Creative Fidelity: American Catholic Intellectual Traditions

Overview

A treasury of primary documents illustrating how Catholics in the United States entered into the life of the new nation and matured as they interacted with the growing American traditions in intellectual life.
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Overview

A treasury of primary documents illustrating how Catholics in the United States entered into the life of the new nation and matured as they interacted with the growing American traditions in intellectual life.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

Table of Contents

Foreword
Acknowledgments
General Introduction
1 John Ireland's call to the intellectual life, November 10, 1889 5
2 John Lancaster Spalding's "Gesu sermon," 1900 6
3 George N. Shuster on Catholic letters in the United States, 1930 7
4 George Bull, S.J., on "research and the Catholic mind" 9
5 John Tracy Ellis on the dearth of Catholic intellectuals, 1955 10
6 Joseph Clifford Fenton responds to Ellis, 1956 14
7 Walter Ong, S.J., on Etienne Gilson and Jacques Maritain as symbols, 1957 15
8 Thomas F. O'Dea on the intellectual life as quest, 1958 16
9 John D. Donovan on anti-intellectualism in American Catholic life, 1964 17
10 Michael V. Gannon on Pascendi's intellectual impact, 1971 22
11 Paul Giles on the intellectual as non-conformist, 1992 23
12 Philip Gleason on the appearance of "cultural" Catholicism, 1995 25
13 John England on the consolations and limitations of philosophy, 1832 33
14 Isaac Hecker, CSP, "Catholicity and the tendencies of the age," 1887 36
15 James H. Ryan on the contributions of the New Scholasticism, 1926 40
16 Francis J. Connell and the moral applications of Neo-Thomism, 1959 43
17 Thomas Merton's intellectual conversion to Catholicism, 1948 46
18 Thomas Merton on St. Thomas and the failings of the Neo-Thomists, 1966 48
19 John Courtney Murray, S.J., "the doctrine lives : the eternal return of natural law," 1960 49
20 John Carroll and Catholic education, 1787-1800 58
20a John Carroll's plans for Georgetown Academy, 1787 58
20b A maneuver to secure the education of Catholic girls, 1792-1800 60
21 Gabriel Richard's petition to the territorial legislature of Michigan, 1808 62
22 Black Catholics of Philadelphia seek education for their children, 1817 64
23 Pontifical charter for St. Mary's Seminary, Baltimore, 1822 65
24 Sisters of the Visitation at Georgetown petition Congress for incorporation, 1828 67
25 Origins of St. Joseph Academy, Carondelet, Missouri, 1840 73
26 Archbishop Hughes versus the Public School Society, 1841 76
27 Orestes Brownson on Catholic colleges, 1858 80
28 Petition to Leo XIII for a Polish seminary in the United States, 1879 82
29 The Third Plenary Council of Baltimore on the Catholic education of youth, 1884 83
30 Preserving faith and culture : a Polish Catholic newspaper, 1891 90
31 Brothers of the Christian schools : teaching Latin in the United States, 1897 91
32 New methods for scripture studies in seminaries, 1900 98
33 Mother Katharine Drexel and Xavier University, 1924, 1930 102
34 Religious vacation schools in the diocese of Leavenworth, 1929 105
35 Teaching theology in Catholic colleges, 1939 108
36 Sister and at least forty-eight pupils, 1948 111
37 The education of Sisters, 1949 111
38 Religious of the Sacred Heart at Stanford and Berkeley, 1954 116
39 Are parochial schools the answer? 1964 117
40 Defining the contemporary Catholic university, 1967 120
41 An Indian Sister calls for cultural adaptation, 1972 124
42 Catechesis and renewal, 1977 127
43 A Catholic senator on government funding for private schools, 1980 129
44 The Catholic identity of colleges and universities, 1999 133
45 John Carroll on the Pope as spiritual head of the church, 1784 142
46 John England addresses Congress, 1826 142
47 Orestes Brownson on the political destiny of the United States, 1865 144
48 Isaac Hecker on the providential relationship between church and state in the United States, 1887 146
49 John Ireland on the church as the mother of liberty and the United States as a providential nation, 1905 148
50 Thomas Scott Preston invokes the syllabus, 1891 150
51 Michael Williams on the Scopes trial, 1925 152
52 John A. Ryan on union of church and state, 1928 153
53 Joseph Clifford Fenton defends the "thesis," 1950 155
54 John Courtney Murray on religious liberty and the distinction between church and state, 1960 156
55 Garry Wills on freedom, 1964 159
56 Francis Patrick Kenrick, "on slavery," 1841 167
57 John B. Hogan pleads for the practical in moral theology, 1898 170
58 John A. Ryan on usury and monopoly, 1919 171
59 Dorothy Day on nonviolence, 1936 173
60 John C. Ford, S.J. on "obliteration bombing," 1944 174
61 William F. Buckley, Jr., on Mater et Magistra, 1961 177
62 Dr. John Rock on "the Pill," 1963 178
63 Paul Hanly Furfey on "actor-centered" moral theology, 1966 179
64 Richard McCormick, S.J., on the preservation of life. 1974 182
65 Germain Grisez on personal vocation, 1983 184
66 Michael Novak on the limits of capitalism, 1993 186
67 J. Bryan Hehir on the thirtieth anniversary of Gaudium et Spes, 1996 188
68 On the mission and influence of Christian art, 1900 194
69 Gregorian chant as art : translating the liturgy into music, 1908 198
70 Literature as a moral activity, 1953 201
71 Flannery O'Connor on the prophetic vision of the fiction writer, 1969 204
72 The impact of the legion of decency on American film, 1951 206
73 A celebrated novelist examines the Catholic roots of her craft, 1998 209
74 A Notre Dame priest explores the possibility of "theistic evolution," 1896 223
75 The struggle against eugenics in the early twentieth century, 1926 228
76 The proper relationship between theology and science, 1950 232
77 Monsignor Fulton Sheen on the problem with modern psychology and psychoanalysis, 1949 235
78 Pierre Teilhard de Chardin, S.J. : reconceptualizing ceation, cosmology and Christology through the lens of evolution, 1964 238
79 "An ecological ethic grounded in truth" : feminism, environmentalism, and women's spirituality, 1993 242
80 The founding of the Catholic Biblical Quarterly, 1939 256
81 Joseph C. Fenton on defining "religious freedom," 1944 259
82 John Courtney Murray, S.J., on "the religion of the state," 1949 262
83 The problems with the "new theology," 1950 267
84 The social implications embodied in the liturgy, 1951 271
85 John LaFarge, S.J., on race relations, 1956 273
86 Walter Ong, S.J., on history and the Catholic mind, 1957 277
87 Gustave Weigel, S.J., on the promise of ecumenism, 1960 279
87a How the Catholic church views herself, 1961 280
87b How, then, may we proceed with ecumenical dialogue? 1960 282
88 Avery Dulles, S.J., on the council's teaching on "the church and the world," 1967 295
89 Mary Daly and the birth of radical Catholic feminism, 1968 299
90 Humanae Vitae and the rise of public theological dissent, 1968-69 302
91 Against the radical Catholics, 1971 306
92 The real gains in ecumenical dialogue, 1974 309
93 David Tracy on rethinking theology within the context of pluralism, 1981 312
94 The incomplete progress toward ecumenism, 1988 315
95 Andrew Sullivan on Catholicism and homosexuality, 1997 317
Index 321
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