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The crime of the Congo
     

The crime of the Congo

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by Arthur Conan Doyle
 

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PREFACE

There are many of us in England who consider the crime which has been wrought in the Congo lands by King Leopold of Belgium and his followers to be the greatest which has ever been known in human annals. Personally I am strongly of that opinion. There have been great expropriations like that of the Normans in England or of the English in Ireland. There have

Overview

PREFACE

There are many of us in England who consider the crime which has been wrought in the Congo lands by King Leopold of Belgium and his followers to be the greatest which has ever been known in human annals. Personally I am strongly of that opinion. There have been great expropriations like that of the Normans in England or of the English in Ireland. There have been massacres of populations like that of the South Americans by the Spaniards or of subject nations by the Turks. But never before has there been such a mixture of wholesale expropriation and wholesale massacre all done under an odious guise of philanthropy and with the lowest commercial motives as a reason. It is this sordid cause and the unctious hypocrisy which makes this crime unparalleled in its horror.
The witnesses of the crime are of all nations, and there is no possibility of error concerning facts. There are British consuls like Casement, Thesiger, Mitchell and Armstrong, all writing in their official capacity with every detail of fact and date. There are Frenchmen like Pierre Mille and Félicien Challaye, both of whom have written books upon the subject. There are missionaries of many races-Harris, Weeks and Stannard (British); Morrison, Clarke and Shepherd (American); Sjoblom (Swedish) and Father Vermeersch, the Jesuit. There is the eloquent action of the Italian Government, who refused to allow Italian officers to be employed any longer in such hangman's work, and there is the report of the Belgian commission, the evidence before which was suppressed because it was too dreadful for publication; finally, there is the incorruptible evidence of the kodak. Any American citizen who will glance at Mark Twain's "King Leopold's Soliloquy" will see some samples of that. A perusal of all of these sources of information will show that there is not a grotesque, obscene or ferocious torture which human ingenuity could invent which has not been used against these harmless and helpless people.

Product Details

BN ID:
2940019621675
Publisher:
New York : Doubleday, Page & company
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
299 KB

Meet the Author

Sir Arthur Ignatius Conan Doyle was born on May 22, 1859, in Edinburgh, Scotland. His father left when he was five, but returned three years later, however, the family lived in poverty. Arthur was supported by his wealthy uncles and educated in a Jesuit preparatory school, then Stonyhurst College, then another school in Austria, before studying medicine at the University of Edinburgh through 1881.
Beginning in 1879, began writing published stories and article for various magazines and journals. He became a ship's surgeon and traveled to locations such as Greenland and West Africa, completing his doctorate while on board. He eventually set up an unsuccessful medical practice, but ended up writing more stories instead of seeing patients.
Doyle's success as a writer, began when his first Sherlock Holmes mystery was published in a magazine in 1886. A second Holmes story was requested by the magazine, with more appearing as time progressed. Arthur was also a soccer player under the name A. C. Smith, golfer and cricket player.
In 1885, he married Louisa Hawkins, but she died from tuberculosis in 1906. They had two children. He remarried Jean Elizabeth Leckie in 1907, with whom he had three more children. She died in 1940.
In 1890, Doyle studied ophthalmology in Vienna, Austria and opened a practice, but had not a single patient, so he continued writing. Growing increasingly tired of writing Sherlock Holmes, he decided to kill off the character, so he could write historical novels, but there was so much public outcry, that he eventually brought him back. Doyle died on July 7, 1930, from a heart attack in Crowborough, East Sussex, England at the age of 71.

Brief Biography

Date of Birth:
May 22, 1859
Date of Death:
July 7, 1930
Place of Birth:
Edinburgh, Scotland
Place of Death:
Crowborough, Sussex, England
Education:
Edinburgh University, B.M., 1881; M.D., 1885

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The Crime Of The Congo 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago