercise Program
Appendix: About Darkness to Light
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