Crime and Punishment (Unabridged Garnett Translation)

Crime and Punishment (Unabridged Garnett Translation)

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by Fyodor Dostoyevsky
     
 

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Crime and Punishment is a novel by the Russian author Fyodor Dostoyevsky (sometimes spelled Dostoevsky). It was first published in the literary journal The Russian Messenger in twelve monthly installments during 1866. It was later published in a single volume. This is the second of Dostoyevsky's full-length novels following his return from ten years of exile in

Overview

Crime and Punishment is a novel by the Russian author Fyodor Dostoyevsky (sometimes spelled Dostoevsky). It was first published in the literary journal The Russian Messenger in twelve monthly installments during 1866. It was later published in a single volume. This is the second of Dostoyevsky's full-length novels following his return from ten years of exile in Siberia. Crime and Punishment is the first great novel of his "mature" period of writing. Crime and Punishment focuses on the mental anguish and moral dilemmas of Rodion Raskolnikov, an impoverished ex-student in St. Petersburg who formulates and executes a plan to kill an unscrupulous pawnbroker for her cash. Raskolnikov argues that with the pawnbroker's money he can perform good deeds to counterbalance the crime, while ridding the world of a worthless vermin. He also commits this murder to test his own hypothesis that some people are naturally capable of such things, and even have the right to do them. Several times throughout the novel, Raskolnikov justifies his actions by connecting himself mentally with Napoleon Bonaparte, believing that murder is permissible in pursuit of a higher purpose…

Constance Clara Garnett (1861 - 1946) was an English translator of nineteenth-century Russian literature. Garnett was one of the first English translators of Leo Tolstoy, Fyodor Dostoyevsky and Anton Chekhov and introduced them on a wide basis to the English-speaking public. Constance Garnett translated 71 volumes of Russian literary works. Her translations received high acclaim from authors such as Joseph Conrad and D. H. Lawrence and are still being reprinted today.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9788074840364
Publisher:
e-artnow Editions
Publication date:
02/20/2013
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
578
File size:
765 KB

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Crime and Punishment 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 188 reviews.
Brainylainy More than 1 year ago
I tried reading the Garnett translation that has been a sort of standard for years. However, I found it far too smooth, to like what an English teacher dictates for writing complete, complex, long sentences. That might be okay for another author, but Dostoevsky? Absolutely no! He wrote with passion. With anger. With joy. With tenderness. With deliberate fragments. Indeed, he was the father of the modern novel. Holden Caulfield owes everything to Dostoevsky, and so does Virginia Woolf. The only translation of this that captures the original is Pevear and Volokhonsky's. Unfortunately, B&N does not have that available for NOOK, so I dug out my physical copy and, awkward as it is compared to an e-book, I'm engrossed in it. (BTW, I believe Kindle has the P & V translation available. It has all their other translations that I've looked at.)
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I want this book and would even pay for a better format (less typos etc.) But how can I tell ? All the same reviews appear with each offered edition. Same complaints, reported problems. No help at all.
Benja More than 1 year ago
A must-read. Even if you think that this will just be some boring, ridiculously long book that people only read because they have to, you will hate that you have to put it down to eat, sleep, and do real work. Be sure to read it before you have to, because it would be terrible to have to skim over parts because you are being made to finish it within a certain time frame.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Too many errors in the spelling. Many words missing letters or have symbols instead of letters. It makes it very difficult to read in a smooth manner.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I was looking forward to reading this as a free book for my Nook, but it was filled with so many typos it was like reading the book in the original Russian. I don't know if all the free books are like this, but I spent too much time trying to decipher this one.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I picked up the greatest piece of literature that ever graced my hands. People's parents who read this book thought it tasteless but this book is incredible. It places you in the shoes of a man suffers from the crime he did and you will feel sympathy for a murderer.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is an amazing book. Though I read it just this past summer at the age of 13, I am also an advanced reader for my age and found Crime and Punishment to be one of my favorite books. I love how Dostoyevsky presents Raskolnikov's psychological views on Extraordinary and ordinary men. Five Stars easily. I recommend this book to anybody looking for a truly great read.
Guest More than 1 year ago
When I first read this in tenth grade I had just begun a long track out of depression, and had not the begining of this novel so accurately portrayed his mental state before (as well as after) his murder I may not have bothered with this long book. I loved it. The phsycology is so intense and so accuarate! You love the characters (espescially Raskolnikov and Sonia), but the characters are also in a sotory - it is a story not just phsycology. I can't wait to finish other works of Dostoyevsky.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Finished this in about three weeks. Unlike war and peace, which took five months...
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A terrific read of a classic thriller that I couldn't put down!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Despite the fact that this translation was not nearly as beautiful as the original, simply the over-all idea and story of Fyodor's Crime and Punishment  remains brilliant. This review might lack quite a bit of information, but it is something in which simply must be read, nonetheless!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
a really nice translation and a good size
Guest More than 1 year ago
Recently I became ensconced in Russian literature--and I suggest others start with David McDuff's translation of 'Crime and Punishment.' While the book is often lauded as a tale of an anti-hero, Raskolnikov, who likens himself with such unmoral people as Napoleon--a category of people Raskolnikov considers 'extraordinary'--that is just the tip of the ice berg. I found that aside from the question of the context of murders' acceptance(wars versus common murders), 'Crime & Punishment' has a theme of counterproductive pride. I don't want to ruin it for those who've yet to read this classic, but after reading it, you will agree. Another reason to read this book is the theme of the hunter becoming the hunted, because, alas, once the hunter stops hunting, he himslef becomes hunted. Porfiry Petrovich is that hunter, a damn good detective character: cunning, cynical, calculating. Give this book a try, you won't be sorry, if you like Russian literature. Enjoy!
Anonymous 18 days ago
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Elizabeth_Anderson More than 1 year ago
Well, I read it, but I think others who have read it know more about it than me. I think I dozed off, unfortunate to say. I was hoping to really get into such a monumental title. Someone pointed out to me that the names being Russian, it makes it harder to follow them in the story. That much is true, much harder than Chekhov, who I follow with ease. So I don’t have much to say about this one except that it seemed a bit more dull than how gripping I think it should have been. A product I would recommend is Sirens of Morning Light by Benjamin Anderson, a quest for a man in Iowa to regain his identity, which becomes entangled with people who claim to have known him when he discovers he is a scientific experiment. The characters remain identifiable.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
In Crime and Punishment, Fyodor Dostoyevsky establishes a character who believed a crime could be justified if you were superior enough. This work is ineffective in proving the point that Raskolnikov was superior to the others because he himself wasn’t able to deal with the guilt of the murder. Dostoyesky sets up Raskolnikov’s character to commit murder for money but later on he tries to justify with the concept of for the common good and superiority but it becomes ineffective when Raskolnikov is unable to carry on his daily functions and move on with his life. Raskolnikov tried to convince that he himself was superior. However, he was able to commit the crime but what he wasn’t able to do was to live with the guilt that accompanied it. It wasn’t simply guilt in itself he even became physically sick. He began to favor the thought of prison instead of the thought of remaining in the emotional state in which he was in. When even others tried to converse with him, his emotional state became even more intense where he would push his loved ones away due to his thought that they would find out. With the emotional state becoming worse each passing day and his guilt overflowing in his mind, he almost confesses to being the murderer to Zametov when he met him at the café. One could say that he was in fact imprisoned at this point; he was a prisoner to his own guilt. This causes Raskolnikov to isolate himself from those he held close and at that point Razumikhim realizes that he was in fact involved in the murders. After enduring a desire of solitude from everyone and anything, he finally confides his secret in the woman he loves, Sonia. Raskolnikov was unable to be superior because he wasn’t able to continue on with his motives of stealing money and provide himself with an education which was his true motive. He is unable to live up to Napoleon who is described in the book with justification of killing people for the better good of the people. The author tries to compare Raskolnikov to Napolean but is ineffective in having Raskolnikov live up to that level. The work is ineffective in portraying the superiority quality but it is effective in describing the human psychology. When explaining the attitudes of the ordinary people the author is able to effectively describe the guilt of a crime eating the conscience away. He accurately describes Raskolnikov as the ordinary man instead of the man of superiority. Raskolnikov allows himself to feel guilty of the murder and it affects himself but it also affects the people around him. The guilty conscience is a common occurrence that could occur in someone else too and the author describes the “ordinary” folks this way as well. The author describes the ordinary people through Raskolnikov’s article by saying they are unable to go through actions that would be better for the society; he says the ordinary folk are always obedient to society ways. Even though Raskolnikov attempts to break off by committing a murder he falls back into the ordinary category when he lets the guilty conscience ruin his life. The author is ineffective when it comes to making Raskolnikov appear as a superior being but is effective in portraying Raskolnikov’s character as an ordinary being.
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