Cricket at the Manger

Cricket at the Manger

by Edith Fine, Winslow Pels
     
 

A brilliant light shines in the night sky. The streets of the town are filled with people. And a cricket, sleeping in a stable, burrows under the straw. A donkey enters carrying a woman. "It's time," she says to her husband. "No sleep tonight!" says the cricket. But, later, when the cricket sees an infant in the manger, his thoughts of sleep are banished, for the

Overview

A brilliant light shines in the night sky. The streets of the town are filled with people. And a cricket, sleeping in a stable, burrows under the straw. A donkey enters carrying a woman. "It's time," she says to her husband. "No sleep tonight!" says the cricket. But, later, when the cricket sees an infant in the manger, his thoughts of sleep are banished, for the cricket knows that this night is meant for rejoicing. Here is the story of the Nativity as told through the voice of one of the smallest creatures in the stable. Edith Hope Fine's poetic text and Winslow Pels's glorious illustrations combine to make this a special book for a special time of year.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
A grumpy cricket tries to get some rest in Cricket at the Manger by Edith Hope Fine, illus. by Winslow Pels. "Is there no peace?" he begins, yet he has a change of heart by book's end: "All's well. Sing joy!" Both humans and creatures stare in wide-eyed wonderment. Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature
Cricket is trying to sleep in the early morning hours of Christmas Eve. How is he to know that the animals and people who have disturbed his sleep are special? These are the witnesses of the birth of baby Jesus, the child long awaited by the people of Israel. Cricket can only see that they are in his way, and that he can easily be stepped on. When the young shepherd girl picks him up and allows him to see the child in the manger, cricket stops thinking of himself and seeks to do something that will make the baby laugh. This is yet another angle on the Christmas Story, and although told from another perspective, it is true to the original story. This will make a nice gift book for the holidays, but it is difficult to see what would set it apart from the myriad of other re-tellings of this great story. The text in 17 pt. Papyrus font, and the sparkly, jewel-like stars add interest. 2005, Clarion Books/Houghton Mifflin, Ages 6 to 8.
—Joyce Rice
Kirkus Reviews
A large, silver-gray cricket with human eyes is the first-person narrator of this unusual Nativity story told all in short sentences and phrases with lots of animal sound effects. The cricket is a cranky sort who can only make odd sounds, and he is trying to sleep in the stable when Mary and Joseph arrive. Other animals and shepherds crowd in as well, including a shepherd girl who lifts the cricket up to see the newborn baby. The cricket wants to join in the animal chorus singing for the Christ Child and, inspired by an angel playing a stringed instrument, the cricket remembers how to play his own proper cricket song. Pels has created stunning illustrations in mixed medium, including sparkling jewels incorporated into her art. The illustrations, in an extra-large format, are set against textured tan backgrounds with the look of sand. Large, decorative capital letters in brown and black set off each section of the text, further enhancing the volume's sophisticated design. (Picture book. 4-8)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781563979934
Publisher:
Highlights Press
Publication date:
09/28/2005
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
9.00(w) x 12.00(h) x (d)
Age Range:
5 - 7 Years

Meet the Author

Edith Hope Fine loves the rhythm of language and the sounds of invented words. Her work includes the picture books Under the Lemon Moon and Cryptomania! Edith lives in southern California.

Winslow Pels has illustrat

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