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Creativity and Taoism
     

Creativity and Taoism

4.0 1
by Chung-yuan Chang
 

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'In Creativity and Taoism, Chang Chung-yuan makes the elusive principle of Tao available to the western mind with objectivity, warmth, and depth of insight. It is an important contribution to the task of making the Taoist wisdom accessible to the western intellect'

- Ira Progoff

'No one can read Chang's book without experiencing a broadening of his mental

Overview

'In Creativity and Taoism, Chang Chung-yuan makes the elusive principle of Tao available to the western mind with objectivity, warmth, and depth of insight. It is an important contribution to the task of making the Taoist wisdom accessible to the western intellect'

- Ira Progoff

'No one can read Chang's book without experiencing a broadening of his mental horizons'

- John C. H. Wu, Philosophy East and West

'His interpretation of the Taoist roots of Ch'an has been presented with taste and learning that help to clear up many questions that must have occurred to anyone familiar with his subject. "The Spirit of the Valley" dwells in this quiet and gentle man who, as so rarely happens, actually embodies some of the philosophic traits of which he writes'

- Gerald Sykes

'If the end of reading is the enhancement of life, the enlargement of experience and understanding, then this book becomes an important step in that direction. Dr. Chang writes in a style both lucid and felicitous. He displays with becoming modesty a mastery of the field, its development and its ideas... There is hardly a page which does not give pleasure'

- Robert R. Kirsh, Los Angeles Times

'Professor Chang's study, a brilliant exposition and analysis, is concerned with the relevance and applicability of the Taoist view in Chinese artistic and intellectual creativity. Few other works facilitate so sensitive an understanding of creative impulse and expression in Chinese culture'

- Hyman Kublin, Library Journal

Simultaneously accessible and scholarly, this classic book considers the underlying philosophy and the aesthetics of Chinese art and poetry, the expression of the Taoist approach to existence. Chapters cover everything from the potential of creativity to the way tranquillity is reflected in Chinese poems and painting. Chung-yuan Chang's deceptively simple and always lucid narrative explores the relationship between the Tao and the creative arts, introducing classic paintings and poems to bring Taoism to life.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781848190504
Publisher:
Kingsley, Jessica Publishers
Publication date:
02/15/2011
Pages:
272
Product dimensions:
5.40(w) x 8.40(h) x 0.70(d)

Meet the Author

Chung-yuan Chang was Professor of Philosophy at the University of Hawaii at Manoa. He died in 1988, aged 84.

Chung-yuan Chang was Professor of Philosophy at the University of Hawaii at Manoa. He died in 1988, aged 84.

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Creativity and Taoism 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Carl_in_Richland More than 1 year ago
I first learned of ‘Creativity and Taoism’ in Raymond Smullyan excellent book, ‘The Tao is Silent’ which includes a wonderful annotated bibliography. But unlike this lucid and frequently whimsical book on Taoism, ‘Creativity and Taoism’ is a quite serious, scholarly work that will be tough going for readers not used to working through philosophical arguments or rigorous critiques of poetry and art. The basic thesis, as far as I could tell, was that philosophical Taoism believes there is an inner voice within each of us that is easily masked by the chatter of society and its rules. Although this voice comes from within, it reflects the working of the universe. Hence it is that part of the universe that is within us. If the artist (poet or painter) can sense this voice, which often speaks without words, and if this artist has developed the needed technical skills (e.g., the different brush strokes used in traditional Chinese painting or the use of imagery and symbolism in poems), then truly great art will result. By great art is meant art that transcends the rules and boundaries of any one society or set of values. If this sounds a little esoteric, well, perhaps it is. But the many examples given to support this concept makes one think there is something real here. At least I did, and was glad that I struggled through this tough going book. Chapter 5 was, for me, the most interesting dealing as it did with poetry (my own personal interest). Persons with an interest in painting or calligraphy may fine Chapter 6 more intriguing. Unfortunately, for these last two chapters to be appreciated requires careful study of the preceding 4 chapters which develop the key philosophical ideas of Taoism needed as background for these final works. Persons new to Taoism might start with Benjamin Hoff’s ‘Tao of Pooh’, then move on to Smullyan’s ‘The Tao is Silent’, and then get into Chung-yuan Chang’s ‘Creativity and Taoism. This would not be a particularly difficult ‘way’ to follow and high returns would be likely.