Crocheting Teddy Bears: 16 Designs for Toys

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Overview

Appealing teddy bears in 16 easy-to-follow projects for crochet include Panda Bear, British Bear, Goldilocks and The Three Bears, and 10 other huggable bruins. Helpful illustrations and photographs complement expert crochet instructions. Includes clothing patterns, conversion charts, crochet abbreviations. 11 black-and-white photographs.

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Overview

Appealing teddy bears in 16 easy-to-follow projects for crochet include Panda Bear, British Bear, Goldilocks and The Three Bears, and 10 other huggable bruins. Helpful illustrations and photographs complement expert crochet instructions. Includes clothing patterns, conversion charts, crochet abbreviations. 11 black-and-white photographs.

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Crocheting Teddy Bears

16 Designs for Toys


By Barbara Jacksier, Ruth Jacksier

Dover Publications, Inc.

Copyright © 1984 Barbara Jacksier and Ruth Jacksier
All rights reserved.
ISBN: 978-0-486-15806-8



CHAPTER 1

CROCHET INSTRUCTIONS

SLIP KNOT

Grasp the loose end of the yam with your left hand and make an "O" with the yarn leading from the ball (the ball of yarn should be hanging behind the "O"). Pinch the top of the "O" between the thumb and middle finger of your left hand, and hold your crochet hook in your right hand as you would hold a pencil. Insert the tip of the hook and bring a loop from the yarn ball through the "O" (fig. 1). Tighten the loop to complete the slip knot (fig. 2). You are now ready to make your first chain stitch (remember that the loop on your hook never counts when you are counting the stitches in your work).


CHAIN STITCH

Pinch the base of the slip knot between the thumb and middle finger of your left hand, and wind the yam from the ball from back to front over your forefinger. With the crochet hook inserted in the slip knot and the tip of the hook curved toward you, wrap the yarn around the hook from back to front (fig. 3))—this is called a yarn-over. Pull the yam through the loop on the hook to complete the first chain stitch. Yarn-over again and pull through the loop on the hook the number of times specified (fig. 4)). Each chain (and later each single crochet or other stitch) forms a distinct oval that can be clearly seen from the top of the work.


SINGLE CROCHET

Make a foundation chain of the required number of stitches (remember that the loop on the hook does not count as a stitch and that, for single crochet, you will need one chain for each stitch you want to make plus one additional chain for turning). Keeping the yarn from the ball wrapped from back to front over your left forefinger, begin the first single crochet stitch by inserting the hook from front to back in the second chain from the hook, taking care to push the hook through the center of the oval (fig. 5). Then yarn-over—that is, bring the yam over the hook from back to front (fig. 6)—and pull the yam through the stitch. You now have two loops on the hook (fig. 7). Yarn-over again (fig. 8) and pull the yam through both loops on the hook to complete the first single crochet stitch (fig. 9). You now have only one loop left on the hook and are ready to begin the next stitch. Repeat the procedure until you have worked one single crochet stitch in each stitch of the foundation chain. Unless the pattern instructions specify otherwise, at the end of the first row and of each succeeding single crochet row, make one chain stitch (fig. 10) and then turn the work so the yarn from the ball is once again at the right edge. For succeeding rows of single crochet, unless the pattern instructions specifically tell you to do otherwise, always make the first stitch of a row in the last single crochet stitch of the previous row (that is, in the second stitch from the hook), not in the turning chain; and work each stitch by inserting the hook under both strands that form the oval of the stitch of the previous row (fig. 11).


HALF DOUBLE CROCHET

Make a foundation chain of the required number of stitches (remember that the loop on the hook does not count as a stitch and that, for half double crochet, you will need one chain for each stitch you want to make plus two additional chains for turning). To begin the first half double crochet stitch, first make sure that the yam from the ball is wrapped from back to front over your left forefinger. Then yarn-over (bring the yam over the hook from back to front) and insert the hook from front to back in the third chain from the hook, taking care to push the hook through the center of the oval (fig. 12). Yarn-over again and pull the yam through the stitch. You now have three loops on the hook (fig. 13). Yarn-over once more and pull the yam through all three loops on the hook to complete the first half double crochet stitch (fig. 14). You now have only one loop left on the hook and are ready to begin the next stitch. Repeat the procedure until you have worked one half double crochet stitch in each stitch of the foundation chain. Unless the pattern instructions specify otherwise, at the end of the first row and of each succeeding half double crochet row, make two chain stitches and then turn the work so the yam from the ball is once again at the right edge. For succeeding rows of half double crochet, unless the instructions specifically tell you to do otherwise, always make the first stitch of a row in the last half double crochet stitch of the previous row (that is, in the third stitch from the hook), not in the turning chain; and work each stitch by inserting the hook under both strands that form the oval of the stitch of the previous row.


DOUBLE CROCHET

Make a foundation chain of the required number of stitches (remember that the loop on the hook does not count as a stitch and that, for double crochet, you will need one chain for each stitch you want to make plus three additional chains for turning). To begin the first double crochet stitch, first make sure that the yam from the ball is wrapped from back to front over your left forefinger. Then yam-over (bring the yam over the hook from back to front) and insert the hook from front to back in the fourth chain from the hook, taking care to push the hook through the center of the oval (fig. 15). Yarn-over again and pull the yarn through the stitch. You now have three loops on the hook (fig. 16). Yarn-over again and pull the yam through the first two loops on the hook. You now have two loops left on the hook (fig. 17). Yarn-over once more and pull the yam through both of the loops on the hook to complete the first double crochet stitch (fig. 18). You now have only one loop left on the hook and are ready to begin the next stitch. Repeat the procedure until you have worked one double crochet stitch in each stitch of the foundation chain. Unless the pattern instructions specify otherwise, at the end of the first row and of each succeeding double crochet row, make three chain stitches and then turn the work so the yarn from the ball is once again at the right edge. For succeeding rows of double crochet, unless the instructions specifically tell you to do otherwise, always make the first stitch of a row in the last double crochet stitch of the previous row (that is, in the fourth stitch from the hook), not in the turning chain; and work each stitch by inserting the hook under both strands that form the oval of the stitch of the previous row.


SLIP STITCH

Insert the hook in a stitch, yarn-over and then pull the yam through both the stitch and the loop on the hook in one motion ((fig. 19). Slip stitch is similar to single crochet, but you do not yarn-over a second time before pulling the yam through the loop on the hook. It is an important utility stitch and is used, for example, to join the ends of a foundation chain to form a ring (fig. 20), to smoothly finish the edge of a piece worked in rounds and to work across an edge without adding appreciable height to the piece.


LOOP STITCH

This stitch is a decorative variation of single crochet, but it uses much more yam and is always worked in patterns that alternate one row or round of loop stitch with at least one row or round of some other stitch—usually plain single crochet or half double crochet. Because the loops are formed on the back of the piece (the side facing away from you as you work), loop stitch is always worked from the wrong side so that the loops will appear on the right side of the finished piece. Thus, when working in rows, you will always work the loop stitch on the wrong-side rows and the other stitch of the pattern on the right-side rows. When working in rounds, the entire pattern is generally worked from the wrong side.

To practice the loop stitch, first make a foundation chain of the desired length and work one row of single crochet or half double crochet; then chain one stitch and turn the piece so the yam from the ball is once again at the right edge. The next row will be worked in loop stitch. With the yam from the ball wrapped from back to front over your left forefinger, begin the first loop stitch by inserting the hook under both strands of the second stitch from the hook as you would for single crochet (see fig. 11). To form the loop, swing the hook behind both of the strands on your forefinger (hold the finger close to the edge of the piece if you want a small loop and further away from the edge if you prefer a longer loop), catch the back strand with the tip of the hook (fig. 21), and then pull both strands through the stitch. You now have a loop around your forefinger and three loops on the hook (fig. 22). Yarn-over again (fig. 23) and pull the yam through all three loops on the hook to complete the stitch (fig. 24). Tug the loop on your forefinger to tighten it and then remove your finger from the loop. You now have only one loop left on your hook and are ready to begin the next stitch. Repeat the procedure, taking care to make each loop the same length as the preceding one, until you have worked one loop stitch in each stitch across the row. Unless the pattern instructions specify otherwise, chain one stitch and turn the piece to the right side—you will now be able to see the finished loops of the row you have just completed (fig. 25); then work the next row in single crochet or half double crochet, as specified by the project directions. Continue in this manner, alternately working one loop stitch row and one single crochet or half double crochet row until you have completed the number of rows required.


WORKING IN THE BACK LOOPS

When a ribbed effect is desired, the pattern instructions will tell you to work one or more rows or rounds in the back loops only. This means that, instead of inserting the hook in the customary way under both strands that form the oval of the stitch of the previous row or round, you must insert the hook under only the back strand (the one furthest from you) of the stitch (fig. 26).


WORKING IN A CHAIN SPACE

A series of chain stitches is often used to bridge an open space—as, for example, when working a lacelike design. To crochet the next row, the pattern instructions may tell you to work across the "bridge" of chain stitches by working in the chain space rather than into the chain stitches themselves. This means that, to make each of the stitches in question, you must insert the hook into the space under the chain (fig. 27) and then work the stitch around the chain (fig. 28).


INCREASING AND DECREASING

To increase one stitch, work two stitches in the same stitch of the previous row; or work a stitch in the turning chain at the beginning or end of a row. Pattern instructions will specify which method to use.

To decrease one stitch, work two stitches together in the following way: work the first stitch until the final yam- over, but do not yarn-over; instead, begin to work the next stitch, working it also to the final yam-over; now yam-over and pull the yam through all loops on the hook.


ATTACHING NEW YARN

If you run out of yam in the course of working a piece, complete a stitch with the old yarn; then hold the new yarn against the back of the work, leaving a loose 4-inch end. Insert the hook into the next stitch to be worked, yam-over and draw a loop of the new yam through the stitch. Then finish the stitch and continue working in the usual manner, using the new yam. Hold the two yam ends along the edge of the row and work them into the next few stitches or, if you prefer, let them hang at the back of the piece and weave them in later.

To change colors in the course of working a piece, work with the first color until you are ready to work the final yam- over of the last stitch before you are to change colors. Then cut the first color, leaving a 4-inch yam end. Now hold the new color against the back of the work, leaving a loose 4-inch end, yam-over and pull a loop of the new color through all the loops on the hook to complete the stitch. Continue working in the usual manner, using the new color. Hold the yam ends along the edge of the row and work them into the next few stitches or, if you prefer, let them hang at the back of the piece and weave them in later.

When you must attach new yam along the edge of a completed piece in order to work an edging or the first row of another section of the project, hold the new yam against the back of the work, leaving a 4-inch end. Insert the hook into the edge of the piece into the stitch in which the yam is to be attached, yam-over and draw a loop through the stitch; then chain one (that is, yam-over again and draw through the loop on the hook). You are now ready to pick up and work the number of stitches specified in the project instructions. Hold the yam end along the edge of the piece and work it into the first few stitches or, if you prefer, let it hang at the back of the piece and weave it in later.


ENDING OFF

Complete the last stitch of the piece and cut the yam from the ball, leaving a 4-inch yarn end (or a yam end of the length specified in the instructions). Then draw the yam end through the remaining loop on the hook and pull tight. Thread the yam end on a large-eyed yam needle, weave it through the back of the work for about 1 inch, and trim the excess.


JOINING CROCHETED PIECES

Crocheted Seam: Pin or hold the pieces together (right or wrong sides out, as appropriate) and align the edges to be joined, matching stitches and rows as closely as possible. Hold your yam at the back of the work, insert the hook from front to back through both loops of the first pair of matching stitches, yam-over and pull a loop through to the front of the work. Insert the hook through both loops of the next pair of matching stitches, yam-over and pull a loop through the stitches and the loop on the hook. Continue working in this manner, making a slip stitch through both loops of each pair of matching stitches along the length of the edges being joined (fig. 29). Crocheting through both loops will produce a ridge on the front of the work. For a flatter seam that has the appearance of parallel lines of stitches on the front of the work, slip stitch through only the inner loops of each pair of matching stitches (fig. 30); or for a similar seam with the parallel lines on the reverse side of the work, slip stitch though the outer loops only (fig. 31).

Sewn Seam: Pin or hold the pieces together as for a crocheted seam. Thread a large-eyed yam needle with your yarn, and then work an overcast stitch through loops of each pair of matching stitches. Sew through the inner loops only if you want to produce parallel lines on the front of the work (fig. 32); stitch through the outer loops only if you want the parallel lines to appear on the reverse side of the work (fig. 33).


GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS

* (Asterisk) : This symbol indicates that the instructions immediately following are to be repeated the given number of times plus the original.

Repeat instructions in parentheses as many times as specified. For example: "(Ch 5, sc in next sc) 5 times" means to work all that is in parentheses 5 times in total.


Hook Conversion Chart

Stitch Conversion Chart

U.S. NameEquivalent

Chain
Chain
Slip
Single crochet
Single crochet
Double crochet
Half double or short- double crochet Half-treble crochet
Double crochet
Treble crochet
Treble crochet
Double-treble crochet
Double-treble crochet
Treble-treble crochet
Treble-treble or long- treble crochet Quadruple-treble crochet
Afghan stitch
Tricot crochet


CROCHET ABBREVIATIONS

ch—chain
sc—single crochet
dc—double crochet
st, sts—stitch, stitches
sl st—slip stitch
md—round
yo—yarn—over


(Continues...)

Excerpted from Crocheting Teddy Bears by Barbara Jacksier, Ruth Jacksier. Copyright © 1984 Barbara Jacksier and Ruth Jacksier. Excerpted by permission of Dover Publications, Inc..
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Table of Contents

Contents

Title Page,
Copyright Page,
INTRODUCTION,
CROCHET INSTRUCTIONS,
METRIC CONVERSION CHART - CONVERTING INCHES TO CENTIMETERS AND YARDS TO METERS,
PANDA BEAR,
SHAGGY BEAR,
BRITISH BEAR,
PINK AND BLUE BEARS,
KOALA BEAR,
POLAR BEAR,
BARNEY BEAR,
GOLDILOCKS AND THE THREE BEARS,
PREPPY BEAR,
HONEY BEAR,
ROOSEVELT BEARS,
SOURCES OF SUPPLY,

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 7, 2014

    I love teddy bears.

    I have always loved teddy bears and now i get to crochet them.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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