Crow

Crow

by Leo Timmers
     
 


Originally published: Hasselt, Belgium: Clavis Uitgeverij, 2009.See more details below

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Overview


Originally published: Hasselt, Belgium: Clavis Uitgeverij, 2009.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Timmers (Who's Driving?) tells this be-yourself story with disciplined visual clarity. The action unfolds against a background of white on a black telephone wire that spans each spread. The blank backdrop focuses attention on the ungainly misfit Crow ("What's wrong with me?" he asks), perched on the left, and three much smaller birds perched on the right. ("He's pitch-black from top to toe," Finch says, inching away. "Must be a mean creature," adds Chickadee self-righteously.) Timmers paints Crow's mangy feathers and outsize beak with care, giving him a dignity that suggests a figure on a totem pole. Crow plots to paint himself to look like each of the smaller birds in turn so they'll like him, but he terrifies them instead; when tears of despair wash his paint away, the three small birds conclude that he's driven off those awful big birds: "You have scared them away with your burly black beak and your dark feathers!" Finch gushes. It's a story with a single punch line, but Timmers tells it with polish and style. Ages 3�5. (Oct.)
From the Publisher

"Thoughtful . . . Timmers tells this be-yourself story with disciplined visual clarity . . . polish and style."  —Publishers Weekly

"This allegory on prejudice is presented with an irony that should appeal to older readers. Timmer's 12 double-page spread illustrations, done in acrylic paints, are evocative and beautifully composed."  —Kirkus Reviews

School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 1—A large black crow is rejected by smaller, more colorful birds for being too scary. When he paints his feathers to resemble each of them in turn, he ends up creeping out the little birds even more. Finch, Parakeet, and Chickadee are ultimately relieved to see the big black crow who they think has frightened away the strange-looking newcomers, and they form a friendship with him based on this assumption. Between the friendship based on a lie, the equating of black with bad, Crow's self-esteem problem, and the awkward translation, the only thing this book has going for it is the attractive art. The vibrant and expressive acrylic cartoons on clean white backgrounds are eye-catching and exciting. However, the illustrations don't compensate for the story's negative messages and thin humor.—Heidi Estrin, Feldman Children's Library at Congregation B'nai Israel, Boca Raton, FL
Kirkus Reviews
Everyone avoids pitch-black Crow. In despair, he wonders what's wrong with him. When he hears a cheerful flock in the distance--specifically a finch, a parakeet and a chickadee--Crow tiptoes over to greet them. They flee at the very sight of him. Without a touch of color, "[h]e's not to be trusted." Crow has a stroke of genius...or madness? He paints himself blue and yellow like the finch, then green and red like the parakeet and finally pink and grey like the chickadee--but every time he scares away the little birds. What to do? In the midst of his tears, Crow is timidly approached by these same little birds, who thank him for saving them from those big, scary birds. Crow has found friends and a place at last. This allegory on prejudice is presented with an irony that should appeal to older readers, but it lacks the elemental beauty of Ashley Bryan's Beautiful Blackbird (2003). Timmer's 12 double-page spread illustrations, done in acrylic paints, are evocative and beautifully composed, with a wise use of white space--
genuine works of art. (Picture book. 3-7)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781605370712
Publisher:
Clavis
Publication date:
10/31/2010
Pages:
30
Product dimensions:
8.50(w) x 10.10(h) x 0.50(d)
Age Range:
5 Years

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