Creole Flavors: Recipes for Marinades, Rubs, Sauces, and Spices

Creole Flavors: Recipes for Marinades, Rubs, Sauces, and Spices

by Kevin Graham
     
 

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Captures the vibrant tastes of the cuisine of southern Louisiana in 70 delicious recipes. Presents recipes for such Creole staples as homemade Hot Pepper Sauce, Creole Mustard, & Creole Cocktail Sauce. In addition to condiments & sauces, the book includes recipes for classic Creole dishes such as Jambalaya, Seafood Gumbo, Red Beans & Rice, & Pralines. He rounds out… See more details below

Overview

Captures the vibrant tastes of the cuisine of southern Louisiana in 70 delicious recipes. Presents recipes for such Creole staples as homemade Hot Pepper Sauce, Creole Mustard, & Creole Cocktail Sauce. In addition to condiments & sauces, the book includes recipes for classic Creole dishes such as Jambalaya, Seafood Gumbo, Red Beans & Rice, & Pralines. He rounds out this collection with basics like Homemade Sweet Butter, Creole Tomato Ketchup, & a variety of flavored oils & vinegars. He offers a fat-free variation on the traditional recipe for roux. Also features 25 gorgeous photos which evoke the mood & flavors of New Orleans.

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
Graham (Grains, Rice, and Beans, LJ 3/15/95) is a longtime New Orleans restaurant chef. In this attractive book, the third in Artisan's "Pantry Cookbook" series, he offers recipes for all sorts of Creole (not to be confused with Cajun) seasonings, condiments, sauces, oils and vinegars, and more, often accompanied by recipes for dishes that incorporate them. Sometimes the term Creole seems to be interpreted rather loosely (is Basil-Pesto Oil really part of this cuisine?), but the recipes are good, and imaginative cooks will find lots of uses for Graham's pantry items. Recommended. Sahni, author of the authoritative Classic Indian Cooking (LJ 10/15/80) and Classic Indian Vegetarian and Grain Cooking (LJ 11/15/85), does not limit herself to one cuisine in her latest work. Recipes inspired by Asian, Latin American, and African dishes showcase both familiar and exotic herbs and spices and combinations thereof. An informative introduction to everyday and uncommon spices and herbs is followed by 20 recipes for spice and herb blends and seasonings, each with another recipe using it, such as Grilled Squab with Fragrant Spice Rub and Lobster Sandwich with Curry Mayonnaise. Then there are dozens of delicious recipes arranged by category, including vegetarian meals and spicy condiments, with menu suggestions, e.g., Iced Pear Soup with Mint, Polenta with Green Peppercorns, and Chicken Braised in Cardamom Sauce. Unusual and wide-ranging, this is highly recommended.
Barbara Jacobs
Intermixed with more than 70 recipes that scream "N'Awlins," from gumbo to pickled watermelon rind, are such unusual delicacies as rum-dried grapes, spiced honey, and pickled green beans with fennel seeds. Even rarer--and definitely welcome--are the snippets of professional advice; for instance, the crawfish oil recipe elicits a debate on chopping up living crustaceans or tossing them live and whole into the oil. The recipe for homemade sweet butter was included because Graham thinks "we've forgotten the true taste of butter, being accustomed as we are to the packaged variety, with its antioxidants, stabilizers, heavy salt, and such."

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780788163371
Publisher:
DIANE Publishing Company
Publication date:
07/28/1999
Pages:
143

Meet the Author


Kevin Graham, named best chef in New Orleans in a 1995 poll of the city's chefs, has been cooking professionally for 30 years and is chef/owner of Sapphire's, located near the French Quarter in New Orleans. During his tenure as executive chef of New Orleans's five-star Windsor Court Hotel (from 1988 to 1994) the restaurant was named one of the three best restaurants in the country by Conde Nast Traveler. He is the author of The Cuisine of the Windsor Court (1991), Kevin Graham's Fish & Seafood Cookbook (1993), which was nominated for a James Beard award, Creole Flavors: Recipes for Marinades, Rubs, Sauces, and Spices (1996), and Grains, Rice and Beans (1998).

Zeva Oelbaum is a New York-based still life and food photographer. Her work can frequently be seen in The New York Times Magazine, House Beautiful, and many other magazines and books.

Read an Excerpt


The rituals people in Louisiana go through to get their cocktail lsauce just right never cease to amaze me. It seems everyone likes to blend cocktail sauce precisely to his or her own taste, adding a bit more hot sauce and a touch less horseradish or ketchup than the next person. Or they may add freshly squeezed lemon juice. Whatever your taste, blend your cocktail sauce to your liking and serve it with fresh seafood, especially raw or fried oysters or boiled shrimp.

3 cups Creole Tomato Ketchup (page 61) or store-bought ketchup

1/4 cup prepared horseradish sauce

Dash Worcestershire sauce

Dash Hot Pepper Sauce (page 50)

Combine all of the ingredients in a mixing bowl, stirring well to mix. Serve with seafood or refrigerate in an airtight container until ready to use. This sauce will keep for 1 month in the refrigerator.

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