The Cross of Lead (Crispin Series #1)

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Overview

"Asta's Son" is all he's ever been called. The lack of a name is appropriate, because he and his mother are but poor peasants in 14th century medieval England. But this thirteen-year-old boy who thought he had little to lose soon finds himself with even less—no home, no family, or possessions. Accused of a crime he did not commit, he may be killed on sight, by anyone. If he wishes to remain alive, he must flee his tiny village. All the boy takes with him is a newly revealed name—Crispin—and his mother's cross of ...
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NY 2003 Hardcover 1st Edition New. No Jacket Book. 12mo-over 6?-7?" tall. This is a New and Unread copy of the first edition (1st printing). No dust jacket. Winner of the John ... Newbery Medal. Read more Show Less

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The Cross of Lead (Crispin Series #1)

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Overview

"Asta's Son" is all he's ever been called. The lack of a name is appropriate, because he and his mother are but poor peasants in 14th century medieval England. But this thirteen-year-old boy who thought he had little to lose soon finds himself with even less—no home, no family, or possessions. Accused of a crime he did not commit, he may be killed on sight, by anyone. If he wishes to remain alive, he must flee his tiny village. All the boy takes with him is a newly revealed name—Crispin—and his mother's cross of lead.

Winner of the 2003 Newbery Medal

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
The Barnes & Noble Review
Winner of the 2003 Newbery Medal, Avi's action-packed adventure, Crispin, transports us back to 14th-century England, where a young serf on the run from his miserable past comes to discover not only his true identity but a sense of self-worth.

Infusing his tale with a deep sense of medieval time and place, Avi recounts the harrowing story of a "nameless boy" known only as "Asta's son." When his mother dies and the village steward unjustly accuses him of murder, the boy flees for his life, carrying with him his mother's lead cross and the newly revealed knowledge of his real name: Crispin. On the run, he becomes the servant and then the friend of a hulking juggler named Bear. En route to a clandestine meeting with social reformer John Ball (a real historical figure in the Peasants' Revolt of 1381), Bear is captured and imprisoned. Crispin sets out to rescue his master and discovers along the way the life-changing secret engraved on his mother's lead cross.

Crispin is one of Avi's most engaging characters, and this story one of his most moving adventures. Emerging from intense poverty of life and spirit, this young serf evolves into a complex and brave hero, as he learns that knowledge is the power that leads to true freedom. Readers will be swept away by the rich prose and historical details; Crispin is a life-affirming book that picks you up -- and doesn't let you down. Matt Warner

Publishers Weekly
Set in 14th-century England, this Newbery-winning novel centers on an orphaned outcast who gets pegged for murder. "How the boy learns his true identity and finds his place in the world makes for a rattling fine yarn," wrote PW in a starred review. Ages 8-12. (June) Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature
When his mother dies, the thirteen-year-old boy grieves his loss. He is alone in the world, never having known his father. In fact, he doesn't even know if he has a name. He has always been called Asta's son. Events become puzzling when Asta's son learns he has been declared a "wolf's head," which means anyone could kill him, for he is not considered human. It is said that he stole money from the manor house. Asta's son wonders why the steward would make up such a story. The village priest tells him he was baptized "Crispin," gives him his mother's lead cross and tells him he should leave the village for a big city where he could become a free man within the year. Father Quinel promises to tell him what he knows about his parents, but before he can do so, he is murdered. Fearing for his life, Crispin leaves. After several days he meets a large, red-bearded man called Bear. He makes Crispin swear to become his servant, but through the course of the story their friendship develops to the point where Bear thinks of Crispin as his son. Bear is imprisoned as bait to catch Crispin. The young boy, armed with the knowledge of what is written on his mother's lead cross, attempts a brave rescue of his friend. Crispin's identity will not come as a surprise to the sophisticated reader. Avi creates a strong sense of time and place by using the first person narrative. As Crispin learns about the world of fourteenth century England beyond his village, so too does the reader. The harshness of medieval life is presented, with descriptions such as that of the hanging man, but it is done without sensationalism. Avi has described the smells so well, you would think you were there. While it is Crispin'sstory, it is the character of Bear that will entrance the reader. 2003, Hyperion,
— Sharon Salluzzo <%ISBN%>0786808284
VOYA
In 1377 England, mysteries surround thirteen-year-old Crispin, a serf from a rural village who never knows his own name until his mother dies. Nor does he know just who his mother really was—why she was an outcast or how she learned to read and write. Shortly after her burial, Crispin finds himself pursued by men who mean to kill him for reasons he does not understand. He escapes, only to be captured by a huge juggler named Bear. Bear teaches Crispin to sing and play the recorder, and slowly they begin to get to know one another. When they perform in villages and towns, however, they discover that the hunt for Crispin is still in full swing. For Crispin, this situation makes the question of Bear's trustworthiness vital, for Bear has secrets of his own. The suspense stays taut until the very end of the book, when Crispin uncovers his identity and then must decide how to act on that information. His journey to selfhood recalls Alice's in Karen Cushman's The Midwife's Apprentice (Clarion, 1995/VOYA August 1995). Like Alice, Crispin casts off his timidity to make a place for himself within a society that would discard him. As does Cushman, Avi renders the sights, sounds, and smells of medieval England accurately and compellingly. He shows the pervasiveness of the church in medieval society and, in a subplot, weaves in details about John Ball and the Peasant's Rebellion. Exciting and true to the past, this novel is historical fiction at its finest. PLB
— Rebecca Barnhouse
From The Critics
Living in the hopelessness of servitude to a cruel feudal lord in 14th century England seems bleak enough for any teenage boy, but Crispin, the protagonist of this historical novel, has even more to bear. Not only are his parents dead, the cruel steward, John Aycliffe, falsely accuses him of two crimes — stealing money from the manor and murdering a priest. He's proclaimed a "wolf's head," a person who has committed so heinous a crime, that anyone may kill him for a reward, no trial needed. Escaping, Crispin starts a journey that eventually brings him face to face with the truth of his father's identity, and his own as well. Along the way, he discovers a new "father" in the person of a wandering minstrel named Bear. He also discovers a world he never knew existed and develops a strong sense of self and an emotional independence he could never have developed had he simply accepted the fate life seemed to have dealt him. Historically accurate in its references to the Peasant Revolt of 1381, Crispin provides an insightful look at life in medieval England for a teenage boy caught in the hopelessness of the feudal system. Students will identify with his sense of loss as he buries his mother and takes on the responsibilities of feeding and caring for himself. They'll learn to love and appreciate Crispin's surrogate father Bear's rough mannerisms as they get to know him. 2002, Hyperion, 262 pp., Ages young adult.
—Wendy Kelleher
School Library Journal
As with Karen Cushman's The Midwife's Apprentice (Clarion, 1995), the power of a name is apparent in this novel set in 14th-century England. "Asta's son" is all the destitute, illiterate hero has ever been called, but after his mother dies, he learns that his given name is Crispin, and that he is in mortal danger. The local priest is murdered before he can tell him more about his background, and Aycliffe, the evil village steward for Lord Furnival, declares that the boy is a "wolf's head," less than human, and that he should be killed on sight. On the run, with nothing to sustain him but his faith in God, Crispin meets "Bear," a roving entertainer who has ties to an underground movement to improve living conditions for the common people. They make their way to Great Wexley, where Bear has clandestine meetings and Crispin hopes to escape from Aycliffe and his soldiers, who stalk him at every turn. Suspense heightens when the boy learns that the recently deceased Lord Furnival was his father and that Aycliffe is dead set on preventing him from claiming his title. To trap his prey, the villain captures Bear, and Crispin risks his life to save him. Avi has done an excellent job of integrating background and historical information, of pacing the plot so that the book is a page-turner from beginning to end, and of creating characters for whom readers will have great empathy. The result is a meticulously crafted story, full of adventure, mystery, and action.-Cheri Estes, Detroit Country Day Middle School, Beverly Hills, MI Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
A tale of one boy's coming into self-knowledge is set against a backdrop of increasing peasant unrest in 14th-century England. Crispin does not even know his own name until his mother dies; he and she have lived at the literal margin of their small town, serfs, and therefore beneath notice. Suddenly, he is framed for murder and has a bounty put on his head. Escaping, he encounters the mercurial itinerant juggler Bear, who takes him on as servant and friend, teaching him both performers' tricks and revolutionary ideology-which puts them both in danger. After a rather slow and overwritten start, Avi (The Good Dog, 2001, etc.) moves the plot along deftly, taking the two from a Black Death-devastated countryside into a city oozing with intrigue, from the aristocracy to the peasants. The setting bristles with 14th-century details: a decomposing body hangs at a roadside gallows and gutters overflow with filth. The characters are somewhat less well-developed; although the revolutionary and frequently profane Bear is a fascinating treasure, Crispin himself lurches along, progressing from milquetoast to restless rebel to boy of courage and conviction in fits and starts, driven by plot needs rather than organic character growth. The story is set in the years just prior to the Peasants' Revolt of 1381, and one of the secondary characters, the revolutionary priest John Ball, was a key historical figure. Most children will not know this, however, as there is no historical note to contextualize the story. This is a shame, as despite its flaws, this offering is nevertheless a solid adventure and could serve as the jumping-off point for an exploration into a time of great political upheaval. The titlehints at a sequel; let us hope that it includes notes.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780439574679
  • Publisher: Scholastic, Inc.
  • Series: Crispin Series, #1
  • Age range: 10 - 14 Years

Meet the Author

Avi
Avi's books are loved by kids and adults everywhere. He has written more than 50 books, several of which have garnered prestigious awards, including the Newbery Medal and two Newbery Honors. His titles with Hyperion include Crispin: The Cross of Lead, Crispin at the Edge of the World, and The Book Without Words. He lives with his family in Colorado.

Biography

Born in Manhattan in 1937, Avi Wortis grew up in Brooklyn in a family of artists and writers. Despite his bright and inquisitive nature, he did poorly in school. After several academic failures, he was diagnosed with a writing impairment called dysgraphia which caused him to reverse letters and misspell words. The few writing and spelling skills he possessed he had gleaned from his favorite hobby, reading -- a pursuit enthusiastically encouraged in his household.

Following junior high school, Avi was assigned to a wonderful tutor whose taught him basic skills and encouraged in him a real desire to write. "Perhaps it was stubbornness," he recalled in an essay appearing on the Educational Paperback Association's website, "but from that time forward I wanted to write in some way, some form. It was the one thing everybody said I could not do."

Avi finally learned to write, and well! He attended Antioch University, graduated from the University of Wisconsin, and received a master's degree in library science from Columbia in 1964. He worked as a librarian for the New York Public Library's theater collection and for Trenton State College, and taught college courses in children's literature, while continuing to write -- mostly plays -- on the side. In the 1970s, with two sons of his own, he began to craft stories for children. "[My] two boys loved to hear stories," he recalled. "We played a game in which they would give me a subject ('a glass of water') and I would have to make up the story right then. Out of that game came my first children's book, Things That Sometimes Happen." A collection of "Very Short Stories for Little Listeners," Avi's winning debut received very positive reviews. "Sounding very much like the stories that children would make up themselves," raved Kirkus Reviews, "these are daffy and nonsensical, starting and ending in odd places and going sort of nowhere in the middle. The result, however, is inevitably a sly grin."

Avi has gone on to write dozens of books for kids of all ages. The True Confessions of Charlotte Doyle (1991) and Nothing but the Truth (1992) were named Newbery Honor Books, and in 2003, he won the prestigious Newbery Medal for his 14th-century adventure tale, Crispin: The Cross of Lead. His books range from mysteries and adventure stories to historical novels and coming-of-age tales; and although there is often a strong moral core to his work, he leavens his message with appealing warmth and humor. Perhaps his philosophy is summed up best in this quote from his author profile on Scholastic's website: "I want my readers to feel, to think, sometimes to laugh. But most of all I want them to enjoy a good read."

Good To Know

In a Q&A with his publisher, Avi named Robert Louis Stevenson as one of his greatest inspirations, noting that "he epitomizes a kind of storytelling that I dearly love and still read because it is true, it has validity, and beyond all, it is an adventure."

When he's not writing, Avi enjoys photography as one of his favorite hobbies.

Avi got his unique nickname from his twin sister, Emily..

Read More Show Less
    1. Also Known As:
      Avi Wortis (full name)
    1. Date of Birth:
      December 23, 1937
    2. Place of Birth:
      New York, New York
    1. Education:
      University of Wisconsin; M.A. in Library Science from Columbia University, 1964
    2. Website:

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 208 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(105)

4 Star

(63)

3 Star

(9)

2 Star

(7)

1 Star

(24)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 208 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 16, 2008

    GREAT BUY!

    I would strongly recommend this book to anybody that likes adventure books that keep you guessing. This book is about a 13 year-old boy named Crispin whose mother died. Shortly after he is orphaned, he is proclaimed a ¿wolf¿s head,¿ meaning anyone can kill him. Crispin is accused of stealing money and the murder of a priest. In most of the story Crispin is running, scared for his safety and his life, because people want to kill him. I would recommend this book to all middle school students.

    10 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 23, 2012

    KEEP READING!!!!!

    This book is boring at the begining! But once you get to the middle it is like you are stuck in the middle of CRISPIN THE CROSS OF LEAD. You can not stop reading............ I am reading this book in 6th grade language and didn't want to read it but I'm glad I did! I recommend this to 11+. It truely is an awesoms book!

    4 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 11, 2011

    Good for people who like suspense!

    At the beggining it seems a little boring, but towards the middle the book gets really interesting and entertaining! I was givin a list at the end of fith grade, this and the black pearl were two of the six books! Blac pearl is also an interesting book. I would like to recommend the black pearl to anyone who likes this book. It is about a boy whose mother dies, gets named a wolf's head, and finds a friend. I believe most people will like it!!! I did, and now I must write a report on it. Yay.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 24, 2008

    BEST BOOK a must read

    This was the best book i have ever read and i barely read i can't wait until i get the second one

    3 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 24, 2004

    It's an okay book

    I give this book 3 stars because Crispin and the cross of lead didn't interest me enough to give the book 5 stars..I don't think i would like to read the book again.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 4, 2013

    Awesome book

    It was gery dry at first but after you kept turning the pages it got better and better. It is a great book and has a great plot. Great for all middle schoolers

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 26, 2011

    Crispin: Cross of the Lead

    I had to read this book in schol and I loved it! I do have to say some parts were a little dull but then it got amuzing! Crispin is a perfect book for ages 11-15

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 6, 2011

    Greatest start to the Crispin series

    I read this book and fell in love!These books are to die for! All I have to say,READ THE BOOK!

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 26, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    A world that shocks and facinates as much as the plot.

    Review by Jill Williamson<BR/><BR/>Asta¿s son has never had a name. But now that his mother has died, a priest tells him his name is Crispin. Accused of a crime he didn¿t commit, Crispin flees his village home. On his journey he meets a juggler named Bear, who teaches him the ways of entertaining, self defense, and snaring rabbits. At first Crispin is afraid of Bear, but the man takes care of him and teaches him to think for himself.<BR/><BR/>Crispin¿s enemies continue to pursue him. Crispin wonders why they are so intent on seeing him killed? He is no one. He and Bear reach the city of Great Wexly where Crispin stumbles onto a dark secret that leaves him no choice but to fight for his and Bear¿s life.<BR/><BR/>Crispin: the Cross of Lead is a story about a poor orphan in medieval England. Avi creates a world for the reader that shocks and fascinates as much as the plot. It¿s no surprise why this book earned the Newberry. I highly recommend it for everyone.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 23, 2014

    Good so far!!!!

    Interesting so far slightly deppressing but it is the midevil times, so what do expect. I am 80 pgs in and so far it is good.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 21, 2014

    Sucks

    THIS IS HW!!!!

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 14, 2014

    AWFUL

    This book is so bad I would not even read past the first chapter and the first chapter dragged on even though it was not that long of a chapter.it was so bad I do not even want to put a star for the rate but I have to

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 10, 2014

    c======():::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::>

    I'M GONNA EAT YOUR BABIES!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 14, 2014

    Great

    One of the best books i have evet read

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 22, 2014

    Awful

    This book is so boring and is hard to get whats happening in the story

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 15, 2013

    Crispin

    Best book ever!!!!!!!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 5, 2013

    NOT AS GOOD AS I HOPED... COULDA BEEN BETTER!! HORRIBLE BOOK!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    CRISPIN wasnt as good as I had hoped. The cover looked good. I admit, it was a catchy cover. But sometimes, this gal(Yes, I am a girl) is very picky. Especially when it comes to run-away, adventure books. Like Percy Jackson. Yeah, thats a good example. Percy Jackson and Coraline are better books than Crispin. I read books better than this. And they are terrible books. Avi, I am dissapointed in this book. No mental pictures to match Crispins personality. I still have lots questions exploding in my brain! Like, WHY DID CRISPIN RUN AWAY THE FIRST TIME? WHY DIDNT HE LISTEN? Those are only some of the questions I have. So, readers, I suggest you DON'T read this book. Avi, I am sorry. But try harder next time. I might still read your boks. But not this ine. Sorry. Once again, Avi.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 18, 2013

    To below

    What is Yolo

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 2, 2012

    Hf

    Fghdeczfg

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 14, 2012

    Suckish book

    This book was the worst book i hateeit with all my heart. Except Bear. Dont ever reas it in your life . Read walk two moons

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 208 Customer Reviews

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