Creative Conflict in African American Thought

Creative Conflict in African American Thought

by Wilson Jeremiah Moses
     
 

ISBN-10: 0521828260

ISBN-13: 9780521828260

Pub. Date: 02/29/2004

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

All active thought runs unavoidably into contradiction, and original thought is generated by the tragic and heroic struggle to reconcile conflict, says Moses (history, Pennsylvania State U.). Selecting complicated thinkers on the basis of their self-evident contradictions, he addresses varieties of contradiction represented in, but by no means peculiar to,

Overview

All active thought runs unavoidably into contradiction, and original thought is generated by the tragic and heroic struggle to reconcile conflict, says Moses (history, Pennsylvania State U.). Selecting complicated thinkers on the basis of their self-evident contradictions, he addresses varieties of contradiction represented in, but by no means peculiar to, African-American thought. His concern is not with a conflict between thought and action, but with the collision of ideas. Examples include Crummell's reverence for the English language while promoting the development of a Liberian culture, and Garvey's pacifism and his conception of God as a war lord. Annotation ©2005 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780521828260
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press
Publication date:
02/29/2004
Pages:
328
Product dimensions:
5.98(w) x 8.98(h) x 0.87(d)

Table of Contents

Part I. Introduction: Consistency … the Hobgoblin of Little Minds: 1. The meaning of struggle; Part II. Frederick Douglass: The Individualist as Race Man: 2. Where honor is due: Frederick Douglass and representative man; 3. Writing freely? Douglass's racialization, and desexualization; 4. Frederick Douglass, superstar; Part III. Alexander Crummell: the Anglophile as Afrocentrist: 5. Africa, Christianity, and civilization; 6. Crummell and the new south; 7. Crummell, Du Bois, and presentism; Part IV. Booker Taliafero Washington: The Idealist as Materialist: 8. Booker T. Washington and the meaning of progress; 9. Protestant ethic versus conspicuous consumption; Part V. Burghardt Du Bois: The Democrat as Authoritarian: 10. Du Bois on religion and art; 11. Du Bois and democracy: a tragic realism; 12. Du Bois protestant perfectionism and progressive pragmatism; Part VI. Marcus Moziah Garvey: The Realist as Romantic: 13. The birth of tragedy: Garvey's heroic struggles; 14. Becoming history: Garvey and the genius of his age; Part VII. Conclusion: Saving Heroes from their Admirers: 15. Reality, contradiction and the meaning of progress.

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