Cross-Sectional Human Anatomy / Edition 1

Other Format (Print)
Buy New
Buy New from BN.com
$40.95
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $10.49
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 77%)
Other sellers (Other Format)
  • All (10) from $10.49   
  • New (6) from $29.99   
  • Used (4) from $10.49   

Overview

Featuring full color cross-sectional images from The Visible Human Project, this new atlas is co-authored by a radiologist and includes orientation drawings with corresponding MRIs and CTs. Thus students can understand the relationship between anatomy and how it is represented in these imaging modalities. The text includes 100 full color tissue images, 200 line drawings, and 200 magnetic resonance and computed tomography images. Images are labeled with numbers; the key is on a separate two-page spread to facilitate self-testing.

The book contains predominantly black-and-white illustrations, with some color illustrations.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Edgar F. Allin, MD (Midwestern University)
Description: This atlas contains 80 transverse sections of the human body, from the Visible Human Project of the NIH (www.nlm.nih.gov/research/visible} with corresponding CT and MR images from living subjects and related diagnostic radiographs.
Purpose: The purpose is to provide first-year medical students with exposure to sectional anatomy, increasingly important in clinical practice thanks to improved imaging technology, while they are taking coursework in gross anatomy.
Audience: Although medical students are the primary intended audience, it is likely that many anatomists and physicians, especially radiologists, will also find the book useful.
Features: All regions of the adult male and female body are presented. Most of the sectional views are in the axial plane of current radiologic lingo (better termed transaxial, transverse, or horizontal) but a few are coronal replanarizations. Corresponding CT and MR views from the two cadavers that were cryosectioned to obtain the color photographic plates exist, but the authors chose to use similar images from patients. The main plates and their companion line drawings are labeled by rather chaotic superimposed numbers. On the same page are a key and a diagram showing the approximate section level. Magnifications are not uniform and are mostly far smaller than life-size. There is no bibliography other than a listing of the most useful web sites on the two "Visible Humans," but the index is quite complete.
Assessment: Larger pages and more judicious use of space would have allowed larger pictures showing more detail and more user-friendly labeling (words with lines to structures). Number labels are nice for self-testing but are laborious, especially for novices. There are occasional misidentifications, false statements, misspellings, and typographic defects. The abhorrent terms "ventroflexor" and "dorsiflexor" are used for the anterior and posterior compartments of the thigh. The second identification key (p. 6) is bollixed, which sets an early mood of mistrust. Some figures are repeated unnecessarily. The basic concept of the book is excellent, and it provides valuable access to the ever-multiplying Internet and CD-ROM progeny of the two cryosectioned subjects.
Edgar F. Allin
This atlas contains 80 transverse sections of the human body, from the Visible Human Project of the NIH (www.nlm.nih.gov/research/visible} with corresponding CT and MR images from living subjects and related diagnostic radiographs. The purpose is to provide first-year medical students with exposure to sectional anatomy, increasingly important in clinical practice thanks to improved imaging technology, while they are taking coursework in gross anatomy. Although medical students are the primary intended audience, it is likely that many anatomists and physicians, especially radiologists, will also find the book useful. All regions of the adult male and female body are presented. Most of the sectional views are in the axial plane of current radiologic lingo (better termed transaxial, transverse, or horizontal) but a few are coronal replanarizations. Corresponding CT and MR views from the two cadavers that were cryosectioned to obtain the color photographic plates exist, but the authors chose to use similar images from patients. The main plates and their companion line drawings are labeled by rather chaotic superimposed numbers. On the same page are a key and a diagram showing the approximate section level. Magnifications are not uniform and are mostly far smaller than life-size. There is no bibliography other than a listing of the most useful web sites on the two ""Visible Humans,"" but the index is quite complete. Larger pages and more judicious use of space would have allowed larger pictures showing more detail and more user-friendly labeling (words with lines to structures). Number labels are nice for self-testing but are laborious, especially for novices. There are occasionalmisidentifications, false statements, misspellings, and typographic defects. The abhorrent terms ""ventroflexor"" and ""dorsiflexor"" are used for the anterior and posterior compartments of the thigh. The second identification key (p. 6) is bollixed, which sets an early mood of mistrust. Some figures are repeated unnecessarily. The basic concept of the book is excellent, and it provides valuable access to the ever-multiplying Internet and CD-ROM progeny of the two cryosectioned subjects.
Booknews
Dean (neurological surgery, Case Western Reserve U.) and Herbener (radiology, U. Hospitals of Cleveland) correlate color images from the Visible Human Project with radiologic images. Corresponding line drawings locate features in the tissue images and correlate them to plain film, ultrasound, MR, and CT images for better visualization of how structures appear in these modalities. In addition, orientation illustrations and notes for each image emphasize important structures. The nine chapters mirror the regional anatomical organization of , Grant's Dissector/>, and Moore and Dalley's , including the same color tab indexing, and the opening sections provide information on spatial relationships between structures within each anatomical feature. Spiral binding. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

3 Stars from Doody
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780683303858
  • Publisher: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
  • Publication date: 2/28/2000
  • Format: Spiral Bound
  • Edition description: SPIRAL
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 200
  • Sales rank: 470,947
  • Product dimensions: 11.60 (w) x 8.42 (h) x 0.72 (d)

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)