The Creed of Violence

The Creed of Violence

4.6 6
by Boston Teran
     
 

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Mexico, 1910. The landscape pulses with the force of the upcoming revolution, an atmosphere rich in opportunity for a criminal such as Rawbone. His fortune arrives across the haze of the Sierra Blanca in the form of a truck loaded with weapons, an easy sell to those financing a bloodletting.

But Rawbone’s plan spins against him, and he soon finds himself… See more details below

Overview

Mexico, 1910. The landscape pulses with the force of the upcoming revolution, an atmosphere rich in opportunity for a criminal such as Rawbone. His fortune arrives across the haze of the Sierra Blanca in the form of a truck loaded with weapons, an easy sell to those financing a bloodletting.

But Rawbone’s plan spins against him, and he soon finds himself at the Mexican-American border and in the hands of the Bureau of Investigation. He is offered a chance for immunity, but only if he agrees to proceed with his scheme to deliver the truck and its goods to the Mexican oil fields while under the command of Agent John Lourdes. Rawbone sees no other option and agrees to the deal—but he fails to recognize the true identity of Agent Lourdes, a man from deep within his past.

As they work to expose the criminal network at the core of the revolution, it is clear their journey into the tarred desert is a push toward a certain ruin, and the history lurking between the criminal and agent may seal their fates.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Teran's cinematic fifth novel portrays the 1910 Mexican revolution via the gun sights of an unlikely duo: Rawbone, a hardened smalltime assassin, and John Lourdes, a Bureau of Investigation agent. The two are thrown together when Rawbone is caught smuggling munitions from Texas into Mexico and Rawbone's lawyer arranges a deal: immunity in exchange for Rawbone sharing his criminal intel. A bargain is struck, with Lourdes assigned to accompany Rawbone into the Mexican underground. The twist: Lourdes, unknown to everyone but himself, is Rawbone's son. As the two men make their way through a snake's nest of smugglers, thugs and professional killers, Lourdes must suppress the angst he feels toward his father and focus on surviving another day. While this bit of dramatic irony quickly wears thin, father and son share a sharp wit, cunning instinct and thirst for adventure that make this spy mission the very definition of a thrill. Teran's fast-paced prose reads like it was written for the big screen (Universal scooped up the film rights), and even if the moralizing about U.S. foreign intervention gets heavy-handed, this remains an intelligent page-turner. (Nov.)
Kirkus Reviews
Father and son do that Oedipal thing in turbulent 1910 Mexico. Revolution is brewing, and (predictably) predators of every description smell opportunity in the looming unrest. Among these is a slick, steely-eyed unregenerate who calls himself Rawbone. He has adopted a creed he refers to as "the practical application of strategy," an operational philosophy that enables scoundrels to steal and kill with amoral impunity. Rawbone applies it unstintingly though not flawlessly. Having successfully hijacked a truck loaded with guns and ammunition headed for interested parties in Mexico, he suddenly finds himself in the hands of the newly formed Bureau of Investigation. If Rawbone will cooperate in a sting aimed at certain big-time robber barons, he'll earn blanket immunity for a lifetime of villainy. If not, it's the slammer. He chooses the sting, of course. Going along with him as a minder-no sensible law-enforcement chief would permit Rawbone any more free rein than absolutely necessary-is a smart, tough young agent named John Lourdes, no straighter an arrow than his charge. Lourdes isn't his real name, nor for that matter is Rawbone a real name, nor are the men new to each other, though only one of them is aware of the complex history they share. From the very outset of their dangerous mission, the two find reasons to dislike each other, dislike that grows into mutual detestation. But danger prolonged can be its own kind of crucible, transformative and finally redemptive. As always, Teran's prose (The Prince of Deadly Weapons, 2002, etc.) has an unfortunate way of turning purple, but the man can flat out spin a yarn.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781582439488
Publisher:
Counterpoint Press
Publication date:
09/29/2009
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
320
Sales rank:
657,080
File size:
0 MB

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