Overview

In 1911 some of D.H. Lawrence's poems and his story Odour of Chrysanthemums found their way, without his knowledge, to the desk of the editor of the English Review, Ford Madox Hueffer (later Ford). Ford was astonished and invited Lawrence to meet him, which the poet did with superb reluctance. Ford reinvents the meeting in 1937, recalling how, 'He had come, like the fox, with his overflood of energy - his abounding vitality of passionate determination that seemed always too big for his frail body.' Ford included ...
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Critical Essays of Ford Madox Ford

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Overview

In 1911 some of D.H. Lawrence's poems and his story Odour of Chrysanthemums found their way, without his knowledge, to the desk of the editor of the English Review, Ford Madox Hueffer (later Ford). Ford was astonished and invited Lawrence to meet him, which the poet did with superb reluctance. Ford reinvents the meeting in 1937, recalling how, 'He had come, like the fox, with his overflood of energy - his abounding vitality of passionate determination that seemed always too big for his frail body.' Ford included the work in the English Review, talked up the new writer, and handed on his first novel, The White Peacock, to Messrs Heinemann. It is hard to understate the impact that Ford had on the literature of his age. His work as a magazine editor alone ensures him a place in the annals of Modernism; his patronage, his successful as much as his squandered aid - to Lawrence, Wyndham Lewis, Hudson, Pound, Conrad, Joyce, Stein, early Hemingway, Cummings, Rhys and others remembered and forgotten - is a huge chapter of literary history. As well as being an enabler, he was also a great critic, with the ability to read the present and re-read the past with independent vision. Series Editor: Bill Hutchings
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781847776921
  • Publisher: Carcanet Press, Limited
  • Publication date: 4/1/2002
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 320
  • File size: 749 KB

Meet the Author

Ford Madox Ford, born Ford Hermann Hueffer, was born in 1873 in Surrey, England. He collaborated with Joseph Conrad on The Inheritors and other books, and prolifically published poetry, criticism, and fiction throughout his lifetime. He founded the English Review in 1908 and later edited the Transatlantic Review, publishing Joyce, Hemingway, and Pound, among others. He died in 1939.

Max Saunders is Professor of English at King's College London, where he teaches nineteenth- and twentieth-century British, American and European literature. He is the author of the two-volume Ford Madox Ford: A Dual Life and the editor of Ford's Selected Poems and War Prose, also available from NYU Press.

Richard Stang is professor emeritus of Washington University in St. Louis. His books include The Theory of the Novel in England and Discussions of George Eliot.

Richard Stang is professor emeritus of Washington University in St. Louis. His books include The Theory of the Novel in England and Discussions of George Eliot.

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Table of Contents

Introduction
The evolution of a lyric (1899) 1
Creative history and historic sense (1903-4) 4
The collected poems of Christina Rossetti (1904) 15
A literary causerie : on some tendencies of modern verse (1905; on Sturge Moore) 28
Literary portraits from The Tribune
III. Mr. John Galsworthy (1907) 33
VIII. Mr. Joseph Conrad (1907) 36
[X, but says VIII], Maxim Gorky (1907) 39
IX [sic should be XI]. Mr. Dion Clayton Calthrop (1907) 43
XIV. Mr. Maurice Hewlett (1907) 46
From XXIII. The year 1907 49
XXIV. The year 1908 49
XXVII. Mr. Charles Doughty (1908) 52
Shylock as Mr. Tree (1908) 56
Essays from The English Review
The unemployed (1908) 59
Review of George Saintsbury, A history of English prosody (1909) 62
The work of W. H. Hudson (1909) 65
Algernon Charles Swinburne (1909) 71
George Meredith OM (1909) 72
Review of C.F.G. Masterman, The condition of England (1909) 73
Joseph Conrad (1911) 76
D.G.R. (1911) 91
Essays from The Bystander
A Tory plea for home rule (2 articles; 1911) 98
Pan and pantomime (on Shaw; 1912) 106
Literary portraits and other essays from The Outlook
I. Mr. Compton Mackenzie and Sinister Street (1913) 110
VI. Mr. John Galsworthy and The dark flower (1913) 114
VII. Mr. Percival Gibbon and The second-class passenger (1913) 118
XII. Herr Arthur Schnitzler and Bertha Garlan (1913) 122
XXIII. Fydor Dostoevsky and The idiot (1914) 126
XXV. Monsignor Benson and Initiation (1914) 129
XXVI. Miss Amber Reeves and A lady and her husband (1914) 133
XXVIII. Mr. Morley Roberts and Time and Thomas Waring (1914) 137
XXXI. Lord Dunsany and Five plays (1914) 142
XXXIV. Miss May Sinclair and The judgment of Eve (1914) 146
XXXV. Les Jeunes and Des Imagistes (1914) 150
XXXVI. Les Jeunes and Des Imagistes (second notice) (1914) 154
XXXVIII. Mr. W. H. Mallock and Social Reform (1914) 159
XXXIX. Mr. W. B. Yeats and his new poems (1914) 163
XLII. Mr. Robert Frost and North of Boston (1914) 167
France, 1915 (continued) (1915) 170
Sologub and Artzibashef (1915) 173
A jubilee (review of Some imagist poets) (1915) 178
On a notice of Blast (1915) 182
'Thus to revisit'. Piccadilly Review (1919)
I. The Novel (Gilbert Cannan, Time and eternity; Virginia Woolf, Night and day) 186
II. The realistic novel (Dostoevsky, An honest thief; George Stevenson, Bengy) 190
III. The serious books (Max Beerbohm, Seven men; W. H. Hudson, Birds in town and village) 192
V. Biography and criticism (Henry Festing Jones, Samuel Butler, Wyndham Lewis, The caliph's design) 197
Letter to the editor of The Athenaeum (1920) 203
An answer to 'three questions' (1922) 206
A haughty and proud generation (1922) 208
Ulysses and the handling of indecencies (1922) 218
Mr. Conrad's writing (1923) 228
Literary causeries from the Chicago Tribune Sunday Magazine
II. Vill Loomyare (1924) 232
III. And the French (1924) 233
VIII. So she went into the garden ... (on Joyce; 1924) 235
Essays from The Transatlantic Review (1924)
Stocktaking : Towards a revaluation of English literature
II. Axioms and internationalisms 241
[III. but headed] II. (continued) 243
IV. Intelligentsia 248
IX. The serious book (continued) 254
X. The reader 261
From a Paris quay (II) (1925) 269
The other house (review of Jean-Aubry's Joseph Conrad; 1927) 272
Cambridge on the Caboodle (on forster; 1927) 276
Thomas Hardy, OM Obiit 11 January 1928 282
Elizabeth Madox Roberts by Ford Madox Ford (1928) 285
On Conrad's vocabulary (1928) 288
Review of Josephine Herbst, Nothing is sacred (1928) 292
Review of Sinclair Lewis, Dodsworth (1929) 294
Mediterranean reverie (on Pound; 1933) 296
Hands off the arts (1935) 300
Men and books (on Conrad; 1936) 309
Observations on technique (1937) 312
Ralston Crawford's pictures (1937) 314
The flame in stone (on Louise Bogan; 1937) 316
None shall look back (on Caroline Gordon; 1937) 319
Statement on the Spanish War (1937) 321
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