Crescent Dawn (Dirk Pitt Series #21)

Crescent Dawn (Dirk Pitt Series #21)

3.9 561
by Clive Cussler, Dirk Cussler
     
 

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A priceless treasure recovered. A powerful empire resurrected. Dirk Pitt is on the move.

Overview

A priceless treasure recovered. A powerful empire resurrected. Dirk Pitt is on the move.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Arctic Drift has exotic locations, ruthless villains, and many narrow escapes and derring-do by Dirk Pitt, oceanography's answer to Indiana Jones. Cussler's fans come for swashbuckling [and] he delivers."
-Associated Press
Publishers Weekly
In the bloated fourth Dirk Pitt novel from Cussler and son Dirk (after Arctic Drift), evildoers Ozden Aktan Celik and Ozden's sister, Maria, who are bent on Muslim domination of the Middle East, plot to blow up sacred Muslim sites like Jerusalem's Dome of the Rock and pin the blame on the CIA in particular and the West in general. Dirk, the director of the National Underwater and Marine Agency, and the Celiks are both searching for lost religious artifacts related to Jesus, artifacts whose rediscovery could embarrass certain powerful members of the British establishment. The authors keep the action moving with plenty of wreck diving, running sea battles, and ships laden with explosives. Fans of the indefatigable Pitt will enjoy watching their hero as he joins the battle on land, in the air, and at sea, but others might wish the Cusslers had picked less familiar terrorist targets. (Nov.)
Library Journal
The Cussler family's latest Dirk Pitt adventure (after Arctic Drift) finds the head of the National Underwater and Marine Agency (NUMA) with his wife on vacation in Turkey. While visiting a friend at a museum, they stumble onto a major theft of priceless Roman artifacts connected to a sunken ship in the Mediterranean. Things turn personal for Pitt when his wife is kidnapped. His children also get caught in the sinister plot to restore the Ottoman Empire when artifacts they uncover in Israel and Turkey lead to a mysterious "manifest." Many people over the centuries have died to protect the sacred items listed in this document, and the Pitts will have to use their skills to stop the fundamentalist threat and survive. VERDICT The adventure thrillers featuring Dirk Pitt have been hit-and-miss since Clive's son took over the franchise, but this new entry defies expectations and is arguably the best of the Dirk Cussler novels. Cussler fans will be thrilled to see their favorite hero back in his prime. [See Prepub Alert, LJ 6/1/10.—Ed.]—Jeff Ayers, Seattle P.L.
Kirkus Reviews

Mix terrorists, Roman artifacts, delusions of dynasty and irrefutable physical evidence that Jesus of Nazareth lived, then add water—from the Mediterranean Sea—and you get another aquatic adventure starring Dirk Pitt and his colleagues at NUMA.

This is Cussler's 21st effort with Pitt and the National Underwater and Marine Agency (Arctic Drift, 2008, etc.). While studying algae blooms in the Aegean Sea, the intrepid explorer stumbles upon an Ottoman Empire era shipwreck, among which there are Roman artifacts. Pitt takes his find to his friend Dr. Rey Ruppé at the Istanbul Archeology Museum hoping to discover why a medieval ship would have been carrying Roman-Christian era cargo, and the nonstop action begins. There is a cast of familiar characters, including Al Giordino, Pitt's twin children, Summer and Dirk Jr., all complemented by a crew of memorable villains, including Ozden Celik and his sister, Maria, the last direct descendants of the Ottoman dynasty. That pair is in possession of black-market HMX explosives and are intent on starting a revolution. Readers also meet assorted allied Arab terrorists, traders in purloined antiquities and a too-easily-forgiven rogue archeologist named Ridley Bannister. The 100 chapters sail by rapidly when Cussler brings in the legendary Lord Kitchener, drowned in 1916 when the British warship HMS Hampshire sinks while on a mission to Russia, Helena, the mother Emperor Constantine, a nearly perfectly preserved Roman galley in a cave on Cyprus, and a letter from Jesus to Peter. The complicated plot has the most nefarious villains dead by chapter 84. Dirk Pitt fans will be happy to note the appearance of the obligatory auto, this time a 1948 Model 135 Delahaye convertible coupe with a Henri Chapron coachwork-body.

Cussler, writing with his son, once again blends history, technical knowledge, bombs, bullets and betrayal into cinematic action.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780425242391
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
10/25/2011
Series:
Dirk Pitt Series, #21
Pages:
640
Sales rank:
138,937
Product dimensions:
4.30(w) x 7.52(h) x 1.42(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

What People are saying about this

From the Publisher
"Arctic Drift has exotic locations, ruthless villains, and many narrow escapes and derring-do by Dirk Pitt, oceanography's answer to Indiana Jones. Cussler's fans come for swashbuckling [and] he delivers." -Associated Press

Meet the Author

Clive Cussler is the author of many New York Times bestsellers, most recently The Spy and Lost Empire. He lives in Arizona.

DIRK CUSSLER, has an MBA from Berkeley, worked many years in the financial arena and has been an active participant in the real-life NUMA® expeditions, and served as president of the NUMA® advisory board of trustees. He lives in Arizona.

Brief Biography

Hometown:
Phoenix, Arizona
Date of Birth:
July 15, 1931
Place of Birth:
Aurora, Illinois
Education:
Pasadena City College; Ph.D., Maritime College, State University of New York, 1997

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Crescent Dawn 3.9 out of 5 based on 1 ratings. 561 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I would love to buy these novels for my Nook, but not when I can get the paperback for around $5.00. Thought that was kinda the point for digitizing books. Cuts down on production cost. Work on that will ya!
azarmor More than 1 year ago
Excellent story. Clive Cussler and Edgar Rice Burroughs have a lot of parallels. Found writing later in life after previous occupations didn't satisy them. Good vs Evil. Good wins out. You don't always get the girl with Cussler, like you do with Burroughs, but still an outstanding read. Entertainment wins out!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book certainly brings out the research that went into producing it in the first place. So much of the Middle East history and the characters that might have been. Reading it opened my eyes to the Muslim world and Christianity as well. Well done, overall. I thought the idea of discovering the manifest cargo onboard a Roman vessel certainly had a lot of merit. It is really too bad that all this was only fiction. I was a bit puzzled by the title, but I'm sure the authors could explain. Another well thought through novel by the Cussler's for sure.
Texas_ More than 1 year ago
I started with the early books by Clive Cussler and thought they were the greatest. But, for some reason, Clive did not write for several years. When the dry spell ended, I was shocked by the change in writing style. Clive decided to reduce and degrade the Dirk Pit series by selling the "Clive Cussler" name and the "Dirk Pitt" name for nothing more than $$$ to other authors. Clive... you ARE Dirk Pitt, no other author can be Dirk Pitt because he comes from you. I can't figure out if Clive Cussler is unable or just plain unwilling to write the Dirk Pitt series himself. The "Crescent Dawn" book has Dirk Pitt embracing Islam as if he is also a true beliver in Islam. Here is Dirk Pitt, a true American hero from bygone books, embracing a belief system that has a burning hatred for America and Americans. It is beyond me to understand why Clive has let this happen. Guys... just write great books and quit trying to make a political statement!!! I have seen some good reviews of this book. If you had read the early books, penned by Clive himself, you would understand why I don't like this book. As a loyal fan from the early years, I feel betrayed and insulted that Clive has sold his name and Dirk to other authors.
RichardWellner More than 1 year ago
Darth Vader is a hater. Crescent Dawn is the most carefully crafted book since 1984. I'm talking about the book not the year. I feel like Dirk is the brother I never had. Clive spoiled us with this one. #dat
BrayElder More than 1 year ago
I became a fan of Dirk Pitt and Clive Cussler through seeing a movie and then reading the book . . . and got hooked on the series. One of the things that has always stood out to me is how Mr. Cussler is able to mix fiction with just the right amount of fact and a little ‘over the top’ and still have you think. . .’okay maybe . . .’ I admire him for that. However having just completed reading “Crescent Dawn’ it saddens me to admit that I was disappointed. While the base elements of a Dirk Pitt adventure where still there and very visible to the reader the last part of the book seemed to make the proverbial left turn into ‘never never land’ and in doing so became so unbelievable that it ruined the book for me. As a fan of the character I would recommend the read, but if you are looking for your first Dirk Pitt adventure- I’d suggest to looking at one of the older books. In my opinion it is not the best in the series.
lapTX More than 1 year ago
I have been a huge Clive Cussler fan for the past few years. Anticipating the next book. This book was a big disappointment. Though I finished the book, it was a struggle to complete.
OldeTurtle More than 1 year ago
There has never been an author upon whom you could so consistently rely as Clive Cussler. His books are hard to put down. Unfortunately, with Crescent Dawn, it was easy to put down and hard to pick up again. The locations could not be less interesting, or at least they are made dreadfully dull in this book. The place names are so esoteric and obscure as to solicit a heart-felt "Who cares?". The reading is as dry and tedious as the dig sites described. If you can make your tortuous way through the first 250 pages, you might catch a glimmer of adventure, only to be disappointed that the glimmer fizzles much more quickly than it arrived. We are forced to slog through more than 500 pages of deadly prose and stilted dialogue. It feels odd saying 'skip this one' to a Clive Cussler book, but trust me; you will do your self a favor by taking a pass on this one.
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Great book will make you wonder
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Well written, sucks you in from first chapter. Loved the twists and turns. The history was as fascinating as the action. Loved it!
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