Critical Strategies for Academic Thinking and Writing: A Text with Readings / Edition 3

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Overview

Critical Strategies for Academic Thinking and Writing, Third Edition, is a text and reader that gets to the heart of what is so essential for success in college but is so hard for students to develop. Based on years of research on the reading and writing demands of the college curriculum, Critical Strategies teaches students the six thinking and writing strategies necessary for college-level work in any discipline and gives them practice with the kinds of material they'll use in their other college courses. Edited by Mal Kiniry and by Mike Rose, one of the most well known figures in composition studies, the streamlined third edition gives students more help and guidance to develop competence and confidence with academic work.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780312115616
  • Publisher: Bedford/St. Martin's
  • Publication date: 12/28/1997
  • Edition description: Third Edition
  • Edition number: 3
  • Pages: 737
  • Product dimensions: 6.46 (w) x 9.20 (h) x 1.06 (d)

Meet the Author

MALCOLM KINIRY is director of writing at Rutgers University, Newark, and has written articles on basic writing, writing across the curriculum, and curriculum development, as well as Renaissance studies. He taught in the UCLA Writing Program for seven years and is currently working on a language reader for composition courses.

MIKE ROSE, a professor in the Graduate School of Education and Information Studies at the University of California, Los Angeles, is one of the most prominent names in composition studies. He has produced important work in remedial reading and writing, writing across the curriculum, the cognition of composing, and the politics of literacy. Among his books are Lives on the Boundary: The Struggles and Achievements of America's Underprepared (1989) andPossible Lives: The Promise of Public Education in America (1995). He has received numerous awards for his work in language and literacy, including awards from the National Academy of Education, the National Council of Teachers of English, the Modern Language Association, and the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation. Both in 1991 and 1992 he, as coauthor, won the prestigious Richard Braddock Award for the outstanding article published each year in College Composition and Communication. His most recent award is the 1997 Grawemeyer Award in Education for Possible Lives.

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Table of Contents

Preface for Instructors
Introduction for Students: Critical Strategies for Academic Situations

PART I. DEFINING: NEGOTIATING MEANINGS
Defining across the Curriculum
Opening Problem: Defining Intelligence
Howard Gardner, Frames of Mind: The Theory of Multiple Intelligences
Working Examples
A Working Example Using the Word Model
Working Examples from Political Science
A Professional Application
Daniel Goleman, From Emotional Intelligence: When Smart Is Dumb
Assignments
A Language Assignment
A Word History Assignment
A Personal Essay Assignment
A Biology Assignment
A Psychology Assignment
A Genetics Assignment
A History Assignment
An Ecology Assignment
Readings: Reconsidering Intelligence
Douglas Harper, From Working Knowledge: Skill and Community in a Small Shop
Deborah Franklin, The Shape of Life
Mike Rose, From Possible Lives: The Promise of Public Education in America
Edward Hutchins, From "The Social Organization of Distributed Cognition"
John Haugeland, From Artificial Intelligence: The Very Idea
Further Assignments

PART II. SUMMARIZING: SYNTHESIS AND JUDGMENT
Summarizing across the Curriculum
Opening Problem: Summarizing Trends in Child Poverty
Jonathan Marshall, Child Poverty Is Abundant
Working Examples
A Working Example from Psychology
A Working Example from Sociology
A Working Example from Folklore
A Professional Application
Ellen Israel Rosen, The New International Division of Labor
Assignments
An Anthropology Assignment
A Biology Assignment
An Oral History Assignment
An Anthropology Assignment
An Economics Assignment
A Literature Assignment
A Composition Assignment
Readings: The Dimensions of Child Poverty
Arloc Sherman (for the Children's Defense Fund), From Wasting America's Future: The Children's Defense Fund Report on the Costs of Child Poverty
Duncan Lindsey, From The Welfare of Children
Michael B. Katz, Poverty
Melanie Scheller, On the Meaning of Plumbing and Poverty
Lisbeth B. Schorr, The Lessons of Successful Programs
Further Assignments

PART III. SERIALIZING: ESTABLISHING SEQUENCE
Serializing across the Curriculum
Opening Problem: Constructing a Serial Account
Jim Fisher, The Lindbergh Case
Working Examples
A Working Example from Biology
Working Examples from Literature
Working Examples from History
A Professional Application
Patricia J. Williams, From The Alchemy of Race and Rights
Assignments
A Geography Assignment
A Criminal Studies Assignment
A Literature Assignment
A Biology Assignment
A History Assignment
An Astronomy Assignment
A Geology Assignment
Readings: Crime Stories: Constructing Guilt and Innocence
Mark Singer, Profile of Filmmaker Errol Morris
Carl Bernstein and Bob Woodward, From All the President's Men
Renee Loth, Woburn, Science, and the Law
Helen Benedict, From Virgin or Vamp: How the Press Covers Sex Crimes
W. Lance Bennett and Martha S. Feldman, From Reconstructing Reality in the Courtroom: Justice and Judgment in American Culture
Further Assignments

PART IV. CLASSIFYING: CREATING AND EVALUATING CATEGORIES
Classifying across the Curriculum
Opening Problem: Classifying Characteristics of Immigration to the United States
Tables and Charts on Immigration to the United States, 1820-1990
Working Examples
A Working Example from Sociology
A Working Example from Public Health
A Professional Application
David Cole, Five Myths about Immigration
Assignments
A Psychology Assignment
A Composition Assignment
An Anthropology Assignment
An Art Assignment
A Biology Assignment
A Sociology Assignment
A Literature Assignment
A Linguistics Assignment
Readings: U.S. Immigration Patterns
Reed Ueda, The Historical Context of Immigration
Maldwyn Allen Jones, From American Immigration
Eugene Boe, From Pioneers to Eternity: Norwegians on the Prairie
Elizabeth Ewen, From Immigrant Women in the Land of Dollars: Life and Culture on the Lower East Side, 1890-1925
George J. Sánchez, From Becoming Mexican American: Ethnicity, Culture, and Identity in Chicano Los Angeles, 1900-1945
Alejandro Portes and Rubén G. Rumbaut, From Immigrant America: A Portrait
Further Assignments

PART V. COMPARING: ASSESSING SIMILARITIES AND DIFFERENCES
Comparing across the Curriculum
Opening Problem: Comparing Two Primatologists
Francine Patterson, Conversations with a Gorilla
Dian Fossey, More Years with Mountain Gorillas
Working Examples
A Working Example from the History of Science
A Working Example from American History
A Professional Application
Bruce Bower, Probing Primate Thoughts
Assignments
A Literature Assignment
An Anthropology Assignment
An Education Assignment
A History Assignment
A Literature Assignment
A Science Assignment
Readings: Methods of Inquiry in Primate Research
Herbert Terrace, How Nim Chimpsky Changed My Mind
Roger Lewin, Look Who's Talking Now
Deborah Blum, The Black Box
Deborah Blum, Not a Nice Death
Dorothy L. Cheney and Robert M. Seyfarth, From How Monkeys See the World: Inside the Mind of Another Species
John C. Mitani, From "Ethological Studies of Chimpanzee Vocal Behavior"
Further Assignments

PART VI. ANALYZING: PERSPECTIVES FOR INTERPRETATION
Analyzing across the Curriculum
Opening Problem: Analyzing a Short Story
Olive Senior, The Two Grandmothers
Merle Hodge, Challenges of the Struggle for Sovereignty: Changing the World versus Writing Short Stories
Working Examples
A Working Example from Psychology
A Working Example from Biology
A Working Example from Political Science
A Professional Application
Catherine A. Sunshine, From The Caribbean: Survival, Struggle, and Sovereignty
Assignments
A Psychology Assignment
An Education Assignment
An Economics Assignment
A Science Assignment
A Literature Assignment
A Sociology Assignment
Readings: Caribbean Literature and Cultural Politics
Edward Kamau Brathwaite, Nation Language
Merle Hodge, From Crick Crack Monkey
Catherine A. Sunshine, From The Caribbean: Survival, Struggle, and Sovereignty
Michelle Cliff, From Abeng
Jamaica Kincaid, From A Small Place
Roger McTair, Visiting
Further Assignments

APPENDIX: ASSIGNMENTS FOR FIELD STUDY
Assignment 1: Greeting Behavior of College Students
Assignment 2: Defining Literacy
Assignment 3: What's Funny?
Assignment 4: Exploring the Discourse of Your Major
Perspectives for Exploring the Discourse of Your Major
Optional Readings: Complicating the Issues
Michael Moffatt, Vocationalism and the Curriculum
Elizabeth Chiseri-Strater, Gender, Language, and Pedagogy
Howard S. Becker, If You Want to Be a Scholar
David R. Russell, Academic Discourse: Community or Communities?
Lynne V. Cheney, Tyrannical Machines
Ernest Boyer, The Enriched Major
Raymond J. Rodrigues, Rethinking the Cultures of Disciplines
Lisa Guernsey, Scholars Debate the Pros and Cons of Anonymity in Internet Discussions
Further Assignments for Exploring the Discourse of Your Major
Index of Authors and Titles

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