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Criminal Justice Today: An Introductory Text for the 21st Century / Edition 14
     

Criminal Justice Today: An Introductory Text for the 21st Century / Edition 14

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by Frank J. Schmalleger
 

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ISBN-10: 0134145593

ISBN-13: 9780134145594

Pub. Date: 01/21/2016

Publisher: Pearson

The gold standard for introductory criminal justice texts.

Best-selling and time-tested, Criminal Justice Today: An Introductory Text for the 21st Century,continues to lead the field as the gold-standard for introductory criminal justice texts. Its comprehensive coverage focuses on the crime picture in America and on the three traditional

Overview

The gold standard for introductory criminal justice texts.

Best-selling and time-tested, Criminal Justice Today: An Introductory Text for the 21st Century,continues to lead the field as the gold-standard for introductory criminal justice texts. Its comprehensive coverage focuses on the crime picture in America and on the three traditional elements of the criminal justice system: police, courts, and corrections. Building upon the theme of individual freedom versus personal security, it challenges students to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of the American justice system as it adapts to the needs of a complex and rapidly changing society. An instructor and student favorite, the Fourteenth Edition continues its tradition of thorough analysis of today’s issues in an easy-to-read format.

Criminal Justice Today, 14/e is also available via REVEL™, an interactive learning environment that enables students to read, practice, and study in one continuous experience. Learn more.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780134145594
Publisher:
Pearson
Publication date:
01/21/2016
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
728
Sales rank:
127,251
Product dimensions:
8.40(w) x 10.80(h) x 1.10(d)

Table of Contents

Chapter 1: What Is Criminal Justice?

Chapter 2: The Crime Picture

Chapter 3: The Search for Causes

Chapter 4: Criminal Law

Chapter 5: Policing: History and Structure

Chapter 6: Policing: Purpose and Organization

Chapter 7: Policing: Legal Aspects

Chapter 8: Policing: Issues and Challenges

Chapter 9: The Courts: Structure and Participants

Chapter 10: Pretrial Activities and the Criminal Trial

Chapter 11: Sentencing

Chapter 12: Probation, Parole, and Community Corrections

Chapter 13: Prisons and Jails

Chapter 14: Prison Life

Chapter 15: Juvenile Justice

Chapter 16: Drugs and Crime

Chapter 17: Terrorism, Multinational Criminal Justice, and Global Issues

Chapter 18: High-Technology Crimes

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Criminal Justice Today: An Introductory Text for the 21st Century 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This was a book I had to use for a criminal justice course I was taking. Any more you can ask someone a question about a trail going on in their town or nationally and all of a sudden you have a 30 minute conversation about what should happen to the individual and also what the defense position should be and how the prosecutor should approach the trial. There are also all types of shows on television that give individuals a perception of how the legal system works. Sadly this is television where shows are made for entertainment and not how the legal system really works. With the ever changing legal system and challenges to law enforcement officials this book definitely helps understand the legal system, and challenges in and outside the legal system. It also helps you understand that the criminal justice system and ways to fight crime is not a science and there is not necessarily a formula that will work in all parts of the country. What may work in inner cities may not work in rural areas. The foundations are the same however the structure built on the foundation will differ. This book starts out by providing the reader with Crime in America. It explores a brief history of crime in America and then takes a look at criminal justice system and its functions. Understanding how the system works and is structured will give an individual more insight as to why things happen during trials. It will open your eyes as to what is reality versus what we perceive. You will also look at the various theories associated with criminal behavior and help you understand what agencies are doing to face and fight criminal behavior. Part two looks at policing, its history and structure, purpose and organization, legal aspects and the issues and challenges of policing. Part three takes one through adjudication. It looks atthe courts; structure and participants, pretrial activities and the criminal trial, and sentencing. Part four looks at corrections dealing with probation, parole, and community corrections. It provides information on prisons, jails and looks at prison life for those incarcerated. Part five looks at special issues. It covers juvenile justice and most find this area very interesting because juvenile crimes continue to grow especially those involving violent crimes. The chapter also covers drugs and crime, terrorism and multinational criminal justice, and the future of criminal justice. This book was full of helpful information. It dispels a lot of myths about what one thinks they know about the legal system and shows them what it is really like. Television provides one with what is called “The CSI Effect.” The CSI effect, also known as the CSI syndrome and the CSI infection, is any of several ways in which the exaggerated portrayal of forensic science on crime television shows such as CSI: Crime Scene Investigation influences public perception. The term most often refers to the belief that jurors have come to demand more forensic evidence in criminal trials, thereby raising the effective standard of proof for prosecutors. While this belief is widely held among American legal professionals, some studies have suggested that crime shows are unlikely to cause such an effect, although frequent CSI viewers may place a lower value on circumstantial evidence. As technology improves and becomes more prevalent throughout society, people may also develop higher expectations for the capab