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Critique of Pure Reason (Norman Kemp Smith translation) / Edition 1
     

Critique of Pure Reason (Norman Kemp Smith translation) / Edition 1

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by Immanuel Kant, Norman K. Smith
 

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ISBN-10: 0312450109

ISBN-13: 9780312450106

Pub. Date: 01/28/1929

Publisher: St. Martin's Press

This entirely new translation of Critique of Pure Reason is the most accurate and informative English translation ever produced of this epochal philosophical text. Though its simple, direct style will make it suitable for all new readers of Kant, the translation displays a philosophical and textual sophistication that will enlighten Kant scholars as well. This

Overview

This entirely new translation of Critique of Pure Reason is the most accurate and informative English translation ever produced of this epochal philosophical text. Though its simple, direct style will make it suitable for all new readers of Kant, the translation displays a philosophical and textual sophistication that will enlighten Kant scholars as well. This translation recreates as far as possible a text with the same interpretative nuances and richness as the original.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780312450106
Publisher:
St. Martin's Press
Publication date:
01/28/1929
Series:
Great Books in Philosophy
Pages:
669
Product dimensions:
5.45(w) x 8.26(h) x 1.34(d)

Table of Contents

TITLE PAGE OF FIRST EDITION (in replica) 1(2)
TITLE PAGE OF SECOND EDITION (not in replica) 3(1)
MOTTO 4(1)
DEDICATION 5(2)
PREFACE TO FIRST EDITION 7(10)
PREFACE TO SECOND EDITION 17(22)
TABLE OF CONTENTS OF FIRST EDITION
39(2)
INTRODUCTION 41(1)
I. The Distinction between Pure and Empirical Knowledge
41(2)
II. We are in possession of certain Modes of a priori Knowledge, and even the Common Understanding is never without them
43(2)
III. Philosophy stands in need of a Science to determine the Possibility, the Principles, and the Extent of all a priori Knowledge
45(3)
IV. The Distinction between Analytic and Synthetic Judgments
48(4)
V. In all Theoretical Sciences of Reason Synthetic a priori Judgments are contained as Principles
52(3)
VI. The General Problem of Pure Reason
55(3)
VII. The Idea and Division of a Special Science, under the title "Critique of Pure Reason"
58(7)
I. TRANSCENDENTAL DOCTRINE OF ELEMENTS 65(508)
FIRST PART. TRANSCENDENTAL AESTHETIC 65(27)
Introduction 65(2)
Section I. Space
67(7)
Section 2. Time
74(8)
General Observations on the Transcendental Aesthetic
82(10)
SECOND PART. TRANSCENDENTAL LOGIC 92(481)
Introduction. Idea of a Transcendental Logic 92(1)
I. Logic in General
92(3)
II. Transcendental Logic
95(2)
III. The Division of General Logic into Analytic and Dialectic
97(3)
IV. The Division of Transcendental Logic into Transcendental Analytic and Dialectic
100(2)
FIRST DIVISION. TRANSCENDENTAL ANALYTIC 102(195)
Book I. Analytic of Concepts 103(73)
Chapter I. The Clue to the Discovery of all Pure Concepts of the Understanding
104(16)
Section 1. The Logical Employment of the Understanding in general
105(1)
Section 2. The Logical Function of the Understanding in Judgments
106(5)
Section 3. The Pure Concepts of the Understanding, or Categories
111(9)
Chapter II. The Deduction of the Pure Concepts of Understanding
120(56)
Section 1. The Principles of any Transcendental Deduction
120(9)
Transition to the Transcendental Deduction of the Categories
125(4)
Section 2. Transcendental Deduction of the Pure Concepts of Understanding
129(47)
Deduction as in First Edition
129(22)
Deduction as in Second Edition
151(25)
Book II. Analytic of Principles 176(121)
Introduction. Transcendental Judgment in General 177(3)
Chapter I. The Schematism of the Pure Concepts of Understanding
180(8)
Chapter II. System of all Principles of Pure Understanding
188(69)
Section 1. The Highest Principle of all Analytic Judgments
189(2)
Section 2. The Highest Principle of all Synthetic Judgments
191(3)
Section 3. Systematic Representation of all the Synthetic Principles of Pure Understanding
194(63)
1. Axioms of Intuition
197(4)
2. Anticipations of Perception
201(7)
3. Analogies of Experience
208(4)
First Analogy. Principle of Permanence of Substance
212(6)
Second Analogy. Principle of Succession in Time, in accordance with the Law of Causality
218(15)
Third Analogy. Principle of Coexistence, in accordance with the Law of Reciprocity or Community
233(6)
4. The Postulates of Empirical Thought in general
239(5)
Refutation of Idealism
244(8)
General Note on the System of the Principles
252(5)
Chapter III. The Ground of the Distinction of all Objects in general into Phenomena and Noumena
257(19)
Appendix. The Amphiboly of Concepts of Reflection
276(21)
Note to the Amphiboly of Concepts of Reflection
281(16)
SECOND DIVISION. TRANSCENDENTAL DIALECTIC 297(276)
Introduction 297(1)
I. Transcendental Illusion 297(3)
II. Pure Reason as the Seat of Transcendental Illusion 300(8)
A. Reason in General 300(3)
B. The Logical Employment of Reason 303(2)
C. The Pure Employment of Reason 305(3)
Book I. The Concepts of Pure Reason 308(19)
Section 1. The Ideas in General
309(6)
Section 2. The Transcendental Ideas
315(7)
Section 3. System of the Transcendental Ideas
322(5)
Book II. The Dialectical Inferences of Pure Reason 327(246)
Chapter I. The Paralogisms of Pure Reason
328(56)
The Paralogisms as in First Edition
333(35)
The Paralogisms as in Second Edition
368(16)
Chapter II. The Antinomy of Pure Reason
384(101)
Section 1. System of Cosmological Ideas
386(7)
Section 2. Antithetic of Pure Reason
393(29)
First Antinomy
396(6)
Second Antinomy
402(7)
Third Antinomy
409(6)
Fourth Antinomy
415(7)
Section 3. The Interest of Reason in these Conflicts
422(8)
Section 4. The Absolute Necessity of a Solution of the Transcendental Problems of Pure Reason
430(6)
Section 5. Sceptical Representation of the Cosmological Questions in the Four Transcendental Ideas
436(3)
Section 6. Transcendental Idealism as the Key to the Solution of the Cosmological Dialectic
439(4)
Section 7. Critical Solution of the Cosmological Conflict of Reason with itself
443(6)
Section 8. The Regulative Principle of Pure Reason in its application to the Cosmological Ideas
449(5)
Section 9. The Empirical Employment of the Regulative Principle of Reason, in respect of all Cosmological Ideas
454(29)
I. Solution of the Cosmological Idea of the Totality of the Composition of the Appearances of a Cosmic Whole
455(4)
II. Solution of the Cosmological Idea of the Totality of Division of a Whole given in Intuition
459(2)
Concluding Note and Preliminary Observation
461(3)
III. Solution of the Cosmological Idea of Totality in the Derivation of Cosmical Events from their Causes
464(3)
Possibility of Causality through Freedom
467(2)
Explanation of the Cosmological Idea of Freedom
469(10)
IV. Solution of the Cosmological Idea of the Totality of the Dependence of Appearances as regards their Existence in general
479(4)
Concluding Note on the whole Antinomy of Pure Reason
483(2)
Chapter III. The Ideal of Pure Reason
485(88)
Section 1. The Ideal in general
485(2)
Section 2. The Transcendental Ideal
487(8)
Section 3. The Arguments of Speculative Reason in Proof of the Existence of a Supreme Being
495(5)
Section 4. The Impossibility of an Ontological Proof of the Existence of God
500(7)
Section 5. The Impossibility of a Cosmological Proof of the Existence of God
507(11)
Discovery and Explanation of the Dialectical Illusion in all Transcendental Proofs of the Existence of a Necessary Being
514(4)
Section 6. The Impossibility of the Physico-theological Proof
518(7)
Section 7. Critique of all Theology based upon Speculative Principles of Reason
525(7)
Appendix to the Transcendental Dialectic
532(41)
The Regulative Employment of the Ideas of Pure Reason
532(17)
The Final Purpose of the Natural Dialectic of Human Reason
549(24)
II. TRANSCENDENTAL DOCTRINE OF METHOD 573(98)
Introduction 573(1)
Chapter I. The Discipline of Pure Reason
574(55)
Section 1. The Discipline of Pure Reason in its Dogmatic Employment
576(17)
Section 2. The Discipline of Pure Reason in respect of its Polemical Employment
593(19)
Impossibility of a Sceptical Satisfaction of the Pure Reason that is in Conflict with itself
605(7)
Section 3. The Discipline of Pure Reason in respect of Hypotheses
612(9)
Section 4. The Discipline of Pure Reason in respect of its Proofs
621(8)
Chapter II. The Canon of Pure Reason
629(24)
Section 1. The Ultimate End of the Pure Employment of our Reason
630(5)
Section 2. The Ideal of the Highest Good, as a Determining Ground of the Ultimate End of Pure Reason
635(10)
Section 3. Opining, Knowing, and Believing
645(8)
Chapter III. The Architectonic of Pure Reason
653(13)
Chapter IV. The History of Pure Reason
666(5)
Index 671

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Critique of Pure Reason (Abridged) 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Anyone who is interested in Philosophy needs to read Kant's Critique of Pure Reason. Why do I make this demand? Because you will marvel at learning about the ideality of space and time, and how the world conforms to our ways of knowing, and not vice-versa. Sure, you might not believe Kant, or agree with his arguments, but, the intellectual pleasure that you will receive from this work will last your entire life. A pleasure that will resonate within you every moment you look at the stars showing themselves serenely, at a clock that makes you wonder if this hand really moves, or at the sea sad and salty, wondering, if what happened yesterday really happens tomorrow at the same time as today. However, the most important thing about Kant is that it will prepare you for Schopenhauer, and a better understanding of his view that the world (noumena) is will, and how he comes to that conclusion despite Kant's skepticism at ever having knowledge of the thing-in-itself.
Guest More than 1 year ago
For intellectual exercise, you will be hard pressed to find a more challenging read. Kant, a popular German professor and lecturer strives to prove through logic the differences and existence of 2 kinds of knowledge: 1) knowledge gained from experience~a posteriori and 2) knowledge not gained through experience~ a priori and it is on the second kind that he focuses his proofs.