Creative Bible Lesson in 1 & 2 Timothy and Titus: 12 Sessions to Deepen Your Faith in a World of Oppression, Danger, and Difficulty

Creative Bible Lesson in 1 & 2 Timothy and Titus: 12 Sessions to Deepen Your Faith in a World of Oppression, Danger, and Difficulty

by Len Evans
     
 

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This newest installment of the bestselling Creative Bible Lessons series provides practical faith-sustaining principles for Christian teenagers from every walk of life. These “pastoral epistles,” written by the Apostle Paul at the end of his life, give sound instruction on how to lead the young church in a world of oppression, danger, and difficulty. In

Overview

This newest installment of the bestselling Creative Bible Lessons series provides practical faith-sustaining principles for Christian teenagers from every walk of life. These “pastoral epistles,” written by the Apostle Paul at the end of his life, give sound instruction on how to lead the young church in a world of oppression, danger, and difficulty. In twelve chapters this book covers leadership, worship, getting in shape, walking the talk, knowing your enemy, money, overcoming opposition, and the Bible.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780310255284
Publisher:
Zondervan
Publication date:
08/28/2004
Series:
Creative Bible LessonsSeries Series
Pages:
160
Sales rank:
1,130,690
Product dimensions:
8.50(w) x 11.00(h) x 0.38(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

Read an Excerpt

Creative Bible Lessons in 1 & 2 Timothy and Titus

session
THE BIG IDEA
paul's pastoral proteges
TALES OF TIMOTHY AND TITUS: FIRST-CENTURY TRUTHS FOR THE 21ST CENTURY
* Discover how the lives of Paul, Timothy, and Titus intertwine and affect each other.
* Evaluate their own spiritual heritage and plan their spiritual legacy.
1 CORINTHIANS 4:16-17
Both Timothy and Titus were pastors. They were very different from each other, yet God used both of them. God can also use you regardless of your background, gender, fi nancial status, age, or anything else. The truths Paul shared in his letters to these two men will help everyone who reads them.
WHAT'S A PASTORAL EPISTLE?
For around 200 years, 'Pastoral Epistle' has been used to describe the grouping of 1 Timothy,
2 Timothy, and Titus. These three books of the Bible go together like the fl avors in Neapolitan ice cream.
It is generally agreed that these books were written in this order---1 Timothy, Titus, and then 2 Timothy. The most likely scenario is that Paul was released from prison in Rome (as we last see him in Acts 28). After a few years of freedom, he was recaptured and fi nally killed in Rome. It's during these last three or four years of his life and ministry that Paul wrote the Pastoral Epistles. If 1 Timothy and Titus were written during the last leg of his race,
2 Timothy was written as he approached the fi nish line. It is often referred to as his 'last will and testament.'
Because they are so unlike the other Bible books Paul wrote---the vocabulary is very distinct, plus they were written to a person and not directly to a church (although they were to be used by the Church)---some scholars argue that he must not have written these three books. However, these contrasts simply indicate that these books were written for different purposes. We write a letter to a friend differently than we do a letter to our senator or a letter to the editor of the local paper. So it is with the Pastoral Epistles---they were written for the benefi t of the church where Timothy and Titus had been assigned to work, but they were also within God's plan for the entire body of believers that would come and be part of the Church.
DID YOU KNOW?
BACKGROUND CHECK
1 During this session students will---
8 Creative Bible Lessons in 1 & 2 Timothy and Titus
OPENING
Option 1: Great Partners
You'll need---
* Copies of Great Partners Matching Game (page 13), one for each pair of students
* Pen or pencil for each pair
* Candy bar prize for the winners
Ask students to pair off and then hand out copies of Great Partners Matching Game (page 13) and a pen or pencil to each twosome. Students should work together to complete the repro page; give them just two or three minutes to do so. Then go over the following answers with the group and award a candy bar prize to the team with the most correct answers: 1-R; 2-Q; 3-K; 4-N; 5-L; 6-T; 7-P; 8-J; 9-S; 10-B; 11-O; 12-A; 13-C; 14-F; 15-U; 16-G; 17-D;
18-M; 19-H; 20-I; 21-E.
Transition with something like this---
This was a fairly easy activity to do because all the partners on the list are not only well-known in their own right,
but they are also known for being together. When you think of Paul, you should also think of his various ministry partners: Silas, Barnabas, Timothy, and Titus. Timothy and Titus stand out among even his closest associates because
Paul wrote individual letters to each of them, which are included in our Bible. The books of 1 Timothy, 2 Timothy,
and Titus are a trilogy and are referred to as the Pastoral Epistles.
Option 2: What Do You Look for in FRIENDS?
You'll need---
* Copies of What Do You Look for in FRIENDS? (page 14), one for each student
* Pen or pencil for each student
This activity will help your students think about the characteristics they look for---or maybe should look for---in their friends, as well as the kind of friend they should be to others. Pass out the What Do You Look for in
FRIENDS? (page 14) and ask students to read the instructions before giving them fi ve to 10 minutes to write down their answers. (Encourage them to write two answers for each letter if they have the time.)
Afterward you can transition with something like this---
When you think of Paul, you should also think of his various ministry partners: Silas, Barnabas, Timothy, and Titus.
Timothy and Titus stand out among even his closest associates because Paul wrote individual letters to each of them,
which are included in our Bible. The books of 1 Timothy, 2 Timothy, and Titus are a trilogy and are referred to as the Pastoral Epistles.
READ IT IN GOD'S WORD
In order for students to fully appreciate the relationships these men shared with each other, use the 'Background
Check' section, in addition to the following information, to explain some of the behind-the-scenes facts that intertwine and affect the lives of Paul, Timothy, and Titus.
Jesus and Paul
* Jesus sent out 72 of his followers in groups of two to minister to people. Paul continued this tradition by having many people help him in ministry and life: Barnabas, Silas, Luke, Mark, Apollos, Epaphroditus, and Aquila. The
Paul's Pastoral Proteges 9
10 Creative Bible Lessons in 1 & 2 Timothy and Titus women included Priscilla, Lydia, Euodia, and Syntyche---and a lot of other women and men with names that are hard to pronounce.
* Jesus had his disciples, but of these 12 men, he had an inner circle of John, Peter, and James. And among these three, John had the closest relationship with Jesus---he calls himself 'the disciple Jesus loved.' Paul's inner circle would include Barnabas, Silas, Timothy, and Titus. But of them all, Timothy had the closest relationship with Paul.
Timothy and Titus
* We know very little about Titus. He was a Gentile believer who ministered and traveled with Paul (Galatians 2:1-3).
He served in the troubled church in Corinth (2 Corinthians 8:16-24). Titus is last mentioned as being in Dalmatia
(2 Timothy 4:10), or modern-day Yugoslavia, and tradition says he eventually returned to Crete and served there until his death.
* We don't know for certain, but it's reasonable to think of Timothy as being between the ages of 15 and 19 when he joined Paul in Acts 16. Therefore, he could have been around 30 or 34 years old when he was doing ministry in Ephesus.
ACTIVITY
INTERNSHIP IMAGINATION: BECOMING PROFESSIONAL IN YOUR PROFESSION
You'll need---
* Copies of Internship Imagination (page 15) for each student
* Pen or pencil for each student
Hand out the Internship Imagination page (page 15) and something to write with while you read the following instructions---
What do you want to be when you grow up? You've been asked that question throughout your life. Now imagine you get to choose someone---who is now either living or dead---to instruct you as to how to do the professions that are listed on this sheet. Who would you choose to be your instructor in each profession? Write down your answers.
When the activity is completed, ask students to break into smaller groups and explain to each other why they chose the person they did for their dream internship. Or ask a few students to share their responses with the entire group.
Then ask, What are the benefi ts and responsibilities of being mentored by someone great?

Meet the Author

Len Evans is youth pastor at Trinity Baptist Church in Fairfield, CT, and has been in full-time ministry since graduating from Dallas Theological Seminary in 1994. He's been a regular lesson contributor to Interlinc's Leaders Guide for five years, as well as a contributor to Youthworker Journal and presenting seminars at the Youth Specialties National Youth Workers Conventions.

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