Crop Chemophobia: Will Precaution Kill the Green Revolution?

Overview

The Green Revolution of 1960s introduced herbicides, pesticides, and advanced agricultural technologies to third world countries-rescuing hundreds of millions of people from malnutrition and starvation and transforming low-yield, labor-intensive farming into the high-tech, immensely productive industry it is today. Despite these stunning gains, critics of chemical farming remain vocal. Recently, the European Union passed a ban on twenty-two chemicals-about 15 percent of the EU pesticides market-to begin in 2011. ...
See more details below
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (5) from $35.25   
  • New (3) from $35.25   
  • Used (2) from $58.74   
Crop Chemophobia: Will Precaution Kill the Green Revolution?

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK Study
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$22.99
BN.com price
(Save 41%)$38.99 List Price

Overview

The Green Revolution of 1960s introduced herbicides, pesticides, and advanced agricultural technologies to third world countries-rescuing hundreds of millions of people from malnutrition and starvation and transforming low-yield, labor-intensive farming into the high-tech, immensely productive industry it is today. Despite these stunning gains, critics of chemical farming remain vocal. Recently, the European Union passed a ban on twenty-two chemicals-about 15 percent of the EU pesticides market-to begin in 2011. In Crop Chemophobia, Jon Entine and his coauthors examine the "precautionary principle" that underlies the EU's decision and explore the ban's potential consequences-including environmental degradation, decreased food safety, impaired disease-control efforts, and a hungrier world.
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

CHOICE - July 2011
Science gathers objective information that is synthesized into verifiable knowledge, which is useful in predicting the probability of occurrence of particular outcomes under given sets of conditions. It is a valuable, if not the primary, resource that can narrow the uncertainty associated with various decision options arising in the course of human affairs. This book focuses on the use of the numerous herbicides and pesticides employed to protect the food supply and the associated concerns about introducing these chemicals into the environment. According to the editor and chapter authors, the emergence of the "precautionary principle" as a primary means for informing decisions fails to make sufficient use of science to form and implement public policy affecting production agriculture, human health, food security, world trade, etc. Science does not provide absolute certainty for anything, but inserting a Chicken Little or bogeyman approach as the best "better safe than sorry" way to address problems can pose even larger problems. This book presents the complex interplay among science, economics, environmental concerns, provincial interests, law, and politics in conducting human affairs, primarily from a science perspective. How these issues are addressed will affect everyone's quality of life. This work will help to inform the debate within and among societies worldwide. Recommended. All levels/libraries.
Mike Johanns
Crop Chemophobia offers a science-based consideration of the impact of agricultural technology and highlights the need to give more thought to the principles guiding the regulation of food production. This is more than an academic debate; it could save lives.
Bob Stallman
Crop Chemophobia should be required reading for policymakers. Our greatest challenge in the next forty years will be to feed billions more people on our planet with the same land resources we now use. As this important book demonstrates, we need to have science-based discussions about how to accomplish this. In the decades ahead, the greatest risk of all may be blind adherence to the precautionary principle.
Ian Denholm
By placing science about scaremongering, this book should stimulate a more infromed and balanced debate on the importance of pesticides in meeting the challenges posed by population growth an da changing climate.
Mike Adams
Many consumers today rely on sensationalized media reports to form their opinions on food production. Crop Chemophobia does an excellent job of going beyond the emotional debate over the use of crop inputs. Those concerned with a a growing world population and food insecurity should look closely at the consequences of removing a vital tool of food production.
W. Daren Coppock
Timely and important, this book is a call to action. We cannot afford to allow a narrow, technology-averse agenda to saddle our global food-production system with constraints that are costly and scientifically unwarranted—not when we face the challenge of doubling food production in the next four decades to meet expected demand.
Midwest Book Review
Pesticides and preservatives can be dangerous in excessive quality, but is the world's growing phobia putting it at odds with the benefits they bring? Crop Chemophobia: Will Precaution Kill the Green Revolution? outlines the concern with modern farming about the paranoia surrounding food safety and how too much regulation of chemicals could lead to unforeseen problems in the future of the world's food supply. Arguing for more consistent testing of pesticides and their effects on food, stating that some are banned when they pass the test clearly, Crop Chemophobia provides quite the insight on this major issue, highly recommended.
Choice
Science gathers objective information that is synthesized into verifiable knowledge, which is useful in predicting the probability of occurrence of particular outcomes under given sets of conditions. It is a valuable, if not the primary, resource that can narrow the uncertainty associated with various decision options arising in the course of human affairs. This book focuses on the use of the numerous herbicides and pesticides employed to protect the food supply and the associated concerns about introducing these chemicals into the environment. According to the editor and chapter authors, the emergence of the "precautionary principle" as a primary means for informing decisions fails to make sufficient use of science to form and implement public policy affecting production agriculture, human health, food security, world trade, etc. Science does not provide absolute certainty for anything, but inserting a Chicken Little or bogeyman approach as the best "better safe than sorry" way to address problems can pose even larger problems. This book presents the complex interplay among science, economics, environmental concerns, provincial interests, law, and politics in conducting human affairs, primarily from a science perspective. How these issues are addressed will affect everyone's quality of life. This work will help to inform the debate within and among societies worldwide. Recommended. All levels/libraries.
— July 2011
CHOICE
Science gathers objective information that is synthesized into verifiable knowledge, which is useful in predicting the probability of occurrence of particular outcomes under given sets of conditions. It is a valuable, if not the primary, resource that can narrow the uncertainty associated with various decision options arising in the course of human affairs. This book focuses on the use of the numerous herbicides and pesticides employed to protect the food supply and the associated concerns about introducing these chemicals into the environment. According to the editor and chapter authors, the emergence of the "precautionary principle" as a primary means for informing decisions fails to make sufficient use of science to form and implement public policy affecting production agriculture, human health, food security, world trade, etc. Science does not provide absolute certainty for anything, but inserting a Chicken Little or bogeyman approach as the best "better safe than sorry" way to address problems can pose even larger problems. This book presents the complex interplay among science, economics, environmental concerns, provincial interests, law, and politics in conducting human affairs, primarily from a science perspective. How these issues are addressed will affect everyone's quality of life. This work will help to inform the debate within and among societies worldwide. Recommended. All levels/libraries.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780844743615
  • Publisher: American Enterprise Institute for Public Policy Research
  • Publication date: 4/16/2011
  • Pages: 169
  • Sales rank: 1,077,366
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.70 (d)

Meet the Author

Jon Entine is a visiting scholar at the American Enterprise Institute and an adviser to Global Governance Watch, a project that examines transparency and accountability issues at the United Nations, in nongovernmental organizations, and in related international organizations.
Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

List of Illustrations
Introduction
Jon Entine
Part I: Perspective
Chapter 1: European Pesticides and Herbicides int eh Crosshairs
Euros Jones
Chapter 2: The Problems with Precaution
Jonathan H. Adler
Part II: Case Studies
Chapter 3: The Case of Atrazine
Jon Entine
Chapter 4: The Tart Cherry: Pesticides and Precaution
Mark Whalon
Chapter 5: Unintended Consequences: Dangerous Misconceptions about Public Health Insecticides, the Environment, and Human Health
Richard Tren
Part III: Precautionary Politics
Chapter 6: Precaution, Custom, and the World Trade Organization
Claude Barfield
Chapter 7: Feeding a Hungry World: Opportunity and Obligation for U.S. Agriculture
Douglas Nelson and Alexander Rinkus
Index
About the Authors
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)