Crossing and Dwelling: A Theory of Religion

Paperback (Print)
Rent
Rent from BN.com
$9.54
(Save 59%)
Est. Return Date: 12/21/2014
Buy Used
Buy Used from BN.com
$15.69
(Save 31%)
Item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging.
Condition: Used – Good details
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $1.99
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 91%)
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (10) from $1.99   
  • New (4) from $21.77   
  • Used (6) from $1.99   

Overview

Beginning with a Cuban Catholic ritual in Miami, this book takes readers on a momentous theoretical journey toward a new understanding of religion. At this historical moment, when movement across boundaries is of critical importance for all areas of human life—from media and entertainment to economy and politics—Thomas Tweed offers a powerful vision of religion in motion, dynamic, alive with crossings and flows.

A deeply researched, broadly gauged, and vividly written study of religion such as few American scholars have ever attempted, Crossing and Dwelling depicts religion in place and in movement, dwelling and crossing. Tweed considers how religion situates devotees in time and space, positioning them in the body, the home, the homeland, and the cosmos. He explores how the religious employ tropes, artifacts, rituals, and institutions to mark boundaries and to prescribe and proscribe different kinds of movements across those boundaries; and how religions enable and constrain terrestrial, corporeal, and cosmic crossings.

Drawing on insights from the natural and social sciences, Tweed's work is grounded in the gritty particulars of distinctive religious practices, even as it moves toward ideas about cross-cultural patterns. At a time when scholars in many fields shy away from generalizations, this book offers a responsible way to think broadly about religion, a topic that is crucial for understanding the contemporary world. Lucid in explanations, engaging in presentation, rich in examples, Crossing and Dwelling has profound implications for the study and teaching of religion in our day.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

American Religious Experience website

Thomas Tweed has written the most important theoretical book of this decade, and maybe this generation, for geographers of religion...While Tweed's theory is philosophically detailed, readers will be impressed with the wide array of religions and nationalities represented in the analysis...Any scholar interested in either religion or geography will find this volume a refreshing and enlightening study. Those interested in both religion and geography will soon find themselves woefully behind in their scholarship if they have not yet digested it.
— Michael Ferber

Tikkun

Tweed's contrast of religion in stasis and in motion helps illuminate the vexing issue of religious pluralism.
— Roger S. Gottlieb

Religion

Thomas Tweed's new book is impressive in its synthetic originality, its comprehensiveness and its communicative style. It brings together many strands of contemporary theory that otherwise would not end up in the same book. It is compelling for its inventive exploration of a particular model of religion...Crossing and Dwelling constructs a remarkably thoughtful synthesis that will stimulate much discussion. It thoroughly de-essentialises religion while valiantly reinstating the pragmatic and extendable value of the category. The endnotes themselves are extraordinarily rich and extensive, with wide referencing to relevant literature outside religious studies, and the text is enhanced with twenty-four illustrations. For its combined scholarship, ingenuity and wide interest, the book will deservedly find its way onto many reading lists.
— William E. Paden

Annals of the Association of American Geographers
Thomas Tweed's provocative, thoughtful, and meaningful insights into what it means to be religious are outlined in his new book... Tweed's work is most welcome to those of us who understand that being human has much to do with our imagining and making places... Cultural and social geographers will find Tweed's ideas useful in their work and in the classroom whether or not the actual subject material is related to the religious realm.
Religious Studies Review

An engaging, original, and insightful approach to theorizing the transnational face of twenty-first-century religion.
— Steven Engler

Religion - William E. Paden
Thomas Tweed's new book is impressive in its synthetic originality, its comprehensiveness and its communicative style. It brings together many strands of contemporary theory that otherwise would not end up in the same book. It is compelling for its inventive exploration of a particular model of religion... Crossing and Dwelling constructs a remarkably thoughtful synthesis that will stimulate much discussion. It thoroughly de-essentialises religion while valiantly reinstating the pragmatic and extendable value of the category. The endnotes themselves are extraordinarily rich and extensive, with wide referencing to relevant literature outside religious studies, and the text is enhanced with twenty-four illustrations. For its combined scholarship, ingenuity and wide interest, the book will deservedly find its way onto many reading lists.
Religious Studies Review - Steven Engler
An engaging, original, and insightful approach to theorizing the transnational face of twenty-first-century religion.
Tikkun - Roger S. Gottlieb
Tweed's contrast of religion in stasis and in motion helps illuminate the vexing issue of religious pluralism.
American Religious Experience website - Michael Ferber
Thomas Tweed has written the most important theoretical book of this decade, and maybe this generation, for geographers of religion... While Tweed's theory is philosophically detailed, readers will be impressed with the wide array of religions and nationalities represented in the analysis... Any scholar interested in either religion or geography will find this volume a refreshing and enlightening study. Those interested in both religion and geography will soon find themselves woefully behind in their scholarship if they have not yet digested it.
Bruce B. Lawrence
This is a masterpiece. It belongs on everyone's shelf next to William James's The Varieties of Religious Experience. Tweed's book is at once elegant and informed, a thorough intellectual sighting of religion.
Daniel Pals
Tweed boldly offers here a new and differently devised definition of religion. And he anchors that definition in widely disparate phenomena of religious life around the globe. It is refreshing to see an analysis that moves wisely beyond the insularity of past debates. This book will stir some still waters and elicit a profitable exchange of ideas.
Ann Taves
Crossing and Dwelling provides a strikingly new and compelling theory of religion. Religions, Tweed argues, are much like watches and compasses: they help people find their bearings. Throughout he offers numerous examples from a variety of traditions and contexts to illustrate the way that his theory works. Tweed's engaging writing style should make the book accessible to a wide range of readers.
Religion
Thomas Tweed's new book is impressive in its synthetic originality, its comprehensiveness and its communicative style. It brings together many strands of contemporary theory that otherwise would not end up in the same book. It is compelling for its inventive exploration of a particular model of religion...Crossing and Dwelling constructs a remarkably thoughtful synthesis that will stimulate much discussion. It thoroughly de-essentialises religion while valiantly reinstating the pragmatic and extendable value of the category. The endnotes themselves are extraordinarily rich and extensive, with wide referencing to relevant literature outside religious studies, and the text is enhanced with twenty-four illustrations. For its combined scholarship, ingenuity and wide interest, the book will deservedly find its way onto many reading lists.
— William E. Paden
Tikkun
Tweed's contrast of religion in stasis and in motion helps illuminate the vexing issue of religious pluralism.
— Roger S. Gottlieb
Religious Studies Review
An engaging, original, and insightful approach to theorizing the transnational face of twenty-first-century religion.
— Steven Engler
American Religious Experience website
Thomas Tweed has written the most important theoretical book of this decade, and maybe this generation, for geographers of religion...While Tweed's theory is philosophically detailed, readers will be impressed with the wide array of religions and nationalities represented in the analysis...Any scholar interested in either religion or geography will find this volume a refreshing and enlightening study. Those interested in both religion and geography will soon find themselves woefully behind in their scholarship if they have not yet digested it.
— Michael Ferber
Annals of the Association of American Geographers
Thomas Tweed's provocative, thoughtful, and meaningful insights into what it means to be religious are outlined in his new book...Tweed's work is most welcome to those of us who understand that being human has much to do with our imagining and making places...Cultural and social geographers will find Tweed's ideas useful in their work and in the classroom whether or not the actual subject material is related to the religious realm.
— 03/01/2007
Library Journal
Beginning with his reflections on the Cuban Catholic community in Miami, Tweed (religious studies, Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill) develops a dynamic and relational theory of religion he feels has been lacking. He sees the key ideas of religion as being place (dwelling) and travel and exile (crossing) and uses the concept of itinerary to examine both Eastern and Western religions. As Tweed sees it, religion acts like a compass, helping to situate people in the body, the home, the homeland, and the cosmos. At the same time, we are all crossing boundaries: terrestrial, corporal, and cosmic. He offers a thoughtful analysis of the nature of religion and speaks of the limitations of his theory as well as of its potential. This well-thought-out work, accessible to scholars and lay readers alike, is a worthy successor to Mircea Eliade's Images and Symbols: Studies in Religious Symbolism, which remains the classic text on the subject. For larger religion collections.-Augustine J. Curley, Newark Abbey, NJ Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780674027640
  • Publisher: Harvard University Press
  • Publication date: 3/28/2008
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Pages: 288
  • Sales rank: 829,676
  • Product dimensions: 5.45 (w) x 7.89 (h) x 0.75 (d)

Meet the Author

Thomas A. Tweed is Shive, Lindsay, and Gray Profesor of Religious Studies, University of Texas at Austin.
Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

List of Illustrations

1. Itineraries: Locating Theory and Theorists

2. Boundaries: Constitutive Terms, Orienting Tropes, and Exegetical Fussiness

3. Confluences: Toward a Theory of Religion

4. Dwelling: The Kinetics of Homemaking

5. Crossing: The Kinetics of Itinerancy

Conclusion: An Itinerary

Notes

Illustration Credits

Acknowledgments

Index

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)