Creative Jazz Improvisation / Edition 4

Other Format (Print)
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $85.87
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 21%)
Other sellers (Other Format)
  • All (10) from $85.87   
  • New (7) from $85.87   
  • Used (3) from $88.83   

Overview

This well-organized book combines all of the techniques that jazz musicians practice into a comprehensive whole. It covers practice patterns and scales in all keys and tempos, transcribing solos of master improvisers, learning the jazz repertoire, and playing with other musicians. Chapter topics include how to practice, creatively improvise, and teach improvisation; major innovators; important contributors; women in jazz; chord substitutions; scales; and form. Each chapter also contains theory and ear exercises. Applicable to any instrument–or a classroom of varied instruments–this book is for jazz students and professionals at all levels of proficiency.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Booknews
Detailed information for students and professionals on how to practice, how to improvise in a creative way, and how to teach jazz improvisation. Discusses the creative process and techniques for accessing creative spontaneity, explains the basics of improvisation, and provides technical exercises, scales, and patterns to help develop facility and ear skills. The material can be applied to any instrument. Spiral-bound. No index. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780131776395
  • Publisher: Pearson
  • Publication date: 7/14/2006
  • Format: Spiral Bound
  • Edition description: REV
  • Edition number: 4
  • Pages: 320
  • Product dimensions: 9.00 (w) x 10.70 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Read an Excerpt

PREFACE:

Preface

It is gratifying that, since the publication of the first edition in 1989 and the second in 1995, many college educators, private instructors, and students of jazz have found Creative Jazz Improvisation to be a valuable aid in their musical growth. This text is a direct outgrowth of over twenty-one years of experiences teaching jazz improvisation at the college level, as well as my own personal quest to develop as a jazz artist.

I believe there is a direct parallel between life and art. The pursuit of understanding in any art form can teach us much about ourselves and serve as a catalyst for a lifetime of learning. My own musical perspectives have evolved since the second edition of this text was written, and much of this new information has been incorporated into the present volume. Therefore, I believe this edition to be much more than a minor reworking of the previous one. However, all of the same features that made Creative Jazz Improvisation a popular choice for classroom use are retained, including:

  1. The philosophy that there are several paths to the same goal and that each student learns in his or her own unique way.
  2. An orientation in difficulty toward college-level and intermediate-to-advanced musicians. For students at the high-school or community college level or adult beginners, I strongly recommend the entry-level companion to this text, Creative Beginnings, which comes with a play-along compact disc.
  3. The division of the majority of chapters into sections devoted to jazz theory, exercises over a specified chord progression, a list of relevant compositions, and a transcribedsolo which has been transposed and edited for concert pitch treble clef, B6, E6 and bass clef instruments.
  4. A thorough discussion of all facets of jazz theory, including major scale modes, forms and chord substitutions, melodic minor modes, diminished and whole-tone scales, pentatonic scales, and intervallic and "free" improvisation.
  5. The keying of the chord progressions to either the widespread Jamey Aebersold series or the compact disc accompanying Creative Beginnings.
  6. Exercises that include not only basic scales and arpeggios but also melodic ideas taken directly from cited recordings by master improvisers, arranged in order of relative difficulty.
  7. The indexing of the list of compositions to legal fake-books, particularly the New Real Book and the Aebersold play-along series.
  8. The correlation of half of the transcribed solos with the widely available anthology, The Smithsonian Collection of Classic Jazz.
  9. The convenience of allowing a classroom of mixed instrumentation to work simultaneously from the text.

Differences between the second and third editions include:

  1. The addition of a new chapter, "Whom to Listen To," which lists major innovators, important contributors, and women in jazz.
  2. The expansion of the chapter on "Rhythm," with considerable new information and exercises.
  3. Replacement of two transcriptions with more readily playable examples, including Miles Davis's "Solea" solo (in place of Wayne Shorter's "Masqualero" solo), and Bill Evans's "Autumn Leaves" solo (in lieu of Dizzy Gillespie's "Stardust" solo). In addition, J. J. Johnson's solo on "Aquarius" has been renotated in long meter to make it easier to read.
  4. An expansion of the list of compositions in each chapter to reflect the ever-increasing number of play-along recordings by Jamey Aebersold. The third edition is now keyed to the first eighty-five volumes in his series, A New Approach to Jazz Improvisation.
  5. An extensive reworking of all portions of the text to improve readability and reflect recent information.
  6. A reappraisal of all exercises, with selected replacements and additions.
  7. The incorporation of inspirational epigraphs at the beginning of each chapter.
  8. A continued investigation of the how to bridge the gap between the technical and intellectual aspects of jazz with the creative and intuitive state of mind. Many of these ideas may be traced to my exposure to the concepts of pianist Kenny Werner, and I am indebted to his willingness to allow me to incorporate some of his ideas into this volume.

This text reflects the influences of my previous teachers, particularly David Baker, Woody Shaw, and Kenny Werner, the many jazz artists whose work I have studied and transcribed, and the pedagogical concepts of Jamey Aebersold. I gratefully acknowledge these people, as well as the staff at Prentice Hall, particularly my acquisitions editor, Christopher Johnson and my production and copy editor, Laura Lawrie. I sincerely hope the readers of this text will find it a valuable aid in their growth as musicians.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Contents

Preface

PART 1: THE ART OF IMPROVISATION

Chapter 1: Practicing Jazz, Constructing Solos, Playing with Other Musicians, Creative Improvisation, Performance Anxiety, and Teaching Jazz

Practicing Jazz

Constructing Solos and Playing with Other Musicians

Creative Improvisation and Kenny Werner’s “Effortless Mastery”

Performance Anxiety

How to Teach Jazz Improvisation

Chapter 2: Essential Listening: Major Innovators, Important Contributors, and Women in Jazz

Major Innovators Who Changed the Direction of Jazz

Important Jazz Contributors

Women In Jazz

Chapter 3: Rhythm

Gaining Facility with Rhythm

Listening to Rhythms in Jazz Compositions

Max Roach’s Improvised Solo on “Blue Seven”

PART 2: DIATONIC CHORDS AND THE MODES IN THE MAJOR SCALE

Chapter 4: Major Scales and Major 7th Chords

Theory/Ear Exercises

Gaining Facility with Major Scales and Major 7th Chords

Improvising on Jazz Compositions Based on Major 7th Chords

Louis Armstrong’s Improvised Solo on “Hotter Than That”

Chapter 5: Mixolydian and Bebop 7th Scales, and Dominant 7th Chords

Theory/Ear Exercises

Gaining Facility with Mixolydian and Bebop 7th Scales, and Dominant 7th Chords

Improvising on Jazz Compositions Based on Dominant 7th Chords

Lester Young’s Improvised Solo on “Lester Leaps In”

Chapter 6: Dorian Scales and Minor 7th Chords

Theory/Ear Exercises

Gaining Facility with Dorian Scales and Minor 7th Chords

Improvising on Jazz Compositions Based on Minor 7th Chords

Miles Davis’s Improvised Solo on “So What”

Chapter 7: The ii—V—I Progression

Theory/Ear Exercises

Gaining Facility with ii—V—I Progressions

Improvising on Jazz Compositions Based on ii—V or ii—V—I Progressions

Clifford Brown’s Improvised Solo on “Pent-Up House”

Chapter 8: Locrian and Aeolian Scales, and Minor ii7—V7—i Progressions

Theory/Ear Exercises

Gaining Facility with Minor ii7—V7—i Progressions

Improvising on Jazz Compositions Based on ii7—V7b9—i

Progressions

Milt Jackson’s Improvised Solo on “Django”

Chapter 9: Lydian and Phrygian Scales, Major 7th b5 Chords

Theory/Ear Exercises

Gaining Facility with Lydian and Phrygian Scales

Improvising on Jazz Compositions Based on Major 7b5 Chords and Lydian Scales, or i—bii Progressions and Phrygian Scales

Miles Davis’s Improvised Solo on “Solea”

PART 3: CHORD SUBSTITUTIONS, HARMONIC STRUCTURES, AND FORMS

Chapter 10: The Blues Scale, the Blues Form, and Chord Substitutions

The Blues Form

The Blues Scale

Chord Substitutions

Theory/Ear Exercises

Gaining Facility with the Basic Blues Progression

Gaining Facility with Blues Substitutions

Improvising on Jazz Compositions Based on the Blues Form

Charlie Parker’s Improvised Solo on “Now’s the Time”

Chapter 11: Sectional Forms and Rhythm Changes

Theory/Ear Exercises

Gaining Facility with Rhythm Changes

Improvising on Jazz Compositions Based on “Rhythm Changes” and Through-Composed Forms

Charlie Parker’s Improvised Solo on “Shaw ’Nuff”

Chapter 12: Harmonic Structures and Coltrane Substitutions

Coltrane Substitutions

Theory/Ear Exercises

Gaining Facility with Coltrane Substitutions

Improvising on Jazz Compositions Based on Coltrane Substitutions

John Coltrane’s Improvised Solo on “Giant Steps”

Chapter 13: Free Forms

Gaining Facility with Free Improvisation

Improvising on Jazz Compositions Based on Free Forms

Ornette Coleman’s Improvised Solo on “Congeniality”

PART 4: ALTERED CHORDS, DIMINISHED MODES, WHOLE-TONE AND HARMONIC MINOR SCALES, AND MELODIC MINOR MODES

Chapter 14: Diminished Scales, Diminished and Altered Dominant 7th Chords

Theory/Ear Exercises

Gaining Facility with Diminished Scales

Improvising on Jazz Compositions Based on Altered Dominant or Fully-Diminished Chords

J. J. Johnson’s Improvised Solo on “Aquarius”

Chapter 15: Whole-Tone Scales and Augmented Chords

Theory/Ear Exercises

Gaining Facility with Whole-Tone Scales

Improvising on Jazz Compositions Based on Dominant 9 s5 Chords or Whole-Tone Scales

Thelonious Monk’s Improvised Solo on “Evidence”

Chapter 16: Harmonic and Melodic Minor Scales, Minor (Major 7th) Chords

Theory/Ear Exercises

Gaining Facility with Melodic Minor Scales and Minor (Major 7th) Chords

Improvising on Jazz Compositions Based on Minor (Major 7th) Chords

Sonny Rollins’s Improvised Solo on “Airegin”

Chapter 17: Locrian s2 and Altered Scales, and Minor iiH7—V7—i Progressions

Theory/Ear Exercises

Gaining Facility with Minor iiH7—V7—i Progressions

Improvising on Jazz Compositions Based on Half-Diminished 7th and Altered Dominant Chords

Bill Evans’s Improvised Solo on “The Autumn Leaves”

Chapter 18: Lydian Augmented and Lydian Dominant Scales, and Major 7th s5 and Dominant 9th s11 Chords

Theory/Ear Exercises

Gaining Facility with Lydian Augmented and Lydian Dominant Scales and Major 7th s5 and Dominant 9th s11 Chords

Improvising on Jazz Compositions Based on Dominant 9th s11 or Major 7th s5 Chords

Sonny Rollins’s Improvised Solo on “Blue Seven”

PART 5: PENTATONIC SCALES AND INTERVALLIC IMPROVISATION

Chapter19: Pentatonic Scales

Theory/Ear Exercises

Gaining Facility with Major Pentatonic Scales

Gaining Facility with Minor and Dominant Pentatonic Scales

Improvising on Jazz Compositions Using Pentatonic Scales

Woody Shaw’s Improvised Solo on “Child’s Dance”

Chapter 20: Four-Note Groupings Derived from Pentatonic Scales

Gaining Facility with Four-Note Groupings

Improvising on Jazz Compositions Using Four-Note Groupings

Chick Corea’s Improvised Solo on “Matrix”

Chapter 21: Intervallic Improvisation

Gaining Facility with Intervallic Improvisation

Improvising on Jazz Compositions Using Chromatic Intervals

Miles Davis’s Improvised Solo on “Petits Machins”

Appendix

I. Intervals

II. Modes in the Major Scale

III. Modes in the Melodic Minor Scale

IV. Diatonic 7th Chords in Major Keys

V. Diatonic 7th Chords in Minor Keys

VI. Chords and Their Relationship to Scales

VII. Upper Structure or “Slash” Chords

VIII. Resource List

Index

Read More Show Less

Preface

PREFACE:

Preface

It is gratifying that, since the publication of the first edition in 1989 and the second in 1995, many college educators, private instructors, and students of jazz have found Creative Jazz Improvisation to be a valuable aid in their musical growth. This text is a direct outgrowth of over twenty-one years of experiences teaching jazz improvisation at the college level, as well as my own personal quest to develop as a jazz artist.

I believe there is a direct parallel between life and art. The pursuit of understanding in any art form can teach us much about ourselves and serve as a catalyst for a lifetime of learning. My own musical perspectives have evolved since the second edition of this text was written, and much of this new information has been incorporated into the present volume. Therefore, I believe this edition to be much more than a minor reworking of the previous one. However, all of the same features that made Creative Jazz Improvisation a popular choice for classroom use are retained, including:

  1. The philosophy that there are several paths to the same goal and that each student learns in his or her own unique way.
  2. An orientation in difficulty toward college-level and intermediate-to-advanced musicians. For students at the high-school or community college level or adult beginners, I strongly recommend the entry-level companion to this text, Creative Beginnings, which comes with a play-along compact disc.
  3. The division of the majority of chapters into sections devoted to jazz theory, exercises over a specified chord progression, a list of relevant compositions, and atranscribedsolo which has been transposed and edited for concert pitch treble clef, B6, E6 and bass clef instruments.
  4. A thorough discussion of all facets of jazz theory, including major scale modes, forms and chord substitutions, melodic minor modes, diminished and whole-tone scales, pentatonic scales, and intervallic and "free" improvisation.
  5. The keying of the chord progressions to either the widespread Jamey Aebersold series or the compact disc accompanying Creative Beginnings.
  6. Exercises that include not only basic scales and arpeggios but also melodic ideas taken directly from cited recordings by master improvisers, arranged in order of relative difficulty.
  7. The indexing of the list of compositions to legal fake-books, particularly the New Real Book and the Aebersold play-along series.
  8. The correlation of half of the transcribed solos with the widely available anthology, The Smithsonian Collection of Classic Jazz.
  9. The convenience of allowing a classroom of mixed instrumentation to work simultaneously from the text.

Differences between the second and third editions include:

  1. The addition of a new chapter, "Whom to Listen To," which lists major innovators, important contributors, and women in jazz.
  2. The expansion of the chapter on "Rhythm," with considerable new information and exercises.
  3. Replacement of two transcriptions with more readily playable examples, including Miles Davis's "Solea" solo (in place of Wayne Shorter's "Masqualero" solo), and Bill Evans's "Autumn Leaves" solo (in lieu of Dizzy Gillespie's "Stardust" solo). In addition, J. J. Johnson's solo on "Aquarius" has been renotated in long meter to make it easier to read.
  4. An expansion of the list of compositions in each chapter to reflect the ever-increasing number of play-along recordings by Jamey Aebersold. The third edition is now keyed to the first eighty-five volumes in his series, A New Approach to Jazz Improvisation.
  5. An extensive reworking of all portions of the text to improve readability and reflect recent information.
  6. A reappraisal of all exercises, with selected replacements and additions.
  7. The incorporation of inspirational epigraphs at the beginning of each chapter.
  8. A continued investigation of the how to bridge the gap between the technical and intellectual aspects of jazz with the creative and intuitive state of mind. Many of these ideas may be traced to my exposure to the concepts of pianist Kenny Werner, and I am indebted to his willingness to allow me to incorporate some of his ideas into this volume.

This text reflects the influences of my previous teachers, particularly David Baker, Woody Shaw, and Kenny Werner, the many jazz artists whose work I have studied and transcribed, and the pedagogical concepts of Jamey Aebersold. I gratefully acknowledge these people, as well as the staff at Prentice Hall, particularly my acquisitions editor, Christopher Johnson and my production and copy editor, Laura Lawrie. I sincerely hope the readers of this text will find it a valuable aid in their growth as musicians.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)