Crossing on the Paris

( 10 )

Overview

The opulent age of empires is ending, but the great queens of the sea— the magnificent ocean liners—continue to reign supreme. Despite the tragedy of the Titanic, the race to build ever larger and more luxurious floating palaces continues, and passengers still flock to make the Atlantic crossing in style.

In 1921,the SS Paris leaves Le Havre on her maiden voyage. Aboard, passengers dine in glittering grandeur on French cuisine, served by hundreds of unnoticed servants and chefs....

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Crossing on the Paris

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Overview

The opulent age of empires is ending, but the great queens of the sea— the magnificent ocean liners—continue to reign supreme. Despite the tragedy of the Titanic, the race to build ever larger and more luxurious floating palaces continues, and passengers still flock to make the Atlantic crossing in style.

In 1921,the SS Paris leaves Le Havre on her maiden voyage. Aboard, passengers dine in glittering grandeur on French cuisine, served by hundreds of unnoticed servants and chefs. Below the waterline, the modern oil-fired engines throb day and night. And for three women, this voyage will profoundly change their lives.

Traveling first class, elderly Vera Sinclair is reluctantly moving back to Manhattan after thirty wonderful years abroad. In cozy second class, reveling in her brief freedom from family life, Constance Stone is returning after a failed mission to bring her errant sister home from France. And in the stifling servants’ quarters, young Le Havre native Julie Vernet is testing her wings in her first job as she sets out to forge her own future. For all three, in different ways, this transatlantic voyage will be a life-changing journey of the heart.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Gynther skillfully interweaves the tales of three women sailing from France to America in 1921 on the grand ocean liner that gives this solid debut novel its name. Vera Sinclair, a wealthy, elderly woman dying of breast cancer, doubts her decision to leave Charles, with whom she's shared a long companionship based in "mutual, rich and true" love, move back to Manhattan for her final days. Constance Stone, a "quiet, responsible" mother of three, is returning to a passionless marriage after failing to bring her rebellious sister home from Paris. And Julie Vernet, beginning her first job in the steerage dining room, hopes to escape the haunting memories of the war that killed her four brothers. In their five days at sea, these women encounter people who force them to contemplate their choices and identity. In Gynther's capable hands, the Paris comes alive in historic detail. Each of these women has a distinct and interesting voice, and the bonds they form with one another feel strong and meaningful. Gynther switches smoothly between their points of view, weaving a wholly satisfying, nostalgic journey from beginning to end. Bon voyage. Agent: Michelle Brower, Folio Literary Management. (Nov.)
Pam Jenoff
“With rich detail and elegant prose, Gynther creates a resonant and memorable tale.”
Roberta Rich
"Entrancing . . . a graceful tale, written with wry humor, of three women separated by class, age, and temperament. . . . Richly and sensually drawn."
From the Publisher
Gynther scores with this first-rate story centering on three women whose lives intersect aboard an ocean liner...The ship’s details, the different levels of service and luxury experienced by the passengers and crew, as well as the twists and turns of the passage, prove engrossing...Gynther proves herself a fine storyteller with this artful tale.

“Gynther skillfully interweaves the tales of three women sailing from France to America in 1921 on the grand ocean liner that gives this solid debut novel its name…Each of these women has a distinct and interesting voice, and the bonds they form with one another feel strong and meaningful. Gynther switches smoothly between their points of view, weaving a wholly satisfying, nostalgic journey from beginning to end. Bon voyage.”

"Gynther's debut is a lovely story...the leisurely place allows the friendship between these women of disparate classes to shine in this pleasant tale."

A November 2012 Indie Next Pick, Crossing on the Paris, about three women returning to America on a voyage that will change their lives, has the feel of a riveting miniseries as you turn the pages expectantly wanting to find out how this voyage ends.

“With rich detail and elegant prose, Gynther creates a resonant and memorable tale.”

"Entrancing . . . a graceful tale, written with wry humor, of three women separated by class, age, and temperament. . . . Richly and sensually drawn."

Barnes and Noble Book Club


A
November 2012 Indie Next Pick, Crossing on the Paris, about three women returning to America on a voyage that will change their lives, has the feel of a riveting miniseries as you turn the pages expectantly wanting to find out how this voyage ends.
Romantic Times
"Gynther's debut is a lovely story...the leisurely place allows the friendship between these women of disparate classes to shine in this pleasant tale."
Kirkus Reviews
In her debut, novelist Gynther scores with this first-rate story centering on three women whose lives intersect aboard an ocean liner. World War I has recently ended, and the French-based luxury liner, the Paris, is setting out on its maiden voyage to England and the United States. Three women climbing aboard the ship before departure are photographed together for the ship's newspaper, and as the five-day crossing progresses, their lives continue to overlap in unexpected ways. Julie, a young French girl whose four brothers died in the war, shattering her family, has taken a job aboard the ship. Excited at the prospect of leaving home for the first time, she reports from her position waiting tables and her life below deck in steerage. Second-class passenger Constance Stone is returning home to Massachusetts following a failed attempt to persuade her younger sister to come with her and try to talk their mentally deranged mother back to sanity; while elderly, ailing first-class passenger Vera Sinclair has given up her privileged life in Paris to return home to New York in order to wait for the inevitable. Julie and Constance both find romance they did not expect, and for Vera, there is also a discovery that changes everything she believes about herself. In the meantime, the three women keep crossing paths on the ship, not realizing how much they really have in common. Gynther does an excellent job of taking readers back to an Atlantic crossing in the early 1920s, when the U.S. was caught up in Prohibition and women were starting to question their roles in society. The ship's details, the different levels of service and luxury experienced by the passengers and crew, as well as the twists and turns of the passage, prove engrossing in Gynther's hands. Gynther proves herself a fine storyteller with this artful tale.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781451678239
  • Publisher: Gallery Books
  • Publication date: 11/13/2012
  • Edition description: Original
  • Pages: 336
  • Sales rank: 259,330
  • Product dimensions: 5.38 (w) x 8.08 (h) x 0.86 (d)

Meet the Author

Dana Gynther was raised in St Louis, Missouri and Auburn, Alabama. She has a BA from the University of Alabama in Political Science and French and an MA in French Literature. She has lived in France and currently lives in Valencia, Spain, where both she and her husband Carlos are teachers and translators. They have two daughters, Claudia and Lucia. Crossing on the Paris is her first novel.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 10 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 10 Customer Reviews
  • Posted November 22, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    Crossing on the Paris is a novel about three very different wome

    Crossing on the Paris is a novel about three very different women, all strangers to each other, whose paths cross while travelling aboard an ocean liner named the Paris to America. Vera Sinclair, an elderly, ill, wealthy socialite, reflects on her life as she returns to America to die after having lived most of her life in France. Constance Stone, a young married mother, analyzes her life and happiness as she leaves her husband and three children behind to convince her wayward sister in France to return home to America. Julie Vernet, a poverty stricken, unmarried woman takes a job as a waitress on the ocean liner in order to immigrate to America for a better life.

    For each of the three women in the story, the voyage is more than a simple journey – it is a life-altering event providing each woman time to reflect on their past or dream of their future or value what they already have. Their stories are poignant, sometimes painful to read, sometimes beautiful in simplicity. This character driven novel is deep and profound, set in a luxurious setting, and filled with the stories of three women who are impossible to forget. Readers will see a little of themselves in each woman while enjoying a most entertaining story. Highly recommended.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 16, 2012

    I felt like I had crossed on the Paris too by the time I finishe

    I felt like I had crossed on the Paris too by the time I finished. And in spite of the losses at the heart of her character´s lives Gynther manages too to pen a tale of heartwarming optomism. We are drawn into the complex class ridden world of the great liner and also given a window into the rich inner lives of her three heroines. A really mature first novel.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 15, 2012

    Crossing on the Paris is simply a great book. The story of three

    Crossing on the Paris is simply a great book. The story of three women whose lives come together aboard the ocean liner, The Paris, in the 20's is the perfect backdrop for Gynther's fine storytelling. She sees right through the frail human condition, and takes us into the lives of her characters as they each reach their own defining moment. Crossing on the Paris is one of those rare books that transcends genre, and has a wide appeal to an enormous range of readers. This makes it not only a great novel for you bookshelf, but a great gift as well. Well done!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 2, 2013

    Dana Gynther has created a beautiful tale of love, loss, self-di

    Dana Gynther has created a beautiful tale of love, loss, self-discovery and fate. Crossing the Paris is set on the maiden voyage of the Paris, departing from Le Havre, France and stopping at New York, this story centers around three women from very different backgrounds. The three women board the ship at the same time, briefly coming into contact. Though they do not speak to one another until the end of the novel, Crossing details their paths on the ocean liner and weaves their tales together beautifully. You can see the moments in which they just miss one another, and how their experiences on the ship lead them up to their big meet.
    Young Julie Vernet boards the Paris in hopes that she can not only go on an adventure, but to escape the grief that has befallen her since the deaths of her three older brothers in WW1. Her life in France was joyous but difficult. With little money, she applied for a job in the steerage class (3rd class) as a maid, and found her offer of employment was fate. Life on board is not what she hoped and just when she begins to think her choice of change was wrong she meets Russian, Nikolai who pursues her with passion and aggression. Julie’s experiences on the ship make her stronger and help her realize that this was the right choice. I like Julie quite a bit and found that I could connect with her- her insecurities and hopes for adventure. Her reactions to life in 3rd class are real and the imagery definitely makes you feel as if you are there with her (the mouse scene made me itch for days!).
    Constance Stone had traveled to Paris in hopes of persuading her younger, carefree sister, Faith, to return home to help care for their ailing mother. Faith has found her place in France, and Constance boards the ship reflecting on their lives as children, her own daughters, and her loveless marriage. You get to see Constance struggle with who she was and who she has become, and how she works towards making herself happy and finding inner peace. She falls for the ship’s doctor, Serge, and comes to see that though she returns his feelings, she has a wonderful life at home with her family. Constance’s journey is also one of reflection and self-discovery, and she comes to realize that change and fate wear the same hat. Though Constance could be a bit boring, I loved her trying to be someone different. She does everything that is expected of her and she wants to do the things that no one would think she c/would do. I must say though, it was nice to see her prepare to leave the ship, accepting who she is and the live she has created.
    Vera Sinclair has spent the last thirty years in France and is returning home upon the discovery that she is dying. Staying in first class, we get to see a different life than that of Julie and Constance. Vera reads through her journals, books she has been keeping for years and realizes that the life she lived is slowly coming to a close. She meets Julie and Constance by chance. She is above deck in a bit of a fever the two women come to her aid, and they retreat back to her room to talk about their lives before the Paris, on the Paris and what their hopes are for when they dock. The three women connect instantly, with each one learning something from the others. I think having a character like Vera not only displays the difference in class but the difference in age among the three. Without her, the other two would fall short. I found Vera to be the glue that kept everything together and moving.
    Ms. Gynther’s research on ocean liner terminology, the living quarters, duties, events and dialect of all on board is exquisite. I often found myself slipping away into the world of the Paris, and hoping that I would stumble into one of the three women. Incredibly entertaining, but equally mysterious, Crossing on the Paris expertly delivers complex yet relatable characters, an impeccable plot and intriguing secrets.

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  • Posted June 17, 2013

    Loved this book, I enjoyed reading it so much. I would recommend

    Loved this book, I enjoyed reading it so much. I would recommend this book to anyone.

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  • Posted February 4, 2013

    I loved this book! Perfect blending of stories about three diff

    I loved this book! Perfect blending of stories about three different women. I found myself experiencing the same feelings and emotions as the women in the book. I can't wait for more books from Dana Gynther!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 10, 2012

    I was touched by the three women dealing with issues and feeling

    I was touched by the three women dealing with issues and feelings that we all have to deal with at some times in our lives.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 15, 2012

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    Posted February 8, 2013

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    Posted January 3, 2013

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