Crossing the Blvd: Strangers, Neighbors, Aliens in a New America

Overview

A kaleidoscopic view of new immigrants and refugees living in Queens, New York the most ethnically diverse locality in the United States.

For three years, Warren Lehrer and Judith Sloan traveled the world by trekking the streets of their home borough. This book documents the people they encountered along the way. First person narratives are illuminated by strikingly direct photographic portraits of the subjects alongside the objects of their worlds. Lehrer's postmodern, Talmudic...

See more details below
Paperback
$14.52
BN.com price
(Save 27%)$19.95 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (26) from $1.99   
  • New (3) from $12.77   
  • Used (23) from $1.99   
Sending request ...

Overview

A kaleidoscopic view of new immigrants and refugees living in Queens, New York the most ethnically diverse locality in the United States.

For three years, Warren Lehrer and Judith Sloan traveled the world by trekking the streets of their home borough. This book documents the people they encountered along the way. First person narratives are illuminated by strikingly direct photographic portraits of the subjects alongside the objects of their worlds. Lehrer's postmodern, Talmudic design juxtaposes the multiple perspectives of these new Americans, now thrown together as neighbors, classmates, coworkers, enemies, and friends. They reflect on the good, the ugly and the unexpected in their stories of crossing oceans, borders, wars, economic hardship, and cultural divides. These soulful narratives are put in context by the authors' personal and historical observations. The voices, images and sounds collected here form a portrait of a paradoxical and ever-shifting America.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Debbie Nathan - City Limits
“This stunningly innovative book goes beyond pathos, into the kaleidoscope of experience that defines real immigrant life.”
Dean Ulsher
“One of the most important stories in New York..the authors know immigrants as individuals. That's the way it should be.”
Ron Daniels
“Fascinating.... this extraordinary volume...provides a glimpse of the new America which is emerging.”
Archivist Roundtable of New York: Winner
“Explodes the paradigms of oral history and reinterpreti[s] them for our multimedia century...”
John Kuo Wei Tchen
“Brings alive the most polyglot place on the planet....An outstanding book on the new New York!”
Dave Isay
“Brims over with the energy, heart and spirit that went into creating this important work.”
Eve Ensler
“Boldly carries the tradition of oral history into the 21st Century. An electrifying collage of voices, faces, and spirits.”
Publishers Weekly
New York's undersung borough of Queens, home to the new Ellis Island (the city's airports), may be the most diverse county in the country today, and documentarians Lehrer and Sloan have innovatively brought it to life. First-person narratives that sometimes intertwine several voices (some were broadcast on the public radio program The Next Big Thing) are matched by a bold and colorful layout: large portraits, long-view landscapes, multiple typefaces (sometimes within the same paragraph) and inset graphics or asides. The stories are grouped in five lower-case sections: "contemporary pilgrims," "asylum seekers," "family ties," "neighborhood tales" and "unlikely coexistences" (Ping-Pong players, a high school, a punk-gypsy cabaret band). The language can be poetic; a Congolese asylum-seeker declares, "Wackenhut is a for-profit business they are making from the sorrow of detainees." Two Egyptian restaurateurs, brothers, lament gentrification: "You really killed yourself with the atmosphere you created." A Russian migr expresses disbelief that a call to 911 would actually bring the cops. Some interviewees express melancholy about their move, but they generally agree-an old American story-that opportunities are better for their kids. An accompanying CD (sold separately if you buy the paperback) includes interview excerpts as well as music by the authors and some of their subjects. While some of the texture of Queens is sacrificed-you wouldn't know the library system is the busiest in the country-this book remains an arresting, vividly printed mosaic. (Sept.) Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Library Journal
In the wake of 9/11, four youths smash up an Egyptian coffee shop. The police react swiftly, but the owner refuses to press charges-and the youths return that night to apologize, clean up, and talk. A Congolese hydraulic engineer and refugee endures two years in a windowless INS detention center without explanation or charge. This volume collects the searing first-person stories of these and 72 other Queens residents, recent immigrants from everywhere. Eponymous Queens Boulevard, 12 hazardous lanes intersecting this most ethnically diverse spot in the United States, emblematizes the perils faced back home and in America and the convergence of countless cultures. Each profile is a collage of text and image, and the pages of this book frequently incorporate two or three narratives plus notes and bold photographs of the participants, their streetscapes, and iconic artifacts. The effect is dazzling but organic and appropriate; documentary artists Lehrer and Sloan have produced a collective oral history as vibrant as a live event. A companion audio CD, which comes with the cloth edition or can be purchased separately (ISBN 0-393-10588-1. $15), samples the voices and music of participants in experimental fashion. Strongly recommended for public and academic collections.-Janet Ingraham Dwyer, Worthington P.L., OH Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780393324662
  • Publisher: Norton, W. W. & Company, Inc.
  • Publication date: 8/4/2003
  • Pages: 400
  • Sales rank: 834,799
  • Product dimensions: 6.60 (w) x 9.80 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Meet the Author

Award winning writer, designer and photographer Warren Lehrer, and actress, writer and oral historian Judith Sloan—a married couple—live in Queens where they co-founded EarSay, a non-profit arts organization. Their multimedia projects portray lives of the uncelebrated, bridging the divide between documentary and expressive forms. As part of this project they produced Crossing the BLVD documentaries for New York Public Radio.

Award winning writer, designer and photographer Warren Lehrer, and actress, writer and oral historian Judith Sloan—a married couple—live in Queens where they co-founded EarSay, a non-profit arts organization. Their multimedia projects portray lives of the uncelebrated, bridging the divide between documentary and expressive forms. As part of this project they produced Crossing the BLVD documentaries for New York Public Radio.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 2, 2004

    Not well done

    I was expecting this book to be a lot more interesting than it was. A lot of the stories were rather boring. There are a lot of great immigration tales out there, but I don't feel that the author portrayed them in an interesting manner. Also, the font kept changing, with 3 different fonts and 3 different stories being mixed on one page. Very hard to follow in that respect.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 30, 2004

    ADDICTIVE

    I could not put this book down. The stories are engaging and fascinating. I even went out to Astoria to visit one of the people portrayed in the book. When I told Labib how wonderful his story was, the couple at the table next to me also had a copy of the book and went to the restaraunt for the same reason I did: They just had to meet these people in person. These stories are inspiring and thought provoking. Well done! I can't wait for the movie.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 4, 2003

    CROSSING THE BLVD VIA QUEENS

    Page by page, frame by frame, Crossing the Blvd introduces the reader to the most ethnically diverse locality in the United States, Queens. The lives, images, sounds and stories of new immigrants and refugees resonate profoundly. Each page has a texture that brings to life the incredible stories of strangers who by the end of your reading experience become your neighbors. Reading the book reminded me of a documentary film. The book is a visual experience. The hard cover comes with an audio CD. The soundtrack to the book is an array of amazing compositions that stay with you. EXPERIENCE THIS BOOK! Crossing the BLVD is a testament of our present condition as Americans.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)