Crime and Punishment (Pevear / Volokhonsky Translation) (Everyman's Library)

( 406 )

Overview

Raskolnikov, an impoverished student living in the St. Petersburg of the tsars, is determined to overreach his humanity and assert his untrammeled individual will. When he commits an act of murder and theft, he sets into motion a story that, for its excruciating suspense, its atmospheric vividness, and its depth of characterization and vision is almost unequaled in the literatures of the world. The best known of Dostoevsky’s masterpieces, Crime and Punishment can bear any amount of rereading without losing a drop...

See more details below
Hardcover
$24.00
BN.com price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (28) from $7.00   
  • New (15) from $14.11   
  • Used (13) from $7.00   
Crime and Punishment

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK Study
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$7.99
BN.com price
Marketplace
BN.com

All Available Formats & Editions

Overview

Raskolnikov, an impoverished student living in the St. Petersburg of the tsars, is determined to overreach his humanity and assert his untrammeled individual will. When he commits an act of murder and theft, he sets into motion a story that, for its excruciating suspense, its atmospheric vividness, and its depth of characterization and vision is almost unequaled in the literatures of the world. The best known of Dostoevsky’s masterpieces, Crime and Punishment can bear any amount of rereading without losing a drop of its power over our imaginations.

Dostoevsky’s drama of sin, guilt, and redemption transforms the sordid story of an old woman’s murder into the nineteenth century’s profoundest and most compelling philosophical novel.

Award-winning translators Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky render this elusive and wildly innovative novel with an energy, suppleness, and range of voice that do full justice to the genius of its creator.

With the same suppleness, energy, and range of voices that won their translation of The Brothers Karamazov the PEN/Book-of-the-Month Club Prize, Pevear and Volokhonsky offer a brilliant translation of Dostoevsky's classic novel that presents a clear insight into this astounding psychological thriller. "The best (translation) currently available"--Washington Post Book World.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“The best [translation of Crime and Punishment] currently available…An especially faithful re-creation…with a coiled-spring kinetic energy…Don’t miss it.” –Washington Post Book World

“This fresh, new translation…provides a more exact, idiomatic, and contemporary rendition of the novel that brings Fyodor Dostoevsky’s tale achingly alive…It succeeds beautifully.” –San Francisco Chronicle

“Reaches as close to Dostoevsky’s Russian as is possible in English…The original’s force and frightening immediacy is captured…The Pevear and Volokhonsky translation will become the standard English version.”–Chicago Tribune

From Barnes & Noble
A powerful psychological study, a terrifying murder mystery, and a riveting detective story, this is the classic tale of an unrepentant murderer who finally admits his guilt and finds redemption through the kindesss and love of a young woman.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780679420293
  • Publisher: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 5/28/1993
  • Series: Everyman's Library
  • Pages: 608
  • Sales rank: 377,966
  • Product dimensions: 5.29 (w) x 8.32 (h) x 1.37 (d)

Read an Excerpt

CHAPTER 1

On an exceptionally hot evening early in July a young man came out of the garret in which he lodged in S. Place and walked slowly, as though in hesitation, towards K. Bridge.

He had successfully avoided meeting his landlady on the staircase. His garret was under the roof of a high, five-storied house, and was more like a cupboard than a room. The landlady, who provided him with garret, dinners, and attendance, lived on the floor below, and every time he went out he was obliged to pass her kitchen, the door of which invariably stood open. And each time he passed, the young man had a sick, frightened feeling, which made him scowl and feel ashamed. He was hopelessly in debt to his landlady, and was afraid of meeting her.

This was not because he was cowardly and abject, quite the contrary; but for some time past, he had been in an over-strained, irritable condition, verging on hypochondria. He had become so completely absorbed in himself, and isolated from his fellows that he dreaded meeting, not only his landlady, but any one at all. He was crushed by poverty, but the anxieties of his position had of late ceased to weigh upon him. He had given up attending to matters of practical importance; he had lost all desire to do so. Nothing that any landlady could do had a real terror for him. But to be stopped on the stairs, to be forced to listen to her trivial, irrelevant gossip, to pestering demands for payment, threats and complaints, and to rack his brains for excuses, to prevaricate, to lie—no, rather than that, he would creep down the stairs like a cat and slip out unseen.

This evening, however, on coming out into the street, he became acutely aware of his fears.

"I want to attempt a thing like that and am frightened by these trifles," he thought, with an odd smile. "Hm . . . yes, all is in a man's hands and he lets it all slip from cowardice, that's an axiom. It would be interesting to know what it is men are most afraid of. Taking a new step, uttering a new word is what they fear most. . . . But I am talking too much. It's because I chatter that I do nothing. Or perhaps it is that I chatter because I do nothing. I've learned to chatter this last month, lying for days together in my den thinking . . . of Jack the Giant-killer. Why am I going there now? Am I capable of that? Is that serious? It is not serious at all. It's simply a fantasy to amuse myself; a plaything! Yes, maybe it is a plaything."

The heat in the street was terrible: and the airlessness, the bustle and the plaster, scaffolding, bricks, and dust all about him, and that special Petersburg stench, so familiar to all who are unable to get out of town in summer—all worked painfully upon the young man's already overwrought nerves. The insufferable stench from the pot-houses, which are particularly numerous in that part of the town, and the drunken men whom he met continually, although it was a working day, completed the revolting misery of the picture. An expression of the profoundest disgust gleamed for a moment in the young man's refined face. He was, by the way, exceptionally handsome, above the average in height, slim, well-built, with beautiful dark eyes and dark brown hair. Soon he sank into deep thought, or more accurately speaking into a complete blankness of mind; he walked along not observing what was about him and not caring to observe it. From time to time, he would mutter something, from the habit of talking to himself, to which he had just confessed. At these moments he would become conscious that his ideas were sometimes in a tangle and that he was very weak; for two days he had scarcely tasted food.

He was so badly dressed that even a man accustomed to shabbiness would have been ashamed to be seen in the street in such rags. In that quarter of the town, however, scarcely any short-coming in dress would have created surprise. Owing to the proximity of the Hay Market, the number of establishments of bad character, the preponderance of the trading and working class population crowded in these streets and alleys in the heart of Petersburg, types so various were to be seen in the streets that no figure, however queer, would have caused surprise. But there was such accumulated bitterness and contempt in the young man's heart that, in spite of all the fastidiousness of youth, he minded his rags least of all in the street. It was a different matter when he met with acquaintances or with former fellow students, whom, indeed, he disliked meeting at any time. And yet when a drunken man who, for some unknown reason, was being taken somewhere in a huge waggon dragged by a heavy dray horse, suddenly shouted at him as he drove past: "Hey there, German hatter!" bawling at the top of his voice and pointing at him—the young man stopped suddenly and clutched tremulously at his hat. It was a tall round hat from Zimmerman's, but completely worn out, rusty with age, all torn and bespattered, brimless and bent on one side in a most unseemly fashion. Not shame, however, but quite another feeling akin to terror had overtaken him.

"I knew it," he muttered in confusion, "I thought so! That's the worst of all! Why, a stupid thing like this, the most trivial detail might spoil the whole plan. Yes, my hat is too noticeable. . . . It looks absurd and that makes it noticeable. . . . With my rags I ought to wear a cap, any sort of old pancake, but not this grotesque thing. Nobody wears such a hat, it would be noticed a mile off, it would be remembered. . . . What matters is that people would remember it, and that would give them a clue. For this business one should be as little conspicuous as possible. . . . Trifles, trifles are what matter! Why, it's just such trifles that always ruin everything. . . ."

He had not far to go; he knew indeed how many steps it was from the gate of his lodging house: exactly seven hundred and thirty. He had counted them once when he had been lost in dreams. At the time he had put no faith in those dreams and was only tantalising himself by their hideous but daring recklessness. Now, a month later, he had begun to look upon them differently, and, in spite of the monologues in which he jeered at his own impotence and indecision, he had involuntarily come to regard this "hideous" dream as an exploit to be attempted, although he still did not realise this himself. He was positively going now for a "rehearsal" of his project, and at every step his excitement grew more and more violent.

With a sinking heart and a nervous tremor, he went up to a huge house which on one side looked on to the canal, and on the other into the street. This house was let out in tiny tenements and was inhabited by working people of all kinds—tailors, locksmiths, cooks, Germans of sorts, girls picking up a living as best they could, petty clerks, etc. There was a continual coming and going through the two gates and in the two court-yards of the house. Three or four door-keepers were employed on the building. The young man was very glad to meet none of them, and at once slipped unnoticed through the door on the right, and up the staircase. It was a back staircase, dark and narrow, but he was familiar with it already, and knew his way, and he liked all these surroundings: in such darkness even the most inquisitive eyes were not to be dreaded.

"If I am so scared now, what would it be if it somehow came to pass that I were really going to do it?" he could not help asking himself as he reached the fourth storey. There his progress was barred by some porters who were engaged in moving furniture out of a flat. He knew that the flat had been occupied by a German clerk in the civil service, and his family. This German was moving out then, and so the fourth floor on this staircase would be untenanted except by the old woman. "That's a good thing anyway," he thought to himself, as he rang the bell of the old woman's flat. The bell gave a faint tinkle as though it were made of tin and not of copper. The little flats in such houses always have bells that ring like that. He had forgotten the note of that bell, and now its peculiar tinkle seemed to remind him of something and to bring it clearly before him. . . . He started, his nerves were terribly overstrained by now. In a little while, the door was opened a tiny crack: the old woman eyed her visitor with evident distrust through the crack, and nothing could be seen but her little eyes, glittering in the darkness. But, seeing a number of people on the landing, she grew bolder, and opened the door wide. The young man stepped into the dark entry, which was partitioned off from the tiny kitchen. The old woman stood facing him in silence and looking inquiringly at him. She was a diminutive, withered-up old woman of sixty, with sharp malignant eyes and a sharp little nose. Her colourless, somewhat grizzled hair was thickly smeared with oil, and she wore no kerchief over it. Round her thin long neck, which looked like a hen's leg, was knotted some sort of flannel rag, and, in spite of the heat, there hung flapping on her shoulders, a mangy fur cape, yellow with age. The old woman coughed and groaned at every instant. The young man must have looked at her with a rather peculiar expression, for a gleam of mistrust came into her eyes again.

"Raskolnikov, a student, I came here a month ago," the young man made haste to mutter, with a half-bow, remembering that he ought to be more polite.

"I remember, my good sir, I remember quite well your coming here," the old woman said distinctly, still keeping her inquiring eyes on his face.

"And here . . . I am again on the same errand," Raskolnikov continued, a little disconcerted and surprised at the old woman's mistrust. "Perhaps she is always like that though, only I did not notice it the other time," he thought with an uneasy feeling.

The old woman paused, as though hesitating; then stepped on one side, and pointing to the door of the room, she said, letting her visitor pass in front of her:

"Step in, my good sir."

The little room into which the young man walked, with yellow paper on the walls, geraniums and muslin curtains in the windows, was brightly lighted up at that moment by the setting sun.

"So the sun will shine like this then too!" flashed as it were by chance through Raskolnikov's mind, and with a rapid glance he scanned everything in the room, trying as far as possible to notice and remember its arrangement. But there was nothing special in the room. The furniture, all very old and of yellow wood, consisted of a sofa with a huge bent wooden back, an oval table in front of the sofa, a dressing-table with a looking-glass fixed on it between the windows, chairs along the walls and two or three halfpenny prints in yellow frames, representing German damsels with birds in their hands—that was all. In the corner a light was burning before a small ikon. Everything was very clean; the floor and the furniture were brightly polished; everything shone.

"Lizaveta's work," thought the young man. There was not a speck of dust to be seen in the whole flat.

"It's in the houses of spiteful old widows that one finds such cleanliness," Raskolnikov thought again, and he stole a curious glance at the cotton curtain over the door leading into another tiny room, in which stood the old woman's bed and chest of drawers and into which he had never looked before. These two rooms made up the whole flat.

"What do you want?" the old woman said severely, coming into the room and, as before, standing in front of him so as to look him straight in the face.

"I've brought something to pawn here," and he drew out of his pocket an old-fashioned flat silver watch, on the back of which was engraved a globe; the chain was of steel.

"But the time is up for your last pledge. The month was up the day before yesterday."

"I will bring you the interest for another month; wait a little."

"But that's for me to do as I please, my good sir, to wait or to sell your pledge at once."

"How much will you give me for the watch, Alyona Ivanovna?"

"You come with such trifles, my good sir, it's scarcely worth anything. I gave you two roubles last time for your ring and one could buy it quite new at a jeweller's for a rouble and a half."

"Give me four roubles for it, I shall redeem it, it was my father's. I shall be getting some money soon."

"A rouble and a half, and interest in advance, if you like!"

"A rouble and a half!" cried the young man.

"Please yourself"—and the old woman handed him back the watch. The young man took it, and was so angry that he was on the point of going away; but checked himself at once, remembering that there was nowhere else he could go, and that he had had another object also in coming.

"Hand it over," he said roughly.

The old woman fumbled in her pocket for her keys, and disappeared behind the curtain into the other room. The young man, left standing alone in the middle of the room, listened inquisitively, thinking. He could hear her unlocking the chest of drawers.

"It must be the top drawer," he reflected. "So she carries the keys in a pocket on the right. All in one bunch on a steel ring. . . . And there's one key there, three times as big as all the others, with deep notches; that can't be the key of the chest of drawers . . . then there must be some other chest or strong-box . . . that's worth knowing. Strong-boxes always have keys like that . . . but how degrading it all is."

The old woman came back.

"Here, sir: as we say ten copecks the rouble a month, so I must take fifteen copecks from a rouble and a half for the month in advance. But for the two roubles I lent you before, you owe me now twenty copecks on the same reckoning in advance. That makes thirty-five copecks altogether. So I must give you a rouble and fifteen copecks for the watch. Here it is."

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 406 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(236)

4 Star

(86)

3 Star

(38)

2 Star

(17)

1 Star

(29)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 410 Customer Reviews
  • Posted August 2, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Incredible Book!!!

    This summer I wanted to read a book that was a "smart people book." So I thought I would read Crime and Punishment, since I love crime stories so much. I really did not expect myself to love this book so much. It was so intense and thrilling. I read the last 130 pages in one sitting it got so intense. During the last pages, all of the subplots finally climaxed and I realized they were more than just subplots. The ending was great, I nearly cried when the book was over. This is one of the few books that when I finished, I wanted to start reading it all over again. I would recommend this book to anyone, it is not such a hard read at all.

    15 out of 16 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 22, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    A chilling, intellectually captivating novel

    Immediately upon reading the first few chapters of "Crime and Punishment" by Fyodor Dostoevsky, it should be blatantly obvious to any reader that this book is a brilliant classic. Upon first sight, this book would seem as though it would be a typical whodunit murder book, but on the contrary, the book revolves around not the details of the murder of a bitter pawnbroker in St. Petersburg, but the details of the conscience of a rather unscrupulous figure who is the protagonist, Raskolnikov. The psychological level upon which impoverished Raskolnikov functions on is beyond the scope of certainly what most people I know can even comprehend, delivering intricate insights into the mind of a genius who is capable of the most heinous crime a human can commit. The book is one I would recommend everyone read at least once in their lifetime, if they have the patience to press through somewhat difficult yet adaptable Russian names such as Zossimov, Koch, and Razumikhin, which can add to the confusion of the plot at times, and the energy to push through this fairly lengthy book. If you have the capacity to take on the self-inflicted wound that is a Dostoevsky book, by all means, conquer the mountain of a read, as although this book was the most difficult I have read, it is easily my favorite book. Because I have never read any of Dostoevsky's books other than "Crime and Punishment" and I quite honestly cannot even begin to recall books to compare to this paramount novel, I cannot recommend any books from my own experience. However, I can say that "Notes from the Underground" would be the next logical progression from this book, as it dives into existentialism, the psychological concept which Dostoevsky is most notorious for coining and developing. "Crime and Punishment" is a deep book that is worthy of any respectable reader's collection and time, due to its psychological complexity and captivating intellectual nature.

    9 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 25, 2009

    Deep

    This is a deep book. Deep in a typical Russian way. It is a comprehensive and accurate analyzation/documentation of a criminal's mind, which at the same time is the mind of a moral genius. There is no good or evil side, no black and white, as the Russians say: only grey.
    By the way, our protagonist is a stunning pretty boy, so as his best friend.

    7 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 6, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Psychological Look At the Criminal Mind

    If you require a novel that is plot driven this novel is not for you. However, if you enjoy a novel with complex characters that delve into what motivates those characters this is the book for you.<br/><br/>Often our view of a murderer is one of absolutes. He/she is 1) purely evil, 2) pushed to commit the act, 3) temporarily insane, 4) driven to do it for survival, 5) or comes from a background that does not allow him/her to discern right from wrong. Dostoyevsky doesn't allow us off that easy. Raskolnikov does not fit tightly into any of those categories. He is well loved by family and friend, and although he commits a grusome, cold-blooded, and well thought out murder in the opening of the book, Raskolnikov makes sacrifices for those who are in need. The recipients of his good deeds are often those with whom he has little history.

    So why does Raskolnikov commit the murder? Dostoyevsky never provides concrete evidence to that end only suggestions.As stated above there is not a lot happening in the plot. Crime and Punishment is more about the mind of a complex individual. There are some wonderful subplots as well. The storyline of Sonya and Dounia add a lot to the reader's experience. Dostoyevsky has a talent for vividly enacting a scene. One of my favorite scenes is when Raskolnikov "confesses" to Zametov. I can just see it on the big screen.

    People are often intidmiated by Russian Lit. There is no need to be. This is an excellent read. I can see where the references to characters could throw some. Characters are often referred to by various names. My suggestion is to pay attention to the uniqueness of each character. You will begin to identify each by his or her characteristics.

    When you read reviews or commentaries on this book most attention is paid to Raskolnikov. However, I really loved Razumihin. Dostoyevsky also creates a delicious villain in Petrovitch.

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 25, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Is he bitshat crazy? Is he superman? Is everyone bitshat crazy? Or is everyone and no one superman?

    A must-read. Even if you think that this will just be some boring, ridiculously long book that people only read because they have to, you will hate that you have to put it down to eat, sleep, and do real work. Be sure to read it before you have to, because it would be terrible to have to skim over parts because you are being made to finish it within a certain time frame.

    5 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 1, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    Psychological thriller!

    Yes, the release of Crime and Punishment heralded the rise of the modern crime novel, but this book delves far beyond the shallow case-solving inanity of the typical "whodunit?" Dostoevsky, a master of the psychology of the human mind, portrays his characters perfectly, as real human beings, neither idealized nor vilified. Raskolnikov, the protagonist, murders an old woman and her sister, but in spite of his heinous crime, I really saw his humanity throughout the book as his psyche just tortures him to death. In fact, Dostoevsky is so good at crafting dynamic characters that he makes Svidrigailov seem more repulsive than Raskolnikov when, in reality, Svidrigailov has probably not committed any comparable crime. The story focuses mostly on the mental perturbations of Raskolnikov as he struggles with himself, practically becoming insane in the process. However, Dostoevsky fills his book with a delightfully varied cast of colorful characters to incorporate differing psychological aspects of, you guessed it, crime and punishment. I don't want to reveal too much in this review--suffice it to say that this is a superb literary achievement that you simply must own and read over and over again.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 19, 2008

    Crime and Punishment

    I have just finished reading Crime and Punishment by Fort Dostoevsky. It is my first Dostoevsky book, and I have really enjoyed it. He writes Very strong dialogue, characterization, and relating it to other social ideas and conflicts throughout history. <BR/> Crime and Punishment is pretty much about a man, Raskolnikov, who commits a crime at the beginning of the story. He begins to feel extremely depressed and you, as the reader, follow him through his mental delirium as he realizes how he has changed his like and the life of others around him. <BR/> Early in the book you learn that Raskolnikov models himself after Napoleon and his crimes against humanity. He believes that ¿the only thing that matters is to dare.¿<BR/> A lot of times when reading dialogue, some characters may sound unreal, as if the character would not actually say something as it was written. But Dostoevsky¿s characters sound real, which makes the characters and the overall book better and more enjoyable. <BR/> I would recommend Crime and Punishment to anyone who enjoys an emotional novel and has patience with a bit of a slower-moving plot. Overall, I believe this was a great book with many interesting meanings.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 1, 2008

    Quite Disappointing

    Of course I didn't want to read the book from the start, but as I am in an Advanced course at school I must. I did not enjoy reading Crime and Punishment. It has some improper grammar in it (ie: 'Raskolnikov waked up') Which can cause people to twitch, such as myself. If you're into long books that are hard to follow this is PERFECT for you!

    3 out of 28 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted November 27, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Crime and Punishment

    This was a very good book! Although it was long, I found myself unable to put it down; worth the buy.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 2, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Crime and punishment

    This book was a really good book, it was recommended to me by all my English teachers and i don't know a single person who hasn't read it. Its a great thriller which involves critical thinking. The details used are hard and gruesome which makes a dark tone and mood for a good detective novel!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 26, 2008

    Summer Homework a Pleasant Surprise!

    Wow! This book was so good! I had to read it over the summmer, and I loved it. Everyone complained 'oh, how horrible, he's Russian!' Well, even though I worry about how to pronounce his characters names, I loved this book! Everyone should read it.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 25, 2008

    Wonderful Story

    I recently decided to put myself through a classics program on my own. So many of the classics were not required in school. This is the second classic in my program and it was outstanding. For me, the first 50 or so pages were pretty dry, but after that it came alive. The story is great and the insight into St. Petersburg and Russian culture are interesting. It is a long read, but well worth it. Don't let the size of the book intimidate you!!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 1, 2000

    relating in a bad way

    The characters in this book remind you of the worst things in yourself. Raskolnikov, a romantic plagued by his mind, and Svidrigailov, the life swallowing debaucher. A mirror to those who think too much.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 23, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    This book made me think. It was philosophical and though at time

    This book made me think. It was philosophical and though at times I wanted to punch Rodya, I liked the book. And now I have a different outlook on life. Thanks to AP Literature and Composition.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 16, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Classic

    I've read this many times, and will probably read it many times more. Dostoevsky is one of my favorite authors for delving into the psyche of his characters in detail, sometimes flawed detail. It's a must read, and one that I hope the young adults out there are fascinated with, as I was so long ago...

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 14, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    True Russian classic

    This is a great book. There are few books that better portray a deranged criminal mind. Dostoevsky does such a good job of character development that the charactrers really feel real to the reader. This book can seem a little long and boring at times, but overall I feel that it was worth reading. It really does give me a better understanding of the darker side of the human psyche.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 15, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    a great story

    An old lady and her sister are brutally murdered with an ax. A smart<BR/>detective starts investigation. Who did it?<BR/><BR/>Just kidding...

    1 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 2, 2008

    Great book, great read

    I love to read books that introduce me to something new. Crime and Punishment was not only a great story, but also served as a window into russian culture (something I knew next to nothing about. I highly recomend this book.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 24, 2008

    A Wonderful Book

    ¿Crime And Punishment¿ is written by Fyodor Dostoyevsky and published by New American Library in New York 1968. I thought this book was interesting and a true mind twister. It makes the readers search deep into themselves as the obviously mad man goes wild with confusion. Raskolnikov, a poor student, thinks he is wonderful and makes a theory where the extraordinary men of the world have a right to commit any crime if they have something to offer humanity. To prove his theory, he murders an old, despicable pawnbroker and her half-sister. Immediately after the crime, he becomes sick and stays in his room for a while. When he recovers, he finds that his friend Razumihkin, looked for him. While he is recovering, he gets a visit from his sister¿s fiancé Luzhin. Raskolnikov insults Luzhin and sends him away because he doesn¿t like his attitude toward Dunya. As soon as he can go out again, Raskolnikov reads about the crime in all the newspapers of the last few days. He meets an official from the police station and almost confesses the crime. He becomes suspicious. When he returns to his room, he finds his mother and sister who have just arrived to prepare for the wedding with Luzhin. He refuses to allow his sister to marry such a mean and nasty man. At the same time, Svidrigailov, Dunya¿s former employer, arrives in town and looks up Raskolnikov and asks for a meeting with Dunya. Svidrigailov had attempted to seduce Dunya and when Raskolnikov heard of it, he naturally formed a violent dislike for the man. Raskolnikov hears that the police inspector, Porfiry, is interviewing all people who had ever had any business with the old pawnbroker. He goes for an interview and leaves thinking that the police suspect him. He meets Sonya Marmeladov, the daughter of a dead man that he had helped. He goes to her and asks her to read him the story of Lazarus. He feels sympathy for Sonya who had been forced into prostitution in order to support her family while her father drank constantly. He promises to tell her who murdered the old pawnbroker and her sister who was a friend of Sonya¿s. After another interview with Porfiry Raskolnikov decides to confess to Sonya. He gies back to her and during the confession, Svidrigailov is listening through a door. He uses this information to try to force Dunya to sleep with him. She refuses and he kills himself later in the night. Porfiry informs Raskolnikov that he knows who murdered the pawnbroker. After talking with Sonya, Raskolnikov fully confesses to the murder and is sentenced to eight years in a Siberian prison. Sonya follows him, and with her help, Raskolnikov begins his new life. This is an interesting and intriguing book ranking with the classics of Shakespeare and some of the greats.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 13, 2007

    Fantastic Story

    What a fantastic story this is. Sometimes we read classics and get too caught up in symbolism and meaning. Crime and Punishment is just a great story. While vivid descriptions make reading the book like watching a movie, the story carries you through the multitude of pages quite easily. The game of cat and mouse between Raskolinov and Porfiry is intriguing and the inner struggle of yound Rodia, puts you in to his shoes as he walks a thin line between theory and delerium. Read this book!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 410 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)