The Critique Of Pure Reason

The Critique Of Pure Reason

3.8 17
by Immanuel Kant
     
 

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The Critique of Pure Reason is one of the most influential philosophy books of all times. Kant's influence on modern perception of reason cannot be over estimated. Here Kant redefines reason and gives us the tools to understand reason on two levels: the empirical and the metaphysical.  See more details below

Overview

The Critique of Pure Reason is one of the most influential philosophy books of all times. Kant's influence on modern perception of reason cannot be over estimated. Here Kant redefines reason and gives us the tools to understand reason on two levels: the empirical and the metaphysical.

Editorial Reviews

Kenneth R. Winkle
Eric Watkins has done a fine job of abridging the Critique to a manageable size while preserving those sections most often assigned in a survey course, including enough of the Analytic to provide a continuous argument. Students will get a good sense of the whole from the parts he includes. I recommend it enthusiastically.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781604592740
Publisher:
Wilder Publications
Publication date:
03/17/2008
Pages:
384
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.85(d)

Meet the Author

Norman Kemp Smith (1872-1958) lectured at Princeton and was Professor of Logic and Metaphysics in the University of Edinburgh.

Howard Caygill is Professor at Goldsmiths College, University of London.

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Critique of Pure Reason 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 17 reviews.
Anonymous 9 months ago
Learn about why you might think the way you do, and how ethics and reasoning may pave the way. Standard text for college ethics and philosophy classes
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is meant to be read by all.
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davidjoho More than 1 year ago
The book itself is a classic, of course. But the poor quality of the character recognition makes this difficult to read. On the other hand, it's free.