Crow Chief: A Plains Indian Story

Crow Chief: A Plains Indian Story

by Paul Goble
     
 

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This story relates one of the many wonderful triumphs of Falling Star, the Savior. he is known to different peoples by such names as Stone Boy, Blood Clot Boy, Lodge Boy, or White Plume Boy. Henry Wadsworth Longfellow captured the spirit of similar achievements of an unspecified Iroquois or Ojibwa Savior in his familiar 'Song of Hiawatha.' See more details below

Overview

This story relates one of the many wonderful triumphs of Falling Star, the Savior. he is known to different peoples by such names as Stone Boy, Blood Clot Boy, Lodge Boy, or White Plume Boy. Henry Wadsworth Longfellow captured the spirit of similar achievements of an unspecified Iroquois or Ojibwa Savior in his familiar 'Song of Hiawatha.'

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
PW praised the ``striking'' illustrations in this Native American legend of how the once-white crows obtained their black coloring. Ages 4-7. (Sept.)
Children's Literature - Marilyn Courtot
Before there were horses, the Plains Indians hunted buffalo by driving them off cliffs or into narrow crevices where they could be more easily killed. To get the herds to these places, the Indians would disguise themselves in buffalo robes and lure the buffalo to the spot. Crows, who were then white, were always warning the buffalo. Finally, a Savior helps the Indians capture the crow chief, who as part of his punishment is blackened forever, and who finally learns that all creatures must share in nature's bounty. Bold and intricate illustrations make the book a visual pleasure. 1995 (orig.
School Library Journal - School Library Journal
Gr 1-4-- In ancient times, according to this Plains Indian myth, crows were white. Crow Chief was so good at warning buffalo when hunters were near, that their hunts failed and the humans went hungry. In answer to the people's prayers, a savior named Falling Star comes to them. He creates a ritual that brings him close to the buffalo spirits, allowing him to catch Crow Chief. The hunters are now successful, and the crow's punishment is to watch the feast, tied to the tipi poles, where the smoke of the cooking fire turns his feathers black with soot. Falling Star eventually frees him, with the admonition that, ``The Creator told us to share and live like relatives together.'' Goble's familiar, stylish, ink-and-watercolor designs evoke, rather than reproduce, Plains art. The palette is intense and varied, the figures stylized but not static. Pleasing pictures, a worthy message, and a simple story set in clear, large type combine to make this one of Goble's most attractive books to date. --Patricia Dooley, University of Washington, Seattle

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780531085479
Publisher:
Scholastic, Inc.
Publication date:
03/28/1992
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
9.01(w) x 11.25(h) x 0.34(d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

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